News The airline said they immediately informed police and sent an investigation team to Kenya.

Simon Wood was due to appear in court again this Friday but was found dead on August 18th after being struck by a train

Rangoli, traditional Indian folk art

It took 16 artists, 11 days and 250 shades of intricately sprinkled powder paint to create this display of Rangoli, a traditional Indian folk art. The floor decoration, 35 feet across, depicts religions of the world. It was commissioned by the Oshwal community centre in Potters Bar, Hertfordshire.

Vandals black out World Cup

A pounds 10,000 REWARD was offered last night after vandals sabotaged power supplies and blanked out television coverage of the World Cup final for hundreds of thousands of soccer fans, writes Graham Moorby.

Good intentions on the road to hell: Individuals out to help former Yugoslavia can harm official aid efforts, write Rhys Williams and Emma Daly

LARGE aid organisations are increasingly questioning the wisdom of many of the individual relief missions undertaken in the former Yugoslavia. Few doubt the good intentions of the host of individuals who have passed round the collecting tins, bought up supplies and driven down to war zones, but both the effectiveness and security of the trips are in doubt.

Renegade aid workers held in Bosnia

TWO BRITISH men missing in central Bosnia are being held by Muslim forces in Travnik, according to reports. One, a former aid worker called Steve, told a BBC producer he had smuggled ammunition to Muslim troops who were 'down to their last bullets'.

The Agreeable World of Wallace Arnold: Well that's life, Esther

UNHAPPY days, indeed. For 21 good-hearted years, Esther and her highly polished young men have had us in fits with their doughty mix of journalistic endeavour, wit, sunshine and oldfashioned British fun (incidentally, that's a word you don't hear much these days).

Family's financial nightmare after Alzheimer's struck

BRIDGET DENCH never imagined that caring for her mother, Enid Fisher, 79, could become a financial nightmare. Even when she developed Alzheimer's disease, Mrs Dench, 43, assumed her savings of more than pounds 30,000 would easily pay for nursing care, writes Marianne Macdonald.

Equestrianism: Haig delivers a change of luck for Law

LESLIE LAW held the advantage on Haig after yesterday's first day of dressage at the Toyota Three-Day event here, writes Genevieve Murphy from Bramham Park, Wetherby.

Van blaze death

(First Edition)

Obituary: Professor David Kirk

David Neville Kirk, organic chemist, born 1 July 1929, Lecturer in Organic Chemistry University of Canterbury New Zealand 1962-65, Lecturer in Chemistry Westfield College London University 1965-70, Reader in Chemistry 1970-76, Professor of Chemistry 1976-84, Professor of Chemistry Queen Mary College (now Queen Mary and Westfield College) 1984-92, married 1953 Dorothy Steers (three daughters), died Potters Bar Hertfordshire 7 October 1992.

Special Report on Company Relocation: Happiness is shaking off congestion: Changing workplace affects people as well as business. Martin Whitfield examines how one family coped with their move

'I THOUGHT it was horrific. I believed we had come to the sticks when we came here,' says Maggie Whiteley about her adopted home of Milton Keynes.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence