Voices

It is a curious phenomenon, that those who purport to love the Royals wilfully inflict so much misery upon them

The cover of Vice magazine's controversial 'fiction issue'

The media must inform about suicide, while avoiding excessive details about the method

Reporting on suicide is extremely difficult, but the Vice feature is an example of glamorising suicide - and there wasn't even a news hook

Editor's Letter: Endless wrangling, but we’ve had a Leveson breakthrough

There was no chance of the newspaper groups’ alternative charter gaining wide acceptance if it failed this independence test. This is a major step in the right direction

A statement co-ordinated by the Newspaper Society said that the Government's proposals enjoyed 'no support within the press'

Newspapers set out rival plan for press regulation

The Government has poured cold water on an alternative plan for press regulation, backed by three of the country's largest newspaper groups, which proposed an independent system of self-regulation with the power to administer £1m fines but which would not be backed by statute.

Carine Patry Hoskins and David Sherborne are accused of 'undermining the integrity of the inquiry'

Perception was all at Leveson and it also matters in this legal eagle love story

No one is suggesting that Mr Sherborne and Ms Patry Hoskins behaved with anything other than propriety, but who is to know what happens when the wigs come off?

Leveson’s legal backstop is aimed at a rogue press – not a free press

The national press which emerged from Leveson was part St George, part jackal

Fresh start for press has arrived, says PCC chief

A 75-year-old former judge, Baron Phillips of Worth Matravers, has been put in charge of establishing a new press regulation system, following the long public inquiry conducted by his judicial colleague Lord Justice Leveson.

Editorial: The least worst option for the British press

A Royal Charter is a middle way between statutory regulation and nothing

Fleet Street editors call for charitable trust to oversee new independent newspaper watchdog

Fleet Street editors are calling for a special charitable trust to be set up to oversee the new independent newspaper watchdog demanded by Lord Justice Leveson.

The art of Private Eye may be cut and paste, but its satire is bespoke

A nineteenth century stuffed dog that sat for decades under the art director's drawing board at Private Eye has gone. And following the dog out the door is the art director, who for 50 years has given Britain's best-known satirical magazine its "scrapbook" look.

Paul Dacre heads the Editors’ Code of Practice Committee, reviewing the journalists’ code

Press plans to give readers a new voice in
hope of heading off Leveson proposals

Public invited to make submissions defining what is in its interest as part of new media code

Lord Hunt, chairman of the PCC, is co-ordinating efforts to agree a new press complaints body

Up to 2,000 publications will sign up to tougher regulator

Labour says it will draft Bill that could force Government’s hand on statutory underpinning

Editorial: Only a free press is democratic

Press regulation should be overseen by the courts, not by a state-appointed body

Why should I answer to David Cameron? Leveson said much that was sensible - and much that wasn't

The Editor of Private Eye notes that his magazine was highlighting the foibles and failings of our press and politicians long before the Leveson Inquiry was set up.

Well-judged and well-received: if Leveson is Santa, this is shaping up to be a wonderful Christmas

Our writer, a former Director of the Press Complaints Commission, declares himself happy with Leveson's report

Rebekah Brooks was charged with bribery at Westminster magistrates' court yesterday

It's not all bad news: listening to Leveson yesterday, I realised this is an opportunity for the press

Our industry is beset by chronic structural problems, but it is worth taking away some positives from what has been a long, hard and useful bout of introspection

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?