Voices

It is a curious phenomenon, that those who purport to love the Royals wilfully inflict so much misery upon them

The cover of Vice magazine's controversial 'fiction issue'

The media must inform about suicide, while avoiding excessive details about the method

Reporting on suicide is extremely difficult, but the Vice feature is an example of glamorising suicide - and there wasn't even a news hook

Editor's Letter: Endless wrangling, but we’ve had a Leveson breakthrough

There was no chance of the newspaper groups’ alternative charter gaining wide acceptance if it failed this independence test. This is a major step in the right direction

A statement co-ordinated by the Newspaper Society said that the Government's proposals enjoyed 'no support within the press'

Newspapers set out rival plan for press regulation

The Government has poured cold water on an alternative plan for press regulation, backed by three of the country's largest newspaper groups, which proposed an independent system of self-regulation with the power to administer £1m fines but which would not be backed by statute.

Carine Patry Hoskins and David Sherborne are accused of 'undermining the integrity of the inquiry'

Perception was all at Leveson and it also matters in this legal eagle love story

No one is suggesting that Mr Sherborne and Ms Patry Hoskins behaved with anything other than propriety, but who is to know what happens when the wigs come off?

Leveson’s legal backstop is aimed at a rogue press – not a free press

The national press which emerged from Leveson was part St George, part jackal

Fresh start for press has arrived, says PCC chief

A 75-year-old former judge, Baron Phillips of Worth Matravers, has been put in charge of establishing a new press regulation system, following the long public inquiry conducted by his judicial colleague Lord Justice Leveson.

Editorial: The least worst option for the British press

A Royal Charter is a middle way between statutory regulation and nothing

Fleet Street editors call for charitable trust to oversee new independent newspaper watchdog

Fleet Street editors are calling for a special charitable trust to be set up to oversee the new independent newspaper watchdog demanded by Lord Justice Leveson.

The art of Private Eye may be cut and paste, but its satire is bespoke

A nineteenth century stuffed dog that sat for decades under the art director's drawing board at Private Eye has gone. And following the dog out the door is the art director, who for 50 years has given Britain's best-known satirical magazine its "scrapbook" look.

Paul Dacre heads the Editors’ Code of Practice Committee, reviewing the journalists’ code

Press plans to give readers a new voice in
hope of heading off Leveson proposals

Public invited to make submissions defining what is in its interest as part of new media code

Lord Hunt, chairman of the PCC, is co-ordinating efforts to agree a new press complaints body

Up to 2,000 publications will sign up to tougher regulator

Labour says it will draft Bill that could force Government’s hand on statutory underpinning

Editorial: Only a free press is democratic

Press regulation should be overseen by the courts, not by a state-appointed body

Why should I answer to David Cameron? Leveson said much that was sensible - and much that wasn't

The Editor of Private Eye notes that his magazine was highlighting the foibles and failings of our press and politicians long before the Leveson Inquiry was set up.

Well-judged and well-received: if Leveson is Santa, this is shaping up to be a wonderful Christmas

Our writer, a former Director of the Press Complaints Commission, declares himself happy with Leveson's report

Rebekah Brooks was charged with bribery at Westminster magistrates' court yesterday

It's not all bad news: listening to Leveson yesterday, I realised this is an opportunity for the press

Our industry is beset by chronic structural problems, but it is worth taking away some positives from what has been a long, hard and useful bout of introspection

Voices
voicesGood for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth, writes Grace Dent
Sport
The Pipes and Drums of The Scottish Regiments perform during the Opening Ceremony for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games at Celtic Park on July 23, 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland.
Commonwealth GamesThe actor encouraged the one billion viewers of the event to donate to the children's charity
Arts and Entertainment
The Tour de France peloton rides over a bridge on the Grinton Moor, Yorkshire, earlier this month
film
Life and Style
fashion Designs are part of feminist art project by a British student
News
Very tasty: Vladimir Putin dining alone, perhaps sensibly
newsJohn Walsh salutes those brave souls who have, throughout history, put their knives on the line
News
The University of California study monitored the reaction of 36 dogs
sciencePets' range of emotions revealed
Arts and Entertainment
The nomination of 'The Wake' by Paul Kingsnorth has caused a stir
books
News
Joining forces: young British men feature in an Isis video in which they urge Islamists in the West to join them in Iraq and Syria
newsWill the young Britons fighting in Syria be allowed to return home and resume their lives?
News
i100
News
Snoop Dogg pictured at The Hollywood Reporter Nominees' Night in February, 2013
people... says Snoop Dogg
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Screwing your way to the top? Good for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth

Screwing your way to the top?

Good for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth, says Grace Dent
Will the young Britons fighting in Syria be allowed to return home and resume their lives?

Will Britons fighting in Syria be able to resume their lives?

Tony Blair's Terrorism Act 2006 has made it an offence to take part in military action abroad with a "political, ideological, religious or racial motive"
Beyoncé poses as Rosie the Riveter, the wartime poster girl who became a feminist pin-up

Beyoncé poses as Rosie the Riveter

The wartime poster girl became the ultimate American symbol of female empowerment
Climate change threatens to make the antarctic fur seal extinct

Take a good look while you can

How climate change could wipe out this seal
Should emergency hospital weddings be made easier for the terminally ill?

Should emergency hospital weddings be made easier?

Some couples are allowed emergency hospital weddings, others are denied the right. Kate Hilpern reports on the growing case for a compassionate cutting of the red tape
Man Booker Prize 2014 longlist: Crowdfunded novel nominated for first time

Crowdfunded novel nominated for Booker Prize

Paul Kingsnorth's 'The Wake' is in contention for the prestigious award
Vladimir Putin employs a full-time food taster to ensure his meals aren't poisoned

Vladimir Putin employs a full-time food taster

John Walsh salutes those brave souls who have, throughout history, put their knives on the line
Tour de France effect brings Hollywood blockbusters to Yorkshire

Tour de France effect brings Hollywood blockbusters to Yorkshire

A $25m thriller starring Sam Worthington to be made in God's Own Country
The 10 best pedicure products

Feet treat: 10 best pedicure products

Bags packed and all prepped for holidays, but feet in a state? Get them flip-flop-ready with our pick of the items for a DIY treatment
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit