Arts and Entertainment

For a long time, the mentally ill were dumb and mute in literature. Inarticulacy surrounded those lumped together as Bedlamites: Jane Eyre’s classic “madwoman” in the attic, for instance, served as little more than a plot device, a thing to fear and loathe that got in the way of a Gothic romance.

Two thirds of the suicides analysed had linkable hospital records

A quarter of suicides happen within 90 days of being discharged from hospital, study finds

A quarter of suicides occur within three months of discharge from hospital, a major study in Scotland has found.

'Psychometric tests' landed Co-op Bank job for Paul Flowers

The Co-operative Bank's disgraced former chairman, Paul Flowers, apparently won the job because he beat his rivals' psychometric test scores, MPs on the Treasury Committee have been told.

Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes

How to 'Sherlock' your degree: The art of building a memory palace

In the current BBC series, Sherlock Holmes solves his crimes as much through his powers of recall as deduction. Here's how to apply them to your degree

Behind bars: Reformed prisoners could be held in jail longer than is necessary

Exclusive: Parole system failing prisoners and close to be overwhelmed, lawyers warn

Inmates due to be freed should have face-to-face hearings – but there are not enough officers to go round

‘High’ street: A shopping spree really does make you happy, says new research

Say buy buy to the blues: Picking goods and paying for them really does banish sadness, says a study into retail therapy

A shopping spree really does make you happy, says new research

Book review: "The Crooked Maid" by Dan Vyleta

Viennese noir... with red tinges

Matt Parker, far right, heads a 16-man team charged with preparing England for the World Cup next year

Six Nations Championship: ‘Mr Marginal Gains’ gears up England’s game

There are plenty of people out there who look at the way the All Blacks are playing – not to mention the way the Springboks have added a sprinkling of panache to their power game – and reach the conclusion that England cannot possibly win their home World Cup next year without a miracle.

Holly Bleasdale endured a miserable, injury-hit 2013

Revitalised Holly Bleasdale is focused on medals and that five-metre mark

For most, it has proved  unattainable. Only two athletes have ever achieved such lofty feats: one is the current Olympic champion, American Jennifer Suhr, the other the greatest female vaulter of all time, Yelena Isinbayeva.

File: Scientists say working night shifts sends the body's finely-tuned DNA into 'chaos' and could have lasting damage to health

Just thinking you had a good night's sleep can improve cognitive skills

Sleep 'placebo' improves brain function, researchers have found

Tallulah Wilson, 15, was found dead on the tracks at St Pancras station in London

The death of Tallulah Wilson: Mother of 15-year-old who was hit by a train urges awareness 'of a toxic digital world'

The gifted young dancer became obsessed with the internet, sharing pictures of her self-harm on the blogging website Tumblr

Police evacuate students from the Electrical Engineering building of Purdue University

Purdue shooting: Police say gunman may have been targeting a particular individual as he surrendered within moments of killing male victim

The suspect did not attack anyone else, but is not cooperating with investigators

The Shock of the Fall By Nathan Filer, book review: 'Moved by the dark humour in a poignant debut'

Nathan Filer's debut novel recently won the Costa First Novel Award. Written by a psychiatric nurse, it is a tragi-comic look at a man's descent into schizophrenia. The novel is written from the point of view of 19-year-old Matthew, who starts off recalling a holiday 10 years earlier with his parents and brother Simon, who had Down's syndrome. We learn early on that Simon died during that holiday, though we don't find out exactly how until later.

Book review: 'Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, And The Gap Between Us And Them' by Joshua Greene

Joshua Greene, an associate professor in social sciences at Harvard, attempts to answer the question of how conflicts between people can be resolved.

Members of Falun Gong spiritual movement meditate at the Lafayette Park. A new study has suggested that spiritual activity such as meditation may hep prevent depression by thickening the brain cortex

Spiritual or religious activity may protect against depression by thickening brain cortex

Those who place a high level of importance on spirituality and religion were found to have thicker cortices in the areas normally associated with thinning in people at risk, than those who did not

Liverpool manager Brendan Rodgers

Brendan Rodgers points to improving 'game, mental personality and fitness' at Liverpool

The Reds take on Aston Villa at Anfield this weekend

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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project