Arts and Entertainment

For a long time, the mentally ill were dumb and mute in literature. Inarticulacy surrounded those lumped together as Bedlamites: Jane Eyre’s classic “madwoman” in the attic, for instance, served as little more than a plot device, a thing to fear and loathe that got in the way of a Gothic romance.

Two thirds of the suicides analysed had linkable hospital records

A quarter of suicides happen within 90 days of being discharged from hospital, study finds

A quarter of suicides occur within three months of discharge from hospital, a major study in Scotland has found.

'Psychometric tests' landed Co-op Bank job for Paul Flowers

The Co-operative Bank's disgraced former chairman, Paul Flowers, apparently won the job because he beat his rivals' psychometric test scores, MPs on the Treasury Committee have been told.

Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes

How to 'Sherlock' your degree: The art of building a memory palace

In the current BBC series, Sherlock Holmes solves his crimes as much through his powers of recall as deduction. Here's how to apply them to your degree

Behind bars: Reformed prisoners could be held in jail longer than is necessary

Exclusive: Parole system failing prisoners and close to be overwhelmed, lawyers warn

Inmates due to be freed should have face-to-face hearings – but there are not enough officers to go round

‘High’ street: A shopping spree really does make you happy, says new research

Say buy buy to the blues: Picking goods and paying for them really does banish sadness, says a study into retail therapy

A shopping spree really does make you happy, says new research

Book review: "The Crooked Maid" by Dan Vyleta

Viennese noir... with red tinges

Matt Parker, far right, heads a 16-man team charged with preparing England for the World Cup next year

Six Nations Championship: ‘Mr Marginal Gains’ gears up England’s game

There are plenty of people out there who look at the way the All Blacks are playing – not to mention the way the Springboks have added a sprinkling of panache to their power game – and reach the conclusion that England cannot possibly win their home World Cup next year without a miracle.

Holly Bleasdale endured a miserable, injury-hit 2013

Revitalised Holly Bleasdale is focused on medals and that five-metre mark

For most, it has proved  unattainable. Only two athletes have ever achieved such lofty feats: one is the current Olympic champion, American Jennifer Suhr, the other the greatest female vaulter of all time, Yelena Isinbayeva.

File: Scientists say working night shifts sends the body's finely-tuned DNA into 'chaos' and could have lasting damage to health

Just thinking you had a good night's sleep can improve cognitive skills

Sleep 'placebo' improves brain function, researchers have found

Tallulah Wilson, 15, was found dead on the tracks at St Pancras station in London

The death of Tallulah Wilson: Mother of 15-year-old who was hit by a train urges awareness 'of a toxic digital world'

The gifted young dancer became obsessed with the internet, sharing pictures of her self-harm on the blogging website Tumblr

Police evacuate students from the Electrical Engineering building of Purdue University

Purdue shooting: Police say gunman may have been targeting a particular individual as he surrendered within moments of killing male victim

The suspect did not attack anyone else, but is not cooperating with investigators

The Shock of the Fall By Nathan Filer, book review: 'Moved by the dark humour in a poignant debut'

Nathan Filer's debut novel recently won the Costa First Novel Award. Written by a psychiatric nurse, it is a tragi-comic look at a man's descent into schizophrenia. The novel is written from the point of view of 19-year-old Matthew, who starts off recalling a holiday 10 years earlier with his parents and brother Simon, who had Down's syndrome. We learn early on that Simon died during that holiday, though we don't find out exactly how until later.

Book review: 'Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, And The Gap Between Us And Them' by Joshua Greene

Joshua Greene, an associate professor in social sciences at Harvard, attempts to answer the question of how conflicts between people can be resolved.

Members of Falun Gong spiritual movement meditate at the Lafayette Park. A new study has suggested that spiritual activity such as meditation may hep prevent depression by thickening the brain cortex

Spiritual or religious activity may protect against depression by thickening brain cortex

Those who place a high level of importance on spirituality and religion were found to have thicker cortices in the areas normally associated with thinning in people at risk, than those who did not

Liverpool manager Brendan Rodgers

Brendan Rodgers points to improving 'game, mental personality and fitness' at Liverpool

The Reds take on Aston Villa at Anfield this weekend

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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones