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Rachel Johnson

Diary: A pair of Blow-Up models

Last week David Gandy D&G's favourite budgie-smuggler, kept us guessing as to the details of his first acting role, in a film he's shot with fellow model Helena Christensen. Cornered at the Triumph Inspiration Awards, Christensen, was more forthcoming than her co-star. Turns out the short is a tribute to Antonioni's 1966 classic, Blow-Up. Its director is Edoardo Ponti, son of Sophia Loren and Carlo Ponti, who produced the original movie about a fashion photographer embroiled in a murder. Gender roles reversed, the tribute features Christensen (herself a snapper) as the photographer, with Gandy in the blessedly unchallenging role of one of her models. "I have huge admiration for actors; it is one of the strangest places you can go with yourself," said Christensen airily. "I wanted to push myself into a situation where I'm pulled out of a comfort zone and put in a very challenging place... It was an amazing experience." Essex-born Gandy's description was somewhat earthier: "I haven't had a single acting class," he told me, "[so] I was really bricking it."

The Diary: Richard Hamilton; Jimmy Carr; John Constable; Bompas and

At the ripe old age of 88, Richard Hamilton is showing his playful side as he curates a show opening at the Alan Cristea Gallery next month. Titled "Shit and Flowers", it will include, deep breath, paintings from the artist's lesser-known scatological phase. Not shown since the 1970s and never as a group, the works consist of romantic, pastoral scenes, worthy of Watteau, into which the godfather of Pop Art has painted Andrex loo rolls and rather less fragrant elements. "Flowery allure is an irrelevant anachronism in the context of cultural ideas in our period", Hamilton explains. "It takes perversity and a touch of irony to make it tolerable."

Design: Gods of small things

Tired of the expensive plans in glossy mags, Kate Watson-Smyth takes advice from real gardeners on how to turn a city yard into an oasis