News Fireman Christian McClean comforts colleague Alex Badcock (right) after they both finished the last ever shift at Clerkenwell fire station in London.

There were emotional scenes as firestations across the capital closed their doors

Freedom proves fatal to eagle owl of St Paul's

An escaped eagle owl which had been nesting in the roof of St Paul's Cathedral for the last two weeks was found dead by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals yesterday.

Cue: storm scene ... the heavens open on Britain's outdoor theatricals

It's an ill wind ... the open-air theatre season has opened to the most unseasonable weather in living memory. But not everyone is counting the cost.

A zoo romance ...

London Zoo's two-year-old pygmy hippopotamuses making their debut in Regent's Park yesterday. Hope, from Edinburgh, and Nicolas, from Rome, are the zoo's first hippos since 1988. At only 1m tall, the web-footed pygmies are one twentieth the size of their common cousins

Theatre / All's Well That Ends Well Open Air Theatre, Regent's Park, London

In the theatre, as in life, there are two ways of approaching a problem: either you can try to solve it, or you can plough merrily on and hope it will go away. Helena Kaut-Howson favours the second approach, if her production of All's Well That Ends Well is anything to go by; and on this showing, there is something to be said for it.

Bouquet of Bard wire

Helena Kaut-Howson doesn't go in for traditional tourist-pleasers. Her latest production, 'All's Well That Ends Well', for the Open Air Theatre in Regent's Park, is no exception. It is set in a contemporary war zone.

CHEAP OR CHIC?

Is a good wine all in the taste or is the label equally important?

Cricket: Ramprakash leads the centurions

Middlesex 400-2 v Northamptonshire

THEATRE: Something in the air

A Midsummer Night's Dream Open Air Theatre, Regent's Park, London

Theatre With David Benedict

Hot news: David Hare is to direct Heartbreak House. His bold, rigorous translation of Chekhov's little known Ivanov swept audiences off their feet at the Almeida earlier this year (I know, I saw it twice). And Heartbreak House - a Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes is George Bernard Shaw's most Chekhovian play. So enticing is the combination of Hare and the Almeida and this terrific text, that a dynamite cast has already signed up for the pounds 260 per week wage. After playing Galliano there in Hare's Brecht Translation, Richard Griffiths returns to play Captain Shotover. Malcolm Sinclair will play the idealistic Mazzini Dunn, with Emma Fielding as his daughter Ellie and there's the altogether alluring prospect of a sister act by the illustrious Penelope Wilton and Patrica Hodge as Hesione Hushabye and Lady Utterword.

Profile: Acting the fool - Jim Broadbent

Actor Jim Broadbent talks with James Rampton

Good news in Blair country

Under the massed ranks of cameras last weekend, Islington enjoyed its finest hour. All over the world, people were given pictures of New Labour's spiritual heartland basking in glorious sunshine. No wonder that estate agents were counting the landslide in pounds rather than votes. They are hoping that the Prime Minister will do for Islington what Margaret Thatcher did for Chelsea.

An urban sanctuary for bears or cynical showbiz?

Animal welfare campaigners yesterday condemned London Zoo's reintroduction of bears to its newly refurbished Mappin Terrace, which opens to the public on Saturday.

Doing what comes naturally

Fashions come and go but Ian Mankin's natural fabrics are always in demand, reports Hester Lacey

Obituary: Sir Victor Pritchett

For surprisingly many years V. S. Pritchett (Sir Victor Pritchett) was the best short-story writer and, equally, the best impressionistic literary critic in Britain. He was also the author of a very distinguished travel-book, The Spanish Temper (1954), five estimable novels, and a memorable two-volume autobiography (A Cab at the Door, 1968; and Midnight Oil, 1971). But the fact that his reputation was always high and suffered no great fluctuations tended to obscure the real distinction and importance of his achievement.

Prophet and loss account

Books: David J Goldberg heckles the Chief Rabbi's suburban sermon
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How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth

Would people cooperate to face a global peril?
Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

One day to find €1.6bn

Greece is edging inexorably towards an exit from the euro
New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could become reality

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Pride of Place: Historians map out untold LGBT histories of locations throughout UK

Historians map out untold LGBT histories

Public are being asked to help improve the map
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Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

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Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
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'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

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We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?
Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

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'Heritage' is a loaded word in the Dixie, but the Charleston killings show how dangerous it is to cling to a deadly past, says Rupert Cornwell
What exactly does 'one' mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

What exactly does 'one' mean?

Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue