Life and Style

The odds are stacked against the Wright Brothers. First of all, their latest restaurant is in Spitalfields Market, which nobody aged 30 or over should ever be seen near. Second, this is a seafood place, and I've just come back from Italy and Cornwall, where I had so much fish that the thought of another crustacean makes me ill. Third, this restaurant is out and proud about its crustacea – which means you have the dubious pleasure of seeing them fighting in huge tanks barely two metres from the seating area. Fourth, this opening is part of a chain (the third of its kind in the capital, following openings in Soho and Borough market), and your correspondent demands higher standards from chains. Fifth, I am in an extremely foul mood, had you not twigged, having just had my latest in a series of contretemps with a fellow journalist.

UK weather: Whole of Britain warned to expect storms as January rainfall set to double average

Cold snap to give way to heavy rain and gale force winds on Friday

UK weather: Cold snap on the way as southwest continues to face flooding risk

Yesterday the Environment Secretary said Somerset Levels residents were ‘right to be angry’

This 1348 painting shows how plague devastated European cities like Florence

The Black Death: Plague that killed millions is able to rise from the dead

Black rats are also implicated in both outbreaks, which took place 800 years apart

Local councillor Julian Taylor following a visit by the Environment Secretary Owen Paterson at the Northmoor Pumping Station

It’s like living in a ‘third-world country,’ flood-hit residents tell Environment Secretary Owen Paterson on his flying visit to Somerset Levels

Visit of the Environment Secretary to the Somerset Levels lambasted as a ‘publicity stunt’ by angry campaigners

Arnold Schwarzenegger goes undercover at Gold's Gym, gets recognised by everyone

Customer tells Arnie: "You look familiar"

Crews clean up a chemical spill along the Elk River in Charleston, West Virginia

Company blamed for West Virginia chemical spill files for bankruptcy amid court claims

Freedom Industries facing lawsuits and investigations after spill that left 300,000 without water

Mark Leftly: Boris Johnson's airport plan is a monumental folly without a grain of sense

Westminster Outlook Boris Johnson's plan to replace Heathrow Airport with a four-runway mega-hub on the Isle of Grain in Kent is a curious thing. The London mayor's own submission to the Airports Commission last summer concedes: "National Grid's LNG (liquefied natural gas) facility… on the south-east side of the island, is too tall and too close to the proposed airport site."

Crews clean up a chemical spill along the Elk River in Charleston, West Virginia

Hundreds with symptoms of chemical exposure and 300,000 without water after West Virginia spill

Authorities have still not declared the water supply safe two days after contamination

The News Matrix: Thursday 9 January 2014

Traffic stops for EU presidency switch

Police monitor protesters standing near to the entrance of a drill site in Balcombe, last July

People living in fracking areas set to get more compensation

Ministers ready to increase sums paid to affected communities in effort to pacify local opposition

Man pulled from sewage tank in Falmouth dies

A man who was found in a filtration tank at a sewage treatment plant has died.

A Landrover makes it's way along a flooded road near Lingfield

UK floods: Top tips for driving in wet conditions and standing water as Britain faces ‘exceptional’ bad weather

The Environment Agency has issued a set of severe flood warnings, the highest category

New Yorkers live longer today than when Michael Bloomberg took office 12 years ago, but the city's homelessness problem has grown under his watch

BP secures $16bn deal to develop Oman gas project

The British oil major will drill around 300 wells over 15 years to produce about a third of Oman’s total daily domestic gas supply

Donald Macintyre's Sketch: Know your Ford Focus from a Vauxhall Astra, Mr Osborne?

Years ago, when select committees were in their infancy, the aristocratic Tory minister Lord (Grey) Gowrie was asked by an MP a question which he hadn’t a clue how to answer. “What do you think this is?” retorted an outraged Gowrie. “Mastermind?”

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

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This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine