George MacKay and Rob Brydon, a winning team in 'The Best of Men'

The Best of Men, BBC2, Thursday
EastEnders, BBC1, Monday

There will be gongs galore for the story of the Paralympics, but Walford is on the critical list

Long lost friend: Matt LeBlanc plays a version of himself in 'Episodes'

The TV stars just being themselves

A little self-parody can go a long way in an acting career, says Gerard Gilbert. Just ask Matt LeBlanc...

Long lost friend: Matt LeBlanc plays a version of himself in 'Episodes'

The TV stars who are just being themselves

A little self-parody can go a long way. Just ask Matt LeBlanc...

The Jolly Folly of Polly the Scottish Trolley Dolly and Other Mini-Marvels, Brighton Fringe, Brighton

In a tiny upstairs theatre, a man in a wig and kimono asks us to imagine we’re in the Albert Hall. We never discover his name though, in his role in a glittering production of Madame Butterfly, he is known as “Second Japanese villager on the left”.

On Thursday 22nd March, David Walliams will take on the role of Editor for one day, for a special Sport Relief edition of The Independent and i, to be published on Friday 23rd March

David Walliams to guest edit The Independent and i for Sport Relief

Guest contributors include John Bishop, Jimmy Carr, Rob Brydon and more…

Sarah Sands: A prodigal son returns. Welcome back!

The vagaries of celebrity that have blown Cheryl Cole back across the Atlantic will strike terror in many British performers, but James Corden need worry no longer. He turned his back on television just before it consumed him, with a wise decision to return to the theatre that launched him. His acknowledgement of a standing ovation at the first night of the National's latest hit, One Man, Two Guvnors, last week, was modest and relieved. The returning sinner was not merely forgiven but greeted with rapture. The son of a Christian bookseller, Corden was almost lost, but now is found.

The Shadow Line: When shots in the dark are right on target

Hugo Blick's new conspiracy thriller, The Shadow Line, promises to be a classic of the genre, says Gerard Gilbert

Did you believe all the tall tales? More fool you

Today being the day after April Fool's Day, it now seems safe to report that Scotland really may be the launch pad for the space tourists of tomorrow; that police in Cornwall really did question a 13-year-old schoolboy on suspicion of common assault after he threw a marshmallow at a fellow pupil; and that, much to the chagrin of local residents, there really is a bakery in the Bedfordshire village of Henlow called "Nice Baps". Readers familiar with the newspaper tradition of inserting an outrageous, fake story into the 1 April edition could be forgiven for having believed otherwise.

Heads Up: The Passion

In Wales's green and pleasant land – the Easter story retold

Last Night's TV: How Science Changed Our World/BBC1<br />Being Ronnie Corbett/BBC2<br />Christmas with Gordon/Channel 4

As claims to fame go, it's not a bad one: Wilhelmina, pet rabbit of Professor Robert Winston, was one of the first living beings to be photographed by MRA scan. Winston had been down the pub with some friends who had, he explained, rushed in bearing news of a machine they'd built. An old TV, a few bits of wire, and there you have it: one of the first MRA scanners in the history of the universe. Understandably, they wanted to try it out right away. And so off they went to collect Winston and his rabbit.

DVD: The Trip (15)

"Desperate to be taken seriously aren't you?" Rob Brydon wryly points out to Steve Coogan in Michael Winterbottom's sublime mid-life crisis comedy, which is a boozy, barbed blend of Sideways, Withnail and I and Curb Your Enthusiasm (the story is fictional but based around their real personas).

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us