Arts and Entertainment Killer chords: Wilko Johnson

The musician said he was currently 'feeling fine' and joked his farewell tour could get 'embarrassing' if it extends into next year

Fantasy Band: Jace Lasek, The Besnard Lakes

'Brian Wilson has the most melodic bass lines ever'

Pulp, Royal Albert Hall, London

The people's favourites show they're still in a different class

Roger Daltrey in the 1975 rock opera 'Lisztomania'. Ken Russell had the courage to create great art

Jessica Duchen: Russell was always at top of my Liszt

The week in culture

Terence Blacker: Come off it Paxo, you can't blame the baby-boomers

The Way We Live: The idea that billions of people were uniquely selfish is idiotic

A Book of Liszts, By John Spurling

With the Faustian frenzy of the first "Mephisto Waltz" and the macabre extravaganza of the Totentanz, tonight the BBC Proms winds up its celebration of the music of Franz Liszt. Born 200 years ago, the son of a farm manager on the Esterhazy estates in Hungary, the piano virtuoso and revolutionary composer debuted aged nine. At 11, he played for Beethoven, who kissed the boy's forehead and blessed him as "one of the fortunate ones" who bring "joy".

'Whistle Test' returns to the BBC

"Whispering" bob Harris is to host The Old Grey Whistle Test once again in a radio revival of the classic BBC music show.

Diary: The cost of curves

Never one to shy away from highlighting hypocrisy, readers may recall I was quick to note criticism of certain "quality" newspaper editors who seemed intent on publishing giant photographs of Mad Men's Christina Hendricks whenever given the slightest excuse. Indeed, I was careful to ensure my own written assault was accompanied by a sizeable picture of the said actress, just to drive home the point. (Disappointingly, certain readers later saw fit to question my motives, but that's another story).

George Davis wins appeal

A man whose case became part of criminal folklore after he was jailed for armed robbery finally had his conviction overturned today after decades of protesting his innocence.

Roger Daltrey is not 'rock 'n' roll' enough for 'Idol'

There have been few harsher critics of Simon Cowell's influence on pop than Roger Daltrey, who last year declared TV talent contests a "joke", saying: "The music they make on the shows is absolute tripe."

Roger Daltrey, Royal Albert Hall, London

If Tommy was made of bricks and mortar it would be Grade I listed by now. The tale of the deaf, dumb and blind kid with messianic tendencies is heritage rock, as safely establishment as the Albert Hall itself.

Pete Townshend wishes he hadn't joined The Who

Pete Townshend wishes he had never joined The Who.

Roger Daltrey set to revive The Who's hit rock opera Tommy at Royal Albert Hall

Roger Daltrey is performing The Who's 1969 hit rock opera Tommy at the Royal Albert Hall next week, in aid of Teenage Cancer Trust.

Liam Gallagher doesn't do vocal warm ups

Liam Gallagher doesn't do proper vocal warm ups because he doesn't want to sound like Chris Martin.

Cultural Life: Joanna Trollope, novelist

Books: As usual, I have several books on the go. The current crop includes Kishwar Desai's 'Witness The Night', which won the Costa first novel prize; George Eliot's 'Daniel Deronda', which I'm re-reading skipping most of the ponderous faith/Jewish culture bits; and Colin Thubron's 'A Mountain in Tibet' – he's such a writer, and my late pa got halfway to Lhasa from Delhi in 1944, when he hadn't enough wartime leave to come home in.

George Davis back to prove he is innocent, OK?

The question of whether George Davis, armed robber and East End legend, really was "innocent, OK?" was finally being considered in the Court of Appeal yesterday. The notorious slogan, daubed on walls, bridges and emblazoned across the shirts of rock stars came to symbolise the breakdown of faith in the police and criminal justice system in the 1970s.

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Blundering Tony Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

Blundering Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

For Arabs – and for Britons who lost their loved ones in his shambolic war in Iraq – his appointment was an insult, says Robert Fisk
Fifa corruption arrests: All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue

Fifa corruption arrests

All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue, says Ian Herbert
Isis in Syria: The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of President Assad and militant fighters

The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of Assad and Isis

In Syrian Kurdish cantons along the Turkish border, the progressive aims of the 2011 uprising are being enacted despite the war. Patrick Cockburn returns to Amuda
How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields: Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape the US

How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields

Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape to the US
Stephen Mangan interview: From posh buffoon to pregnant dad, the actor has quite a range

How Stephen Mangan got his range

Posh buffoon, hapless writer, pregnant dad - Mangan is certainly a versatile actor
The ZX Spectrum has been crowd-funded back into play - with some 21st-century tweaks

The ZX Spectrum is back

The ZX Spectrum was the original - and for some players, still the best. David Crookes meets the fans who've kept the games' flames lit
Grace of Monaco film panned: even the screenwriter pours scorn on biopic starring Nicole Kidman

Even the screenwriter pours scorn on Grace of Monaco biopic

The critics had a field day after last year's premiere, but the savaging goes on
Menstrual Hygiene Day: The strange ideas people used to believe about periods

Menstrual Hygiene Day: The strange ideas people once had about periods

If one was missed, vomiting blood was seen as a viable alternative
The best work perks: From free travel cards to making dreams come true (really)

The quirks of work perks

From free travel cards to making dreams come true (really)
Is bridge the latest twee pastime to get hip?

Is bridge becoming hip?

The number of young players has trebled in the past year. Gillian Orr discovers if this old game has new tricks
Long author-lists on research papers are threatening the academic work system

The rise of 'hyperauthorship'

Now that academic papers are written by thousands (yes, thousands) of contributors, it's getting hard to tell workers from shirkers
The rise of Lego Clubs: How toys are helping children struggling with social interaction to build better relationships

The rise of Lego Clubs

How toys are helping children struggling with social interaction to build better relationships
5 best running glasses

On your marks: 5 best running glasses

Whether you’re pounding pavements, parks or hill passes, keep your eyes protected in all weathers
Joe Root: 'Ben Stokes gives everything – he’s rubbing off on us all'

'Ben Stokes gives everything – he’s rubbing off on us all'

Joe Root says the England dressing room is a happy place again – and Stokes is the catalyst
Raif Badawi: Wife pleads for fresh EU help as Saudi blogger's health worsens

Please save my husband

As the health of blogger Raif Badawi worsens in prison, his wife urges EU governments to put pressure on the Saudi Arabian royal family to allow her husband to join his family in Canada