Life through a lens: David Morrissey and Sheridan Smith in 'The 7.39'

The 7.39, BBC1, review: David Nicholls charms once again with a romance that's on the right track

Poor old Olivia Colman doesn't have much luck with on-screen husbands, does she? In Peep Show, she was lumbered with drippy Mark, the less said about her Broadchurch spouse the better, and in The 7.39, on BBC1 last night, Colman played the unsuspecting "her indoors" of cheating commuter Carl (David Morrissey).

Best of 2014: Books

Arifa Akbar picks this year’s must-read book releases

Australia wicket-keeper Brad Haddin scored yet another half-century as he hit 75 in the fifth and final Ashes Test against England

Ashes 2013-14: The Aussie angle

If Haddin is about to retire, what better way to go than after the series of his life in which he has saved the Aussies time and time again?

Willian was Chelsea's most expensive signing over the summer

Comment: It might not be what the football fans want, but agents are here to stay

It is understandable, to say the least, why football fans can get so frustrated at the amount of their money that ends up in the hands of football agents. Even in the era of the billionaire foreign benefactor, the theory has always been that the fans’ wages pay the players, through the medium of paying for tickets. For there to be other well-rewarded recipients almost feels like a betrayal of that.

A founder member of Mercury-nominated Portico Quartet, Nick Mulvey played Latitude in a solo capacity

Music review: Nick Mulvey, XOYO

He has put away the Chinese hang, yet Nick Mulvey is proving just as adept on acoustic guitar as he delights this packed basement venue with his bewitching technique. As a founder of Mercury-shortlisted jazz outfit Portico Quartet, he introduced us to that UFO-shaped percussion instrument. Now with two EPs under his belt, Mulvey is building up to the release of a major-label album next year.

Boris Johnson undecided on Commons return

Speculation suggests London Mayor could stand for Parliament in 2016

Monsieur Le Commandant, by Romain Slocombe. Gallic, £8.99

A French Academician, Paul-Jean Husson writes a letter to his local SS officer revealing his illicit passion for his Jewish daughter-in-law, so placing her fate in the commandant’s hands.

Book reivew: The Horologicon, By Mark Forsyth

Ahoy! A word lover's guide to English archaisms

Edinburgh 2013: John Robins: Where Is My Mind?

A former flatmate of a clutch of successful Bristol-based comics that included Russell Howard and Jon Richardson, John Robins could be the next of his peer group to go on to greater things.

Edinburgh 2013: The Love Project - Documentary theatre with a big heart

Sixteen different real-life accounts of love are delivered by four actors in this nicely realised piece of verbatim theatre.

McCutcheon: Penned one ageless satire

Invisible Ink: No 177 - George McCutcheon

Whimsy is hard to pull off. In the wrong hands it becomes fey and cloying. When it's done well it can create a loyal, lasting audience, as Terry Pratchett will tell you.

Taylor Swift performing with Ed Sheeran at the Capital FM Summertime Ball 2013

Never ever getting together? Ed Sheeran joins Taylor Swift for surprise duet at Wembley

Taylor Swift, it seems, has something of a soft spot for British men.

Helen Hunt with John Hawkes in The Sessions

DVD & Blu-ray review: The Sessions (15)

Ben Lewin (95mins)

Hippie days: India Salvor Menuez (centre) in ‘Something in the Air’

Is online dating the solution to lonely hearts?

No matter what our age, background or relationship status, we’re all connected by one common theme – our quest to find love.

News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
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Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
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Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
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Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
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A Bible for billionaires

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Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
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Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
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The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

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We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

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The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

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