News

David Tennant will be beamed into up to 3,000 schools next week as part of a venture to bring live theatre closer to the hearts and minds of schoolchildren.

'The Roaring Girl' was last played at the RSC by Helen Mirren in 1983

Roaring girls: RSC to stage little-known plays with feisty female roles

The three Jacobean plays will provide more roles for actresses

The News Matrix: Saturday 06 July 2013

Police officer admits Lawrence bug

John Nettles in ITV's 'Midsomer Murders'

RSC actor Gwilym Lee to joing Midsomer Murders cast

Shakespearean star Gwilym Lee is joining the cast of Midsomer Murders.

From left: theatre director and comic actor Ken Campbell; Vioinst Rohan Kriwaczek andIn 1956, Doctor Tuesday Lobsang Rampa wrote the book The Third Eye

Hoaxes: The Royal Dickens Company, on the fiddle, and the plumbing lama

Dr David Bramwell, creator of the Cheeky Guides series, is also an expert "trickologist" and will be performing a comic lecture on the history of hoaxes, pranks and mischief at Hendrick's Carnival of Knowledge at the Brighton Fringe in May. Here he shares three of his favourite lesser-known pranks.

Mark Rylance as Johnny ‘Rooster’ Byron in Jerusalem

Mark Rylance to play Thomas Cromwell in television adaptation of Hilary Mantel's novels

After his recent stint as Richard III the actor Mark Rylance is to take on another major period of British history in a television adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s award-winning novels.

Anjin; The Shogun and the English Samurai, Sadler's Wells

Anjin; The Shogun and the English Samurai, Sadler's Wells, London

If you think a play that sets out to celebrate the 400th anniversary of UK-Japan relations sounds in danger of becoming a dry history lesson, you'd be right.

The Mouse and His Child

Holiday treats for kids at the theatre

Holly Williams gives a run down of this year's top Children's shows

Actors will play BP ‘executive witches’. The performance will culminate in the BP witches being physically carried out of the museum by the crowd, and banished from any further involvement in British culture.

The great Shakespearean flashmob strikes again

The Reclaim Shakespeare Company plans to stage a protest against BP sponsorship at the British Museum this weekend

'O teach me how I should forget to think': Schools to receive £140,000 from government to stage Shakespeare plays on Bard's 450th anniversary

Thousands of children are to be given the chance to stage a Shakespeare play in a theatre to mark the 450th anniversary of the Bard's birth in 2014.

Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber calls on Government for 'serious investment' in arts education

Andrew Lloyd Webber has become the latest cultural heavyweight to take aim at the Government over its education policy, saying funding arts in schools has produced “enormous returns” for the Treasury.

There's something in the air in Stratford

The nights are long, the weather's miserable and you're starting to feel sure that the sun has, finally, after 4.57 billion years, decided it is done with shining.

Archbishop of York climbs aboard giant Noah's Ark

The Archbishop of York has inspected the final preparations for an event billed as Britain's biggest outdoor theatre production.

New exhibition stresses Shakespeare's relevancy to today

Anyone wondering whether Shakespeare's plays are relevant today could do worse than visiting a new exhibition at London's British Museum dedicated to the "Bard", and, more importantly, the world in which he lived.

Dom Joly: Hell isn't other people. It's an evening at the theatre

Last week, continuing my rolling tour, annoying the British public for my new hidden- camera show, we rolled into Stratford-upon-Avon. As everyone knows, this is one of the UK's major tourist destinations (one of the reasons we were filming there). As the cameras rolled, however, I couldn't help feeling a little sorry for the international visitors. To put it bluntly, there isn't much to see in Stratford. Visitors wander around trying to ignore the expensive temptations of every retail chain in existence, while occasionally stumbling upon an old house that Shakespeare was supposed to have been born in or sampled his first doughnut in. Other than that, there are a couple of statues and the opportunity to brave the homicidal swans and go for a boat ride on the river Avon.

Royal Shakespeare Company: Julius Caesar

Enjoy a three-course meal in the RSC’s Rooftop Restaurant and Bar, followed by a performance in the Royal Shakespeare Theatre for just £40 per person

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Indiana serial killer? Man arrested for murdering teenage prostitute confesses to six other murders - and police fear there could be many more

A new American serial killer?

Police fear man arrested for murder of teen prostitute could be responsible for killing spree dating back 20 years
Sweetie, the fake 10-year-old girl designed to catch online predators, claims her first scalp

Sting to trap paedophiles may not carry weight in UK courts

Computer image of ‘Sweetie’ represented entrapment, experts say
Fukushima nuclear crisis: Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on - and may never return home

Return to Fukushima – a land they will never call home again

Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on from nuclear disaster
Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize
Online petitions: Sign here to change the world

Want to change the world? Just sign here

The proliferation of online petitions allows us to register our protests at the touch of a button. But do they change anything?
Ed Sheeran hits back after being labelled too boring to headline festivals

'You need me, I don’t need you'

Ed Sheeran hits back after being labelled too boring to headline festivals
How to Get Away with Murder: Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama

How to Get Away with Murder

Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama
A cup of tea is every worker's right

Hard to swallow

Three hospitals in Leicester have banned their staff from drinking tea and coffee in public areas. Christopher Hirst explains why he thinks that a cuppa is every worker's right
Which animals are nearly extinct?

Which animals are nearly extinct?

Conservationists in Kenya are in mourning after the death of a white northern rhino, which has left the species with a single male. These are the other species on the brink
12 best children's shoes

Perfect for leaf-kicking: 12 best children's shoes

Find footwear perfect to keep kids' feet protected this autumn
Anderlecht vs Arsenal: Gunners' ray of light Aaron Ramsey shines again

Arsenal’s ray of light ready to shine again

Aaron Ramsey’s injury record has prompted a club investigation. For now, the midfielder is just happy to be fit to face Anderlecht in the Champions League
Comment: David Moyes' show of sensitivity thrown back in his face by former Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson

Moyes’ show of sensitivity thrown back in his face... by Ferguson

Manchester United legend tramples on successor who resisted criticising his inheritance
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2015

UK city beats Vienna, Paris and New York to be ranked seventh in world’s best tourist destinations - but it's not London