Property

Gardeners have a habit of going on about their planting disasters, instead of celebrating their successes, says our green-fingered correspondent...

'Jurassic' record

Jurassic Park has taken more than pounds 24m in three weeks at the British box office to displace Ghost, on pounds 23m over three years, as the biggest grossing film here. The Steven Spielberg thriller has been seen by an estimated 8.5 million Britons.

If you can't stand the velociraptor, get out of the kitchen: From Stephen Spielberg, a summer of prehistoric hypt and terror in Jurassic park, America is already in its grip; on 16 July it begins to eat in Britain. A shaken Peter Pringle reports from New York

THE 10-year-old boy emerged from the cinema, squinted into the afternoon sunlight, and looked up at his mother. 'It could have been less gory,' he observed in a rather dignified, grown-up manner, considering what he had just seen. Another, smaller boy came out clutching his mother's hand. She said, 'Do you know, Marvin, you held my hand so tightly all the way through?' The boy ignored her, still holding on as if his next breath depended on it.

Letter: Misguided patriot games

Sir: Paul Howell (Sports Letters, 18 February) raises a wider issue than the inspirational effect of what he describes as the 'English anthem'. The question that should be addressed is not about the musical qualities of the piece, but about England's right to assume the anthem of the Union as their own. Is it that the English, as a nation, have no particular identity other than as an element of the United Kingdom? As for the team outfits sported by many English representative sides: can someone explain why they include blue? Surely the governing bodies of football and rugby union are not claiming English ownership of the Union flag? If they are, then the blue represents the Scottish element of that Union and therefore has no place on an English team kit.

THEATRE / Down in the depths of passion: The Deep Blue Sea - Almeida Theatre

When Terence Rattigan's The Deep Blue Sea was last revived in London, Penelope Keith took the lead as Hester Collyer, the judge's wife who is living in sin with (and helplessly besotted by) a shallow former test-pilot who can't adjust to the post-war world. Her performance was an instructive failure. While it is eminently possible to picture Keith giving a brisk, no- nonsense pep talk to a woman who had tried to gas herself through failed love, the imagination rebels at the idea of her being in that position herself. Her limitations made you appreciate the range required of an actress in this role: from the tragi-comedy of compromised gentility to the obsessive, self-destructive passion of a Fifties Phedre. One of nature's bucklers-to, Keith pulled herself together beautifully without having first torn herself apart.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 30 January 2015
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Isis hostage crisis

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English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

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