News Christians march in the streets in 2012, calling for reforms of Pakistan's blasphemy laws

Paranoid schizophrenic Mohammed Asghar is described as “pale, dehydrated, shaking and barely lucid"

Baroness Warsi has responsibility for faith communities

Persecution threatens 'extinction' of Christianity in ancient homelands, warns Baroness Warsi

Christianity is threatened by extinction in some parts of the world where Christian communities are persecuted because they are a minority, a Government minister has warned.

An audience with the Pope: a who's who of British politics attend an address by Pope Benedict XVI at Westminster Hall, in 2010

Onward cabinet soldiers!

The Tory Minister for Faith, Baroness Warsi, has scant proof to support her claim that religion has been ushered back into Whitehall by Coalition 'Do Godders'

The site where Lee Rigby was killed outside the Royal Artillery Barracks in Woolwich

Muslim soldiers to visit schools to try to counter Islamophobia

Ministers hope measures will help to tackle  prejudice in the wake  of Lee Rigby’s death

The immigration raids have angered Doreen Lawrence

Even her appointment to the House of Lords can't curtail Doreen Lawrence’s campaigning spirit

The UK is woefully short of authentic black voices in politics and, once in power,  careerism often pulls ambitious black politicians away from their value system

Islamist cleric Anjem Choudary

Ofcom examines appearance of Islamic cleric Anjem Choudary in TV coverage of Lee Rigby murder

Ofcom has launched an investigation into whether appearances by the radical Islamic cleric Anjem Choudary on BBC, ITV and Channel 4 after the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby were editorially justified.

Ministers should be given annual performance appraisals, says former head of civil service

Ministers should be given annual performance appraisals to see how well they are doing their jobs, a former head of the civil service said today.

Question Time: Can't the BBC allow us one hour of unashamedly highbrow televison?

We no longer have reasoned arguments between people who know what they're talking about, interspersed with intelligent contributions from the audience

Baroness Warsi, Britain’s most senior Muslim minister

Baroness Warsi: Fewer than one in four people believe Islam is compatible with British way of life

Fewer than one in four people now believe that following Islam is compatible with a British way of life, Britain's most senior Muslim minister will warn today.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: Rio was right, but he'll pay the price

Four cheers for Rio Ferdinand. The disagreeable Chelsea football captain, John Terry, called QPR player Anton Ferdinand a "f***ing black c***" during a match last autumn and was fined £220,000 and banned for four games. That's all folks, some pocket money taken and a bit of time off to swig champagne for breakfast.

Baroness Warsi cleared over Lords expenses

Tory chairman Baroness Warsi has been cleared of abusing expenses by claiming for overnight stays at a property she was using for free.

Steve Richards: Sayeeda Warsi's problem
is that her job just doesn't matter enough

Modern parties make it impossible for anyone to be

a wholehearted success as chairman

Warsi investigation 'to pick up loose ends'

An inquiry in to whether Conservative Party co-chairman Baroness Warsi breached the ministerial code will pick up any loose ends, Prime Minister David Cameron said today. 

Committee claims rights laws leave out Christians

Britain's equality laws have disadvantaged Christians and increased community tensions, according to a cross-party committee of Christian MPs and Peers published today.

Amol Rajan: A brutal price still paid for daring to challenge faith

FreeView from the editors at i

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: Theresa May has taught me how to hate again

Did you watch and listen to THAT woman, Theresa May, last week? I did, live at the Tory party conference in Manchester, while pressing my bitten nails into my hands and building up such fantasies of violence that they could imprison me for thought crimes under our anti-terrorism laws. There wasn't much applause for the first part of her speech, so she threw them immigrants and asylum-seekers and then the Human Rights Act (HRA) to tear into. Members turned into noisy hounds and May was riding high. Until Ken Clarke pulled her off the horse. He is set to be punished by the PM, who obviously backs May's inciting horn calls.

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