Life and Style

The odds are stacked against the Wright Brothers. First of all, their latest restaurant is in Spitalfields Market, which nobody aged 30 or over should ever be seen near. Second, this is a seafood place, and I've just come back from Italy and Cornwall, where I had so much fish that the thought of another crustacean makes me ill. Third, this restaurant is out and proud about its crustacea – which means you have the dubious pleasure of seeing them fighting in huge tanks barely two metres from the seating area. Fourth, this opening is part of a chain (the third of its kind in the capital, following openings in Soho and Borough market), and your correspondent demands higher standards from chains. Fifth, I am in an extremely foul mood, had you not twigged, having just had my latest in a series of contretemps with a fellow journalist.

Portfolio: Natthawat Wongrat photographs the annual feast of Lopburi's crab-eating macaques

The province of Lopburi, 150km north-east of Bangkok, is famous for the hundreds of crab-eating macaques that overrun its Old Town – including the 13th-century temple of Phra Prang Sam Yot.

Wines of the week: The best low or reduced alcohol wines

Terry Kirby selects the best bottles to buy

'What's the weirdest restaurant you've ever visited?'

Tombs: this weird restaurant in Ahmedabad, India is famous for its milk tea and the tombs between the tables. The owner, who claims to have opened the restaurant 40 years ago, says he does not know who is buried there.

Large breeding snails of the 'gros gris' variety in Helen Howard's production unit

Snails? Farmers just can’t keep up with demand from British diners

Heliculturists have increased production 25-fold since 2000. Cahal Milmo meets some and finds out why more home cooks and chefs are shelling out

Festive cheer: The 12 bottles of Christmas

From sparklers to the dessert wines, Terry Kirby reveals the drinks that will get you in the festive spirit...

New species of terrifying looking 'skeleton shrimp' discovered

The omnivorous ocean-dwellers are thankfully only a few millimetres in length

Face facts: Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux in 'Blue Is the Warmest Colour'

Blue Is the Warmest Colour review: 'A searingly frank and intimate account'

The sex scenes are very frankly shot but almost every other scene has the same level of detail and nuance, writes Geoffrey Macnab

Carnivore's dream: 10 best meat and fish boxes

You’ve heard of veg boxes, but why not get your carnivorous treats delivered as well? Here’s the pick of providers who can keep you stocked with seasonal British produce every night of the week

Bowled over: Raise a glass to the Ashes series with Terry Kirby's pick of Australian wines

The greatest contest in cricket – the Ashes series between England and Australia – starts this week; the perfect excuse to try some exceptional Aussie wines from vineyards near the Test venues…

It's a clamity! Ming the clam, the world's oldest animal, killed at 507 years old by scientists trying to tell how old it was

Ming the clam was first discovered in 2006 and killed by scientists unaware of its age. Recent advances have revised Ming's age upwards by 103 years

Restaurant review: Padstow might belong to Rick Stein but Rock's top chef Nathan Outlaw operates by his own rules

Outlaw's at St Enodoc, St Enodoc Hotel, Rock Road, Rock, Cornwall

Paperback review: The Guard, By Peter Terrin

The Beckett-like circularity of Harry and Michel’s existence, working as guards in the basement of a luxury apartment block that they are never allowed to leave, gives us a new kind of hell in Terrin’s darkly comic, futuristic satire on the difference between a post-apocalyptic “elite” and those who are paid to protect them.

Paperback review: The Fishing Fleet: Husband-Hunting in the Raj, By Anne de Courcy

Who were the women who set out on 16-week-long journeys, courting sickness and even death, all the way from England to India in search of a husband? As de Courcy points out, from 1851 to 1911, approximately one in three of all women aged between 25 and 35 was unmarried.

Paperback review: The Fishing Fleet: Husband-Hunting in the Raj, By Anne de Courcy

Who were the women who set out on 16-week-long journeys, courting sickness and even death, all the way from England to India in search of a husband? As de Courcy points out, from 1851 to 1911, approximately one in three of all women aged between 25 and 35 was unmarried.

Paperback review: The Day Parliament Burned Down, By Caroline Shenton

The day that Parliament didn’t burn down despite the best attempts of Guy Fawkes, 5 November, has overshadowed somewhat the day that it actually did.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 30 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee