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London's housing boom is pushing businesses out of the West End, a leading commercial property advisor has warned.

Blair meeting with troops in Basra, Iraq in 2003

Poll: Do you think the barman who tried to arrest Tony Blair for war crimes was justified?

A barman in a hip east London restaurant tried to arrest former prime minister Tony Blair on Friday night, saying he was performing the arrest over the decision to launch "an unprovoked war" against Iraq in 2003.

Karen Millen chief hails London tradition after Christmas record

The boss of Karen Millen has revealed how London is key to the company’s record trading over Christmas because of the fashion brand’s decision to continue making all its clothes in-house and in the heart of the capital.

David Cameron relaxes visa restrictions for tech talent

New measures to stimulate growth of London's digital sector coincide with the third birthday of the government backed Tech City

Café Murano: Restaurant review - Angela Hartnett's latest is worthy of its Michelin-starred sister up the road

When the Italian restaurant brings you focaccia and a bowl of olive oil, do you groan inwardly? It has become a standard-issue "freebie", but the olive oil is standard issue itself all too often. At Café Murano, the oil is so good that I could quite happily drink it (from Planeta, it's grassy and refined).

Calderwood in 2010; his latest hotel has just opened in Shoreditch

Alex Calderwood: Hotelier and self-styled ‘cultural engineer’ who gave his Ace chain a distinctively unconventional and offbeat style

Alex Calderwood was the co-founder of the Ace Hotel chain, which had just opened its latest venture only six weeks ago in Shoreditch, London. His body was found in one of the rooms of that hotel; the exact cause of his death is still to be determined.

Restaurant review: Angela Hartnett is at the helm of Shoreditch's latest high-ticket opening, the Merchants Tavern

Merchants Tavern, 36 Charlotte Road, London, EC2 (020-7060 5335)

Fatai Rolling Dollar: Pioneer of highlife music

Fatai Rolling Dollar was a guitarist, percussionist, singer and songwriter. In a career that spanned some 64 years, he did a great deal to popularise highlife music in Nigeria, especially during his most active period in the 1960s and 1970s. He emerged in the 1950s but subsequently suffered three and a half decades in the wilderness before making a comeback, topped off with guest appearances on Tony Allen's 2005 album Lagos No Shaking.

Computer code courses for children target global expansion

A Google-backed London start-up that teaches primary school children computer coding is expanding overseas after being flooded with requests to set up spin-offs across the world.

Victoria Pendleton, Shahanur Rahman,10, from Rotherfield Primary School, Jamie Oliver, Ellie May Farrelly,10, from Rotherfield Primary School and Kirstie Allsopp at a Jamie Oliver Food Revolution Day street party.

Jamie Oliver says unhealthy packed lunches are tantamount to 'child abuse'

Jamie Oliver has compared unhealthy packed lunches with child abuse and said the Government should do more to improve school meals.

Review: The Clove Club, Shoreditch Town Hall, 380 Old Street, London EC1

You don't have to be a hipster to dine at The Clove Club – just open the door (if you can)

Between the Covers 17/02/2013

Your weekly guide to what's really going on inside the world of books

Between the covers: 10/02/2013

Your weekly guide to what's really going on inside the world of books

Gemma McCluskie's mutilated body was found floating in the Regent's Canal in east London

Brother jailed for life for murdering ex-EastEnders actress Gemma McCluskie before dumping body in canal

The brother of former EastEnders actress Gemma McCluskie was today sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum term of 20 years for killing her.

Gemma McCluskie went missing in March

Former EastEnders actress Gemma McCluskie 'was killed after row about overflowing sink'

Former EastEnders actress Gemma McCluskie was beaten to death by her brother after a row over an overflowing sink, a court heard today.

A monochrome licence is £49, around one third the cost of a colour licence

Thousands are still turned on by black and white tellies

When describing purchasers of the latest media gadgetry we speak of the tech-savvy “early adopters” and the more mainstream “late adopters”. But there are also those who still like nothing more than to settle down for the evening in front of the old black and white telly.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent