Arts and Entertainment

Some great authors have published their worst works from beyond the grave. A few though, keep getting better when they’re dead, such as the Chilean novelist and short story writer, Roberto Bolaño. His seminal five-part novel, 2666, came out posthumously, won the National Book Critics Circle Award and convinced the world he was not just a master of the short form but could put out his life’s best work at nearly 900 pages, even after death.

Invisible Ink: No 208 - Jerome K Jerome

Some authors vanish in plain sight, recalled by their most successful work, which comes to define an entire career. A friend of mine has written mytho-logies, Victoriana, crime and magical realism, but publishers are unable to mention her without inserting the title of her greatest success into her name, in the way that pantomime stars are bracketed by their TV shows. Typecasting is a problem that afflicts most successful writers.

Hilary Mantel is turning her attention to Margaret Thatcher for her next book

Hilary Mantel turns to Lady Thatcher as inspiration for next book

Hilary Mantel, twice winner of the Man Booker Prize, who made her name dissecting the 16th-century court intrigues of King Henry VIII’s adviser Thomas Cromwell, is turning her attention to a more modern politician – Lady Thatcher.

One minute with: Evie Wyld, novelist

Where are you now and what can you see?

Crazy Rich Asians, By Kevin Kwan: Book review

Superficial but fun, this satire describes life for Chinese old money and nouveaux

Gregory Crewdson, By Gregory Crewdson - Review

The very ethos of his practice is rooted in a 1960s American obsession with the implications of space travel and, with that, an embedded fear of otherness,” writes the Guggenheim’s Nancy Spector in her introduction to this 30-year retrospective of Crewdson’s work.

Invisible Ink: No 201 - John Moore

How can you become so famous that they name two schools, the wing of a hospital, a museum and a pub after you ... and then be totally forgotten? That’s the puzzle surrounding John Moore, novelist and countryman. He was born in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, seven years before the Great War, and he remained out of the limelight following rural pursuits all his life. However, he was one of the best known and loved writers about the countryside in the 20th century, and was widely published in America, Australia and New Zealand.

American short story writer, Claire Vaye Watkins , wins Dylan Thomas Prize

American short story writer Claire Vaye Watkins is the 2013 winner of the Dylan Thomas Prize for new writers.

Bret Easton Ellis isn't a fan of Nobel laureate Alice Munro

Bret Easton Ellis attacks 'overrated' Nobel Prize in Literature winner Alice Munro

The American Psycho author says the award is a 'joke'

A literary hot tub on offer at Wigtown Book Festival

Book lovers will be able to share a jacuzzi with the literati for the first time

An early, explicit short story by Ian McEwan has been discovered after 30 years

Explicit Ian McEwan short story rediscovered after 30 years

The story concerns a woman who asks a doctor to take revenge on her promiscuous husband by removing his bladder, tongue and genitalia

Review: The Windsor Faction, By D J Taylor

Oh! What an unfamiliar war

Invisible Ink: No 189 - When books become brands

Like it or not, authors are popularised by their most famous creations and, when films are produced from them, the work becomes a brand, so Conan Doyle is feted for Holmes alone and Arthur C Clarke is simply the 2001 man. There are 23 Jane Eyre movies, and after the recent Chinese ballet version at Sadler's Wells, I daresay No 24 is planned.

Liola at the National Theatre

Theatre review: Liola - An unexpected delight from the National

Pirandello described this play as a comedy “full of songs and sunshine...so light-hearted it doesn't seem like one of my works” and, to be sure, it will come as quite a surprise to anyone expecting the usual tricksy, meta-theatrical meditations on the relativity of truth and the deceptiveness of personal identity et al.

Review: The Illusion of Separateness, By Simon van Booy

Beauty lies buried under brutal history

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Forget little green men - aliens will look like humans, says Cambridge University evolution expert

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