Arts and Entertainment

Where are you now and what can you see? I am at home on a winter morning. It is still dark and the ferry has its lights on as it comes across the water.

Isabella Sorley, 23, and John Nimmo, 25, arrive at Westminster Magistrates Court, London

Two guilty of sending 'menacing' tweets to Caroline Criado-Perez

Two people have pleaded guilty to sending "menacing" tweets to a feminist campaigner following her successful campaign to ensure a woman features on British banknotes.

5 more important ways that Nick Griffin is bankrupt

The leader of the BNP Nick Griffin was yesterday declared bankrupt. He doesn't own a house, and has run out of money. But there are some other, probably more important things that the far-right politician lacks...

News from Berlin, By Otto de Kat (Translated by Ina Rilke) - Review

It’s wartime, 1941. Dutch diplomat Oscar Verschuur’s family are dispersed throughout Europe. He is posted in Switzerland, his wife Kate volunteers in a London hospital and his daughter Emma is married to Carl, a “good” German, and is based in Berlin.

Money alert: Plastic fivers and tenners

The Bank of England has confirmed that the next £5 and £10 banknotes will be printed on polymer, a thin flexible plastic film, rather than on the cotton paper currently used.

An audience with the Pope: a who's who of British politics attend an address by Pope Benedict XVI at Westminster Hall, in 2010

Onward cabinet soldiers!

The Tory Minister for Faith, Baroness Warsi, has scant proof to support her claim that religion has been ushered back into Whitehall by Coalition 'Do Godders'

Book review: The Blunders of our Governments, By Anthony King and Ivor Crewe

The Blunders of our Governments would have been a compelling if uncomfortable read at any moment (and for any governing party) during the past half century or so. But Professor Anthony King and Sir Ivor Crewe’s analysis of the persistent incompetence of our ruling classes is especially pertinent right now. Indeed, in their postscript, they suggest that David Cameron’s administration, far from learning from his predecessors, “may turn out to be the most blunder-prone government of modern times”.

Donald Macintyre's Sketch: Up close and personal: Evans’ resignation speech was tough on everyone

Even crusty journalists have displayed a heart which I have never before witnessed

Nigel Evans makes a personal statement to MPs in the House of Commons

'I will see this through to the end': MP Nigel Evans protests his innocence over rape and sex charges

Alleged offences span a period of a decade and are said to have taken place in London and Lancashire

James Moore: A new note – in more ways than one

Outlook Forget the gold standard. Britain's currency is about to go plastic. No, the Bank of England is not suggesting linking sterling to the price of plastic, if there were such a thing.

MoD to sell old War Office building

The Ministry of Defence is to sell one of its historic Whitehall buildings as part of a money-saving drive.

The News Matrix: Thursday 15 August 2013

Cameron’s Cabinet to meet in Scotland

Chris Bryant is the kind of clever-clever type that people long to see taking a pratfall

Andy McSmith's Sketch: Some will see only the pratfall, but Chris Bryant has got hold of the agenda

Sketch: When attacking an organisation that big, it is not a bad idea to be in command of your facts

Stop touching Churchill or Thatcher, MPs told (their statues, that is)

Touching statues of the former prime ministers is a gesture believed to bring good luck but is causing wear and tear

English novelist Jane Austen from an original family portrait

Jane Austen emerges as front-runner to replace Charles Darwin on £10 note

Announcement follows row over choice of Sir Winston Churchill to appear on £5 notes in place of one of only two women selected since historical figures were introduced in 1970

Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
Arts and Entertainment
The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
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Sport
footballShirt then goes on sale on Gumtree
Voices
Terry Sue-Patt as Benny in the BBC children’s soap ‘Grange Hill’
voicesGrace Dent on Grange Hill and Terry Sue-Patt
Arts and Entertainment
Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
music
Arts and Entertainment
Twin Peaks stars Joan Chen, Michael Ontkean, Kyle Maclachlan and Piper Laurie
tvName confirmed for third series
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Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine