Arts and Entertainment

Singer will reveal venues from Lianne LaHavas' apartment

Still here baby, still ready : ARTS : SHOWPEOPLE BARRY WHITE

THEY call him the Love God. The Sultan of Bedroom Soul. The Doctor of Love. The Sex Guru. The Walrus of Love. The Mountain of Mounting. The Pachyderm of Passion. The great big wobbly jelly of . . . well, you can make up your own nickname; everyone else does. Barry White - like that other middle-aged, middle-of-the-road Barry, Mr Manilow - is an international superstar who is not taken entirely seriously. The talents of the child gangster who grew up to record "Can't Get Enough of Your Love, Babe"

JAZZ / Tired roots?: Phil Johnson on Maceo Parker at the New Trinity, Bristol

James Brown may be to blame for refusing to let his band wear frilly shirts on stage, but in their dark lounge suits Maceo, Pee Wee Ellis and Fred Wesley - the Holy Trinity of ex-JBs horn-men - now look like seriously middle-aged representatives of the party machine. Maceo, his slightly excessive sideburns signalling his role as leader, takes the stage first and carefully manages the opening number so that it not only showcases his alto sax but also allows him to test the mikes and the lights for the rest of the front-line. When tenor-player Pee Wee and trombonist Fred join him, they gather at the front for a vocal caucus, whispering funky imprecations to the house before taking up their instruments and beginning the sound that launched a thousand samples, tight horn- punches provoking spasms of movement in every listener.

Racing: Remittance Man's sparkling return

THE biggest cheer of the day, if not the season, was Remittance Man's due when he won the Emblem Chase here yesterday. The 10-year-old returned to competition after injury in sparkling fashion with a three-and- a-half-length defeat of Deep Sensation.

Racing: Man marked for return

NICKY HENDERSON confirmed yesterday that Remittance Man will run in the Emblem Chase at Kempton on Saturday. The champion two- mile chaser of 1991-92 has not been on a racecourse since injuring his off-fore tendon in the Peterborough Chase at Huntingdon at the beginning of last season.

Racing: Gifford hit

JOSH GIFFORD'S stable has been badly hit by an outbreak of coughing and the Findon trainer pulled out six horses from their Boxing Day engagements. A stable spokesman said: 'The six horses are not really sick but they all have a bit of a cough and it's not possible to run them today. Deep Sensation is all right for his run in the Castleford Chase at Wetherby.'

RECORDS / New release: Miles Davis and Quincy Jones: Live at Montreux (Warner, CD / tape)

Davis had only a few weeks to live when he played the old Gil Evans arrangements in front of a 50-piece orchestra conducted by Quincy Jones at the 1991 Montreux Jazz Festival. His frailty made it obvious that the occasion was in the nature of a farewell to triumphs that he had not revisited in 30 years. The performance needed only to be adequate for the emotions to flow. For which, many thanks to Jones, and to Gil Goldstein, who transcribed Evans's work from the original recordings. On disc, though, the perception is different. When we can listen to the pristine, indelible originals, why spend time with smudged copies? The mix over-emphasises the double bass of the (blameless) Mike Richmond, and fails to repair the climactic 'Solea', on which Carlos Benavent's performance of the pivotal bass riff was undermined by a sharp G-string. So, uniqueness notwithstanding, it's hard to recommend the CD; the video, due shortly, may be another matter.

MUSIC / Whatever happened to wossisname?: Giles Smith on Prince at the Birmingham NIA

'WHAT'S my name?' Prince kept asking during the first night of his European Tour in Birmingham. 'Prince,' we all shouted back, 'so shut up and get on with it.' It's been a tedious couple of months since Prince announced he was changing his name to a symbol, without so much as a hint on pronunciation. Odd to see the greatest pop performer of our times distracted by one of the daftest publicity stunts in history.

RIFFS / Heart-drenching stuff: Soul singer Dina Carroll on 'Wish It Would Rain' by the Temptations

'Wish It Would Rain' is a really sad ballad about a man who is torn apart. His woman has run off with someone else and he's really feeling terrible, he wants to cry so much but he feels that a man isn't supposed to cry. So he's praying - or rather singing - for it to rain, so he can go outside and cry and nobody will notice. He sings 'Sunshine, blue skies, please go away / My girl has found another and gone away / I know to you it might sound strange / But I wish it would rain / Because raindrops will hide my teardrops / And no one will ever know that I'm crying when I go outside'.

Racing: Waterloo Boy digs deepest to take the Tingle Creek: Brough Scott at Sandown Park

IT'S THE winner's look. A set of the head, a tilt of the neck which says that nothing comes past without sinews being stretched to the very limit. No horse better symbolises it at the moment than Waterloo Boy. No course tests him like Sandown.

Racing: Ribbonwood, an easy Newbury winner

Ribbonwood, an easy Newbury winner, is a John Gosden entry for Friday's Prestige Stakes for two-year-old fillies. Other possibles for the Group
News
US comedian Bill Mahr
people
Voices
Winston Churchill, then prime minister, outside No 10 in June 1943
voicesA C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
News
Rowan Atkinson at the wheel of his McLaren F1 GTR sports car
people
News
The artist Grayson Perry in an example of his trademark headgear
people
Sport
football
News
Tangerine Dream Edgar Froese
people
News
Rob Lowe
peopleRob Lowe hits out at Obama's snub of Benjamin Netanyahu
News
Davies (let) says: 'Everybody thought we were having an affair. It was never true!'
people'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Arts and Entertainment
Over their 20 years, the band has built a community of dedicated followers the world over
music
News
Staff assemble outside the old City Road offices in London
mediaThe stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century at Britain's youngest paper
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us