Arts and Entertainment

Singer will reveal venues from Lianne LaHavas' apartment

Still here baby, still ready : ARTS : SHOWPEOPLE BARRY WHITE

THEY call him the Love God. The Sultan of Bedroom Soul. The Doctor of Love. The Sex Guru. The Walrus of Love. The Mountain of Mounting. The Pachyderm of Passion. The great big wobbly jelly of . . . well, you can make up your own nickname; everyone else does. Barry White - like that other middle-aged, middle-of-the-road Barry, Mr Manilow - is an international superstar who is not taken entirely seriously. The talents of the child gangster who grew up to record "Can't Get Enough of Your Love, Babe"

JAZZ / Tired roots?: Phil Johnson on Maceo Parker at the New Trinity, Bristol

James Brown may be to blame for refusing to let his band wear frilly shirts on stage, but in their dark lounge suits Maceo, Pee Wee Ellis and Fred Wesley - the Holy Trinity of ex-JBs horn-men - now look like seriously middle-aged representatives of the party machine. Maceo, his slightly excessive sideburns signalling his role as leader, takes the stage first and carefully manages the opening number so that it not only showcases his alto sax but also allows him to test the mikes and the lights for the rest of the front-line. When tenor-player Pee Wee and trombonist Fred join him, they gather at the front for a vocal caucus, whispering funky imprecations to the house before taking up their instruments and beginning the sound that launched a thousand samples, tight horn- punches provoking spasms of movement in every listener.

Racing: Remittance Man's sparkling return

THE biggest cheer of the day, if not the season, was Remittance Man's due when he won the Emblem Chase here yesterday. The 10-year-old returned to competition after injury in sparkling fashion with a three-and- a-half-length defeat of Deep Sensation.

Racing: Man marked for return

NICKY HENDERSON confirmed yesterday that Remittance Man will run in the Emblem Chase at Kempton on Saturday. The champion two- mile chaser of 1991-92 has not been on a racecourse since injuring his off-fore tendon in the Peterborough Chase at Huntingdon at the beginning of last season.

Racing: Gifford hit

JOSH GIFFORD'S stable has been badly hit by an outbreak of coughing and the Findon trainer pulled out six horses from their Boxing Day engagements. A stable spokesman said: 'The six horses are not really sick but they all have a bit of a cough and it's not possible to run them today. Deep Sensation is all right for his run in the Castleford Chase at Wetherby.'

RECORDS / New release: Miles Davis and Quincy Jones: Live at Montreux (Warner, CD / tape)

Davis had only a few weeks to live when he played the old Gil Evans arrangements in front of a 50-piece orchestra conducted by Quincy Jones at the 1991 Montreux Jazz Festival. His frailty made it obvious that the occasion was in the nature of a farewell to triumphs that he had not revisited in 30 years. The performance needed only to be adequate for the emotions to flow. For which, many thanks to Jones, and to Gil Goldstein, who transcribed Evans's work from the original recordings. On disc, though, the perception is different. When we can listen to the pristine, indelible originals, why spend time with smudged copies? The mix over-emphasises the double bass of the (blameless) Mike Richmond, and fails to repair the climactic 'Solea', on which Carlos Benavent's performance of the pivotal bass riff was undermined by a sharp G-string. So, uniqueness notwithstanding, it's hard to recommend the CD; the video, due shortly, may be another matter.

MUSIC / Whatever happened to wossisname?: Giles Smith on Prince at the Birmingham NIA

'WHAT'S my name?' Prince kept asking during the first night of his European Tour in Birmingham. 'Prince,' we all shouted back, 'so shut up and get on with it.' It's been a tedious couple of months since Prince announced he was changing his name to a symbol, without so much as a hint on pronunciation. Odd to see the greatest pop performer of our times distracted by one of the daftest publicity stunts in history.

RIFFS / Heart-drenching stuff: Soul singer Dina Carroll on 'Wish It Would Rain' by the Temptations

'Wish It Would Rain' is a really sad ballad about a man who is torn apart. His woman has run off with someone else and he's really feeling terrible, he wants to cry so much but he feels that a man isn't supposed to cry. So he's praying - or rather singing - for it to rain, so he can go outside and cry and nobody will notice. He sings 'Sunshine, blue skies, please go away / My girl has found another and gone away / I know to you it might sound strange / But I wish it would rain / Because raindrops will hide my teardrops / And no one will ever know that I'm crying when I go outside'.

Racing: Waterloo Boy digs deepest to take the Tingle Creek: Brough Scott at Sandown Park

IT'S THE winner's look. A set of the head, a tilt of the neck which says that nothing comes past without sinews being stretched to the very limit. No horse better symbolises it at the moment than Waterloo Boy. No course tests him like Sandown.

Racing: Ribbonwood, an easy Newbury winner

Ribbonwood, an easy Newbury winner, is a John Gosden entry for Friday's Prestige Stakes for two-year-old fillies. Other possibles for the Group
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