News Nascar legend Dick Trickle

Shortly before he was found dead, Trickle called officers to tell them 'there would be a dead body and it would be his'

Flying finish: Mike Conway smashes into the fence on the last lap of the Indy 500 in 2010; he crashed again at the same place last year

Mike Conway: 'I've had a few big ones and I'm lucky to be here today'

Mike Conway has walked away from oval-racing in the US after two huge crashes

Danica Patrick, driver of the #10 GoDaddy.com Chevrolet

Page 3 Profile: Danica Patrick, US racing driver

Fastest woman on four wheels?

First Night: Drive, Cannes Film Festival

High-octane thriller is the most stylish film in years

Lamont Johnson: Emmy-winning film and television director

An actor who turned director, Lamont Johnson won a reputation in the early 1970s for his finely nuanced, perceptive direction of some interesting projects.

Sport on TV: Fast cars, guns and moonshine. What more could a man want?

So they haven't selected the new Stig from the Stig Farm yet. Top Gear (BBC2, Tuesday) has yet to replace Ben Collins, who outed himself as the show's stormtrooper-lookalike boy racer in his autobiography – an act that was regarded as so abject by the BBC that it was as if Santa Claus had whipped off his fake beard to reveal that he had been Noel Edmonds all along (the clue was in the name).

British Touring Cars: Plato takes crown with double win

Jason Plato wrapped up the British Touring Cars Championship by winning yesterday's first two races at Brands Hatch.

The Week In Radio: Won over by the fast and furious life of Brian

There's a famous Monty Python sketch called Philosophers' Football, in which Greece, represented by Socrates, Archimedes and Plato take on Germany, with Hegel, Kant, Marx and Nietzsche. High culture meets low. It's brilliant. Anyway, I was reminded irresistibly of this when listening to the distinguished art critic Brian Sewell on his passion for stock-car racing. The BBC has a habit, let's call it Stephen Fry syndrome, whereby once they've found a presenter who can do something, they want them to do everything, witness Mark Lawson and Andrew Marr. Good at politics? Here's a history series. A doctor? Why not take on some wildlife, and archaeology while you're at it. Famous for fashion? What about a book programme. It's as though we're suffering some worldwide presenter shortage and all those bright young things emerging from media courses and YouTube simply needn't bother. It's a conundrum. Programme-makers complain that without a big name, their pitch won't get commissioned. Journalists need to prove their versatility. Older presenters cry ageism if they are sidelined. Yet there are times when stretching the talent is justified and Stock Car Sewell was one of them.

Stock Car Sewell, Radio 4<br/>Humph Celebration Concert, Radio 4

The prince of posh goes stock-car racing &ndash; and loves the colours

It's not what to wear if you want Schwarzenegger's job

Note to America's political class: if you are thinking about trying to court blue-collar voters, think twice before parading around in a Burberry coat that probably cost more than one of their family cars.

Piquet eyes move to NASCAR after F1scandal

Brazilian Nelson Piquet is eyeing a move to NASCAR's pickup truck racing series after his stint in Formula One was tainted by a race-fixing controversy with Renault.

Driving Like Crazy, By P J O'Rourke

Diatribes that don't find top gear

Giving women drivers a good name is child's play for Sarah

She's 15, she's fast and is making history in Ginetta Juniors

Everything you need to know about... Nascar

What is it?

The National Association for Stock Car Racing was born out of attempts in the 1920s and 1930s to set land speed records on Daytona Beach in Florida. Yesterday marked the start of the Daytona 500 which marks the beginning of Nascar's 60th season.

Nascar hits the skids

The sporting spiritual home of blue-collar America is running into trouble as both recession-hit car makers and spectators steer clear of the race tracks.

North Carolina: Home of the speed freaks

North Carolina seems a laid-back, gentle place &ndash; until you encounter the 167,000 people watching Nascar races. Rob Crossan jumps in for a 165mph trip around the circuit
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003