Life and Style

Live-streams of meals can attract viewers of thousands night after night - with audiences donating enough money for the host to live on

Robert Burns, 1759 to 1796. Scottish Poet

Page 3 Profile: Robert Burns, Scottish Poet

Ah, Scotland’s favourite son.

Frying the flag: the chef celebrated fish and chips in 'Heston's Great British Food'

Heston's Great British Food, Channel 4 - TV review

A fish supper with a twist as Heston cooks up a classic

I'm a Celebrity 2013: Westlife boy band member Kian Egan

I'm A Celebrity 2013: Westlife's Kian Egan crowned king of the jungle

The Westlife singer beat fashion designer David Emanuel to claim the title

Why yous are less and less likely to be having a barm for your tea: The Southern way of speaking is spreading say researchers...

Study into 'Language Variation and Change' conducted by the University of Manchester reveals spread of Southern words

Five-minute memoir: Christobel Kent recalls a hellish car journey that went from bad to worse

'I looked at the headlines. My world, already teetering, totally caved in'

Leyton Orient manager Russell Slade

The O Zone: With our new coach we played Oldham a day early on ‘Fifa 14’

The O Zone: Behind the scenes at Leyton Orient

Book review: Mount Merrion, By Justin Quinn

Booms and busts – the state of the Irish nation, and the Irish family
Thark at the Park Theatre, London

Theatre review: Thark, Park Theatre, London

Thanks to Feydeau and his followers, we tend to think of farce as the most sex-fuelled of genres, full of randy bourgeois types, bent on bedding one another, who desperately struggle to keep up a front of respectability as the frenzy mounts and their reputations disintegrate with a hurtling, remorseless logic. The improprieties are a good deal less priapic and the pace considerably gentler in the work of Ben Travers, whose 1927 Aldwych farce is now engagingly revived at the Park Theatre by Eleanor Rhode for Snapdragon Productions in Clive Francis's new adaptation. 

Reap what you sow: It's not as difficult as you think to grow peas and squash

One warm, still evening in mid-July I picked the first peas, the first cucumber and the first courgette. My husband was away sailing in the Shetlands. The booty was mine, all mine. I made fat batons of the cucumber and ate them, dipped in hummus, as I sat outside shelling the peas. In the fading light, the rooks sailed in overhead, hundreds of them, chattering, clattering, making for their roost in the alder trees below the house.

Food that will serve up a serious debate

A dinner party with a difference will be serving up quirky dishes like “deconstructed caldo verde” (all the ingredients of soup served dried on a plate) and “the Lusophere Flip” (sous vide fish with sauces from former Portuguese colonies Macau, Goa, Brazil and Angola – which were once poor but are now thriving). The idea is to provoke debate about architecture and cities. “These Planetary Supper Club dinner parties are about getting people talking about the events of our time,” says artist and cook Zack Denfeld of the Center For Genomic Gastronomy, who devised the menus for the event, as part of Lisbon's forthcoming Architecture Triennale. “The fish dish for example is about imagining a more horizontal world where ideas, food and people flow equitably around the Lusophere.” Denfeld will also dish up Cobalt 60 BBQ Sauce (above) created with plants bred from mutations – which questions how we use and abuse intensive agriculture and bioscience in the kitchen.

Food bank recipient 'Brenda' and her one-year-old daughter Mercedes are pictured in the Tower Hamlets food bank Poplar branch

Case study: 'I'm in a lot of debt, and I've been so worried about food'

For those who use them, food banks are a lifeline. Emily Dugan talks to some of those on the breadline in Tower Hamlets

South Gloucestershire and Stroud College

History: Founded in 1960 as Filton Technical College. In February 2012, the college merged with Stroud College and was renamed South Gloucestershire and Stroud College.

Inbee Park had an early start at St Andrews and carded an opening 69

Sticky patch halts Inbee Park's progress at British Open

A roller coaster is how Inbee Park described her day, a rapid climb to the top of the leader board followed by a steep descent and then a birdie to finish. There was a bit of everything as the Korean's quest for the Grand Slam began at the Ricoh Women's British Open here, not least a hint of frailty to balance the otherworldly stuff that saw her rampage into an early lead.

Pakistan bomb attack: Parachinar death toll reaches 57

The twin bomb attack which hit a market in a Shi'ite-dominated region of northwest Pakistan killed 57 people, officials said.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'