Life and Style

The website that aims to let users 'annotate the world's text' has launched its first iPhone app following a spat with Google

Lord Gowrie: The long road to forgiveness

From the presentation speech for the Christopher Ewart-Biggs Memorial Award, at the Irish Embassy in London

Discovering the poetry of perpetual motion

A book in the life of Alain De Botton

Obituary: Marjorie Anderson

IN 1958, taking over from her wartime colleague, Jean Metcalfe, Marjorie Anderson was made the new presenter of the BBC radio programme Woman's Hour. With her smooth, pleasant, cool voice, she would remain in charge for some 16 years, utterly unruffled as the subjects under discussion grew ever more adult, ranging from the contraceptive pill to abortion, from flatulence to frigidity, the menopause to masturbation, and eventually erupting in the first-ever broadcast by the BBC of a dreaded four-letter word beginning with "F".

Books: Petty theft, pornography and pantomime subversion

Prince Charming: A Memoir by Christopher Logue Faber pounds 20

Classical: The Compact Collection - Rob Cowan on the Week's CD Releases

SEARCHING OUT new music to recommend with any degree of genuine enthusiasm is a perennial problem, which is why the latest Thomas Ades CD is such a notable event. EMI's hour-long programme features some of the most challenging, stimulating and entertaining recent repertory to have come my way in years, the earliest being a Chamber Symphony from 1990; the most recent, a sparkling Concerto Conciso that Ades (who is only in his late twenties) completed just last year.

Theatre: The nightmare of youth

SELL OUT

Be on your guard for the third man; Podium

From the British Academy Shakespeare Lecture delivered by the Fellow in English at Trinity College, Cambridge

MONITOR: POET LAUREATE

Verdicts on the appointment of Andrew Motion

Leading article: New laureate won't put our poetry in motion

IF THE position of poet laureate did not exist, new Labour would hardly invent it - it is much too intimately entwined with the Crown and the Establishment to be comfortable. But the country has had a laureate since the days of Charles I, and the previous incumbent, the magnificent Ted Hughes, made the position matter, so the Government has had to find a poet to take up his pen.

How bees shamed the British army

Tuesday Book

First Night: Going underground to search for artists lost in time

The Vertical Line Strand London

Hughes wins top poetry award

THE LATE TED Hughes, the former poet laureate who died last October, was last night named as the winner of the T S Eliot Prize for poetry.

First Night: Poetry prize hopefuls have to play it by ear

TS Eliot Prize Readings Almeida Theatre London
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Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference