Life and Style

The website that aims to let users 'annotate the world's text' has launched its first iPhone app following a spat with Google

Lord Gowrie: The long road to forgiveness

From the presentation speech for the Christopher Ewart-Biggs Memorial Award, at the Irish Embassy in London

Discovering the poetry of perpetual motion

A book in the life of Alain De Botton

Obituary: Marjorie Anderson

IN 1958, taking over from her wartime colleague, Jean Metcalfe, Marjorie Anderson was made the new presenter of the BBC radio programme Woman's Hour. With her smooth, pleasant, cool voice, she would remain in charge for some 16 years, utterly unruffled as the subjects under discussion grew ever more adult, ranging from the contraceptive pill to abortion, from flatulence to frigidity, the menopause to masturbation, and eventually erupting in the first-ever broadcast by the BBC of a dreaded four-letter word beginning with "F".

Books: Petty theft, pornography and pantomime subversion

Prince Charming: A Memoir by Christopher Logue Faber pounds 20

Classical: The Compact Collection - Rob Cowan on the Week's CD Releases

SEARCHING OUT new music to recommend with any degree of genuine enthusiasm is a perennial problem, which is why the latest Thomas Ades CD is such a notable event. EMI's hour-long programme features some of the most challenging, stimulating and entertaining recent repertory to have come my way in years, the earliest being a Chamber Symphony from 1990; the most recent, a sparkling Concerto Conciso that Ades (who is only in his late twenties) completed just last year.

Theatre: The nightmare of youth

SELL OUT

Be on your guard for the third man; Podium

From the British Academy Shakespeare Lecture delivered by the Fellow in English at Trinity College, Cambridge

MONITOR: POET LAUREATE

Verdicts on the appointment of Andrew Motion

Leading article: New laureate won't put our poetry in motion

IF THE position of poet laureate did not exist, new Labour would hardly invent it - it is much too intimately entwined with the Crown and the Establishment to be comfortable. But the country has had a laureate since the days of Charles I, and the previous incumbent, the magnificent Ted Hughes, made the position matter, so the Government has had to find a poet to take up his pen.

How bees shamed the British army

Tuesday Book

First Night: Going underground to search for artists lost in time

The Vertical Line Strand London

Hughes wins top poetry award

THE LATE TED Hughes, the former poet laureate who died last October, was last night named as the winner of the T S Eliot Prize for poetry.

First Night: Poetry prize hopefuls have to play it by ear

TS Eliot Prize Readings Almeida Theatre London
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Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine