News The charity Stonewall revealed its Top 100 Employers list on Wednesday

Organisations to receive recognition from the charity include an NHS Trust, and a housing company

In the studio: Alan Johnston, artist

'I was extending an ever-present engagement with the creation of shadow'

Turner Prize winner Laure Prouvost (centre), and nominees Lynette Yiadom-Boake and David Shrigley in Londonderry

Congratulations to Laure Prouvost, but does the Turner Prize need to reconsider its objectives?

There is an argument that it could become a prize for painting

A view from the top of the new staircase in the Rotunda

A new twist on an old favourite as transformed Tate Britain reopens

After a £45m transformation, the gallery is back to its best with stripped-back features and a  front door opening on to the Thames once more

Architects Peter St John and Adam Caruso have revitalised The Tate's entrance, cafe and gallery spaces in a £45 million refurbishment project

Tate Britain's redesign: It may not be cool but it’s restrained, and elegant, and it works

The transformation of Tate Britain’s core building will seem effortless to many

Tate Britain's new lower level rotunda. Courtesy Caruso St John and Tate

Tate Britain unveils £45m refurbishment

The latest makeover won’t make Tate Britain 'cool', but it has become far more welcoming and architecturally elegant

Sweet success: The impressive colonnaded front of Tate Britain

Rise to the Tate: a great British survivor

As the Tate Britain unveils a new look, Marcus Field tells the story of a building that has endured bombs, floods and meddling architects

Art Under Attack (Tate Britain, 2 Oct to 5 Jan) examines 500 years of assaults on work for religious, political or aesthetic reasons

Coming soon in visual arts: From Australia to Margate

Australia: so much to see, so far to travel. Hence the most satisfying thing about this autumn's calendar is news that a bunch of top curators have edited 200 years of the nation's art and are delivering it to our doorsteps for £14 a ticket. Australia at the Royal Academy, London (21 Sept to 8 Dec), features work by settlers and indigenous people and, best of all, includes four paintings from Sidney Nolan's Ned Kelly series, the source of much mythology and fame.

'Work No. 227: The lights going on and off'

Tate acquires Martin Creed's controversial Turner Prize-winning piece Work No 227

The Tate is to turn the lights back on, and off, on a more regular basis after buying Martin Creed’s controversial Turner Prize winning piece from 2001.

Statue of the Dead Christ c.1500-1520: The damaged statue of Christ that lay hidden for hundreds of years will form the centrepiece of a new exhibition of attacked art at Tate Modern.

Iconoclasm: Tate Britain to showcase art that has been blown up, defaced, dyed and mutilated

The first exhibition exploring the history of British iconoclasm opens in October

Cups and saucers at the Foundling Museum by artist Clare Twomey
Mary Beale (1633-1699) Sketch of the Artist's Son, Bartholomew Beale, Facing

Britain's first female professional painter Mary Beale celebrated in radical Tate Britain rehang

Tate Britain has put on show two newly discovered works by Britain’s earliest professional female painter for the first time, as part of a radical rehang of its collection.

David Shrigley’s fine line between art and fun nominated for Turner Prize

Some people think David Shrigley’s artwork isn’t serious enough to be, well, taken seriously. Yet the artist, noted for the humour that runs through  his comical line drawings, may have the last laugh after being nominated for the Turner Prize.

Kurt Schwitters’ ‘Untitled (Quality Street)’ (1943)

Exhibition of pop art icon Kurt Schwitters to open at Tate Britain

The first major exhibition to focus on artist Kurt Schwitters' life in Britain following his escape from Nazi Germany opens this week.

German in exile: Kurt Schwitters created En Morn in 1947, the year before his death in Ambleside

Visual art preview of 2013: Just the ticket

Schwitters, Manet, Vermeer ... it's set to be a vintage year for art shows, big and small

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Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
general election 2015
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The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
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Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
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Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
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Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
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An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
voicesDave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
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Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
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Buyers of secondhand cars are searching out shades last seen in cop show ‘The Sweeney’
motoringFlares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own