News The charity Stonewall revealed its Top 100 Employers list on Wednesday

Organisations to receive recognition from the charity include an NHS Trust, and a housing company

In the studio: Alan Johnston, artist

'I was extending an ever-present engagement with the creation of shadow'

Turner Prize winner Laure Prouvost (centre), and nominees Lynette Yiadom-Boake and David Shrigley in Londonderry

Congratulations to Laure Prouvost, but does the Turner Prize need to reconsider its objectives?

There is an argument that it could become a prize for painting

A view from the top of the new staircase in the Rotunda

A new twist on an old favourite as transformed Tate Britain reopens

After a £45m transformation, the gallery is back to its best with stripped-back features and a  front door opening on to the Thames once more

Architects Peter St John and Adam Caruso have revitalised The Tate's entrance, cafe and gallery spaces in a £45 million refurbishment project

Tate Britain's redesign: It may not be cool but it’s restrained, and elegant, and it works

The transformation of Tate Britain’s core building will seem effortless to many

Tate Britain's new lower level rotunda. Courtesy Caruso St John and Tate

Tate Britain unveils £45m refurbishment

The latest makeover won’t make Tate Britain 'cool', but it has become far more welcoming and architecturally elegant

Sweet success: The impressive colonnaded front of Tate Britain

Rise to the Tate: a great British survivor

As the Tate Britain unveils a new look, Marcus Field tells the story of a building that has endured bombs, floods and meddling architects

Art Under Attack (Tate Britain, 2 Oct to 5 Jan) examines 500 years of assaults on work for religious, political or aesthetic reasons

Coming soon in visual arts: From Australia to Margate

Australia: so much to see, so far to travel. Hence the most satisfying thing about this autumn's calendar is news that a bunch of top curators have edited 200 years of the nation's art and are delivering it to our doorsteps for £14 a ticket. Australia at the Royal Academy, London (21 Sept to 8 Dec), features work by settlers and indigenous people and, best of all, includes four paintings from Sidney Nolan's Ned Kelly series, the source of much mythology and fame.

'Work No. 227: The lights going on and off'

Tate acquires Martin Creed's controversial Turner Prize-winning piece Work No 227

The Tate is to turn the lights back on, and off, on a more regular basis after buying Martin Creed’s controversial Turner Prize winning piece from 2001.

Statue of the Dead Christ c.1500-1520: The damaged statue of Christ that lay hidden for hundreds of years will form the centrepiece of a new exhibition of attacked art at Tate Modern.

Iconoclasm: Tate Britain to showcase art that has been blown up, defaced, dyed and mutilated

The first exhibition exploring the history of British iconoclasm opens in October

Cups and saucers at the Foundling Museum by artist Clare Twomey
Mary Beale (1633-1699) Sketch of the Artist's Son, Bartholomew Beale, Facing

Britain's first female professional painter Mary Beale celebrated in radical Tate Britain rehang

Tate Britain has put on show two newly discovered works by Britain’s earliest professional female painter for the first time, as part of a radical rehang of its collection.

David Shrigley’s fine line between art and fun nominated for Turner Prize

Some people think David Shrigley’s artwork isn’t serious enough to be, well, taken seriously. Yet the artist, noted for the humour that runs through  his comical line drawings, may have the last laugh after being nominated for the Turner Prize.

Kurt Schwitters’ ‘Untitled (Quality Street)’ (1943)

Exhibition of pop art icon Kurt Schwitters to open at Tate Britain

The first major exhibition to focus on artist Kurt Schwitters' life in Britain following his escape from Nazi Germany opens this week.

German in exile: Kurt Schwitters created En Morn in 1947, the year before his death in Ambleside

Visual art preview of 2013: Just the ticket

Schwitters, Manet, Vermeer ... it's set to be a vintage year for art shows, big and small

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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices