Tbilisi

Miliband visit puts pressure on Georgian leader

The first British government minister to visit Georgia since the Russian invasion made a point of meeting opposition leaders as public discontent over Mikheil Saakashvili’s role in the disaster that has befallen the country began to grow.

Kim Sengupta: 'I don’t know when they will stop the attacks'

Not many countries name the main road from the airport in their capital city "George W Bush Boulevard", but Georgia has gone to great lengths to court the world's one remaining superpower as an insurance policy against the resurgent Russia of Vladimir Putin.

Beleaguered president: Gambler who risked his country and links with

Wearing his trademark dark suit and red tie, Mikheil Saakashvili emerged on to the terrace of his new Presidential Palace into a humid Tbilisi afternoon yesterday to face the world's media. He spoke passionately about the need for the international community to respond to Russia's "invasion" of his country, but for a media-hungry man renowned for his charm and charisma, he looked fatigued and strained.

Georgia claims Russia wants to overthrow government

Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili accused Moscow of trying to overthrow his government today as Russian troops pushed into two separatist regions of his country and rejected a Georgian ceasefire proposal.

Tiny rebel region brings Russia and Georgia to brink of war

By day, the tiny rebel capital of South Ossetia and the villages nearby are often quiet. But, by night, they crackle with gun and mortar fire. The old men who pause under shady trees in Tskhinvali look like pensioners anywhere, passing time and reminiscing. But here they talk of weapons, killing and the prospect of war.

Georgia's leader vows to prevent Russia reviving the Soviet Union

Two photos stand out in the office of the Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili – there's an autographed one of him with his buddy, George Bush; then there's the unsmiling one with his nemesis Vladimir Putin. The body language says it all – the Georgian looks the other way, the Russian disdainfully at the ground. Yet more than anyone else, Mr Putin has defined the presidency of Mr Saakashvili, who came to power in the rose revolution of 2003 promising to bury Georgia's Soviet past.

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100,000 march in Georgia to call for new election

Tens of thousands of opposition supporters marched in the Georgian capital yesterday against what they denounced as massive vote fraud that helped United States-allied Mikhail Saakashvili to win a second presidential term.