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Caught in the net: A high-pitched hometown homage

LA musician Julia Holter (pictured) returns in August with her third album in three years in the shape of Loud City Song. Last year's much praised Ekstasis was a stand-out, full of great experimental baroque pop, strange electronics, fine songwriting and Holter's lovely high-pitched vocal.

The promotional bumf cites Colette and Frank O'Hara as influences on this album themed around Holter's relationship with her hometown, all of which might make one uneasy, but in her skilled hands it should all be OK.

The first track from Loud City Song has been a released and it is an intriguing opening effort. “World” is an extremely sparse affair with those high-end, poised vocals leading the charge over spare hints of synths and strings. The song can be heard with its lo-fi, LA-shot video at youtu.be/BmT7GKPsxto.

Music review: Karl Hyde, Union Chapel, London

Karl Hyde’s debut UK gig as a solo artist shows how far club culture has come. Not as spectacularly, perhaps, as when his veteran dance outfit Underworld helped their old pal Danny Boyle by assembling the soundtrack for last summer’s Olympic Opening Ceremony, 16 years after their “Born Slippy” helped give Trainspotting its propulsive rush. 

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