Travel

My stomach has endured the full scope of awful foods this planet has to offer Trying adventurous food is a big part of travelling, but India, where I'm travelling through now, has more problems with [food] hygiene than anywhere else in the world. It's a cultural problem, as eating meat is a rarity in rural areas, so they treat it like a vegetable, keeping it in a cupboard. So when the occasional Westerner passes through, by the time it's pulled out, it's been in there for a few months. When travelling across poorer parts of India now, I try to survive off rice and dahl.

'God caught her': Teenage girl survives 3,500ft fall after birthday skydiving trip almost turned to tragedy when her parachute failed to open

Makenzie Wethington broke her pelvis, spine, shoulder, several ribs and a tooth in the fall

A picture shows the Qesem Cave excavation site where the campfire was discovered.

300,000-year-old firepit found in Israel could be the first example of a social campfire

The fire-pit found near Tel-Aviv could hold the secret to the beginnings of social culture among early humans

That's one hell of a lot of lycra: The 12 celebrities are in Austria training for new reality TV show, The Jump

The Jump, TV review: A bonkers, scary mash-up of Big Brother and Ski Sunday

An utterly ridiculous but quite heartwarming new show

The 7,000-year-old skeleton; experts were astonished to find a combination of African and European genes in the ancient hunter gatherer

Revealed: First Ol’ Blue Eyes is 7,000 years old and was a caveman living in Spain

DNA analysis of the man’s tooth has also disclosed that he had the dark-skinned genes of an African

If 2013 was the year of the brow, then 2014 is set to be about hot lips

Style File: A moment on the lips

Eye-catching brows are old news. Instead give your beauty look an instant update with a vibrant lip colour, says Naomi Attwood

Not I, performed by Lisa Dwan at The Royal Court Theatre

Book review: "Entry Island" by Peter May

Author Peter May is masterful at making a little go a long way. His acclaimed Lewis trilogy spun three tales of murder and mystery from the unpromising prospects afforded by the Outer Hebrides. In Entry Island, May once again mines this rich Hebridean seam for nuggets; the only difference being that the crime is in the distant past, during the notorious clearances in which profit-hungry landlords brutally removed settled communities from their estates in the Highlands and Islands to replace them with sheep.

Blonde ambition: John Kearns
An artist’s impression of Stone Age men and women butchering a wild horse. Early hunter-gatherers were believed to have avoided issues with tooth decay because of the lack of sticky, sugary food in their diets

Forget crisps and sweets – Stone Age hunter-gatherers found to suffer earliest tooth decay after snacking on pine nuts and acorns

Scientists say they have found the first evidence of rotting teeth to pre-date the invention of farming

'Goodnight, house!': Electronics show CES 2014 promises that the connected home is coming soon

The latest gadgets from the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas promise a world of smart objects that will watch, listen and look after us

Evander Holyfield joins the ‘Celebrity Big Brother’ circus with housemate Luisa Zissman

Alexander Fury: Every haircut is like Sweeney Todd, to me

Why did haircuts have to become a fashion accessory?

Elephant Appeal: The Kenyan canine unit putting elephant poachers off the scent

The business of protecting wildlife has now become an extremely professional and militarised affair

Harriet Walker: Christmas is as close to crawling back into the womb as we’re likely to get

I love Christmas but don’t worry, I’m not going to proselytise about it. I won’t pretend it’s any more than an excuse for gluttony and for corporations to sell people tat they don’t need. I go into the festive period with my eyes open, thanks very much, and I’m more fascinated than I am fanatical. But I do love it.

The National Portrait Gallery has commissioned a portrait of Tony Blair by Alastair Adams

A portrait of Tony Blair – and zealotry

A painting of the former PM for the National Portrait Gallery tells us much about him

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine