Sport

Lancaster believes that stability will provide success with his current contract set to run out after the 2015 Rugby World Cup on home soil

Diary: No love lost at BBC for Oliver

A first for this column, which was quoted on yesterday's Today programme by a gleeful Justin Webb. The source of Webb's amusement was newspaper coverage of Craig Oliver, No10's new spin chief, arriving for work wearing headphones that I described as "denoting a middle-aged man keen to convince passers-by that he was once deeply into hip-hop".

Desmond to run a national health lottery

The media baron Richard Desmond launched The Health Lottery yesterday, a nationwide scheme that he claimed would generate £50m a year for charitable projects outside National Health Service funding.

Business Diary: Chair envy at Channel Five

Divide and rule? There's a certain amount of jealousy to be found just now at the central London headquarters of Richard Desmond's ever-expanding media empire.

It's the pits! Why Bernie hates his new biography

The rags-to-riches romp was simple for writer Tom Bower – until his subject saw a section about his ex-wife

Diary: Jackie Wilson says... Amis is OK

It's a while since Martin Amis wrote a novel of any great renown, but media types remain intent on sniffing out controversy in the poor chap's every utterance. So it was that last week he landed himself in a literary version of the Sky sexism row, with the Keysian contention that he'd only write a children's book if he had "a serious brain injury". Children's authors rushed to condemn him. "Arrogant twaddle," said Lucy Coats. "If he looked at the talent in children's literature he might change his mind," said Anthony Horowitz. "If I gave him £100 to write a children's book I bet he'd do a good one," agreed Roger McGough. Yet Amis has an ally in Jacqueline Wilson, creator of Tracy Beaker, who was today named the most borrowed author of the past 10 years in British libraries. "He's a very committed dad," she tells me. "When one of his daughters was younger, Martin and his wife queued up to get my book signed for her. He was sweet and charming and he's committed to making sure children are brought up reading children's books. He just likes to make dramatic statements." You'd think, with all this publicity, that he might sell a few more books.

DJ Taylor: Freedom's just another word for...

...being rude about Mexicans on 'Top Gear'. Meanwhile, teen sex scenes in the US version of 'Skins' have caused alarm

Anne Hathaway reveals family plan

Anne Hathaway is "dying" to have children.

Terence Blacker: We should hire more people like Miss Rusty, not fire them

It is rather early in the year to be making nominations for the annual Pride of Britain award for heroes of everyday life, but it would be a surprise if there are stronger candidates than the teacher known to her pupils as "Miss Rusty".

Desmond withdraws his titles from press complaints regulation

The publisher Richard Desmond yesterday delivered a damaging blow to supporters of self-regulation of the press by effectively withdrawing his newspapers and magazines from the Press Complaints Commission.

Desmond bids to capture Top of the Pops

It is the formerly much-loved music show that the BBC now only dusts off for special occasions. But the Corporation has vowed to block an audacious bid by the media magnate Richard Desmond to relaunch Top of the Pops on Channel 5.

Ann Murray: Actress and broadcaster whose credits encompass ‘The Archers’ and ‘Star Wars’

Ann Murray, the actress, writer and lecturer, and mother of Christopher Huhne, the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, was the daughter of the founder of Canadian Broadcasting and a well-known broadcaster in this country.

The Feral Beast: Blue times at the Beeb

It wasn't just the airwaves that turned blue on Monday when Today programme presenter James Naughtie became tongue-tied and mispronounced the surname of the Culture Secretary, Jeremy Hunt; an error quickly repeated by Andrew Marr.

Stylist with the key to Lady Gaga's wardrobe

Nicola Formichetti's British Fashion Awards triumph is a belated nod to the industry's unsung heroes
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?