Arts and Entertainment “It's important for us that the show's great every night

The National's latest album saw the Brooklyn outfit facing up to questions of existence. James McNair meets the band on tour

On my first trip to the Big Apple in 1975, I was in time (just) to see Jack Dempsey's joint on Times Square, which I believe was the original for Mindy's in the Runyon stories

There can be no stage musical with a more romantic opening song than Guys and Dolls with Nicely-Nicely Johnson prodding his racing paper and bellowing into the auditorium:

American history in a flash

Boyd Tonkin on how Life was transmuted into Art through the photographe r's lens

Catch a shooting star

Half Haitian, half Puerto Rican, a fluent speaker of Caribbean Spanish, and a jazz expert with a library of more than 3,000 records, Jean- Michel Basquiat epitomised the multilingual power and multifarious stimuli of New York. With a potent bland of cheek, chutzpah and contrariness, Basquiat fused his painting and his persona to turn himself into one of the meteoric symbols of the boom-time Eighties, only then to be seized- upon with equal rapaciousness as one of its first casualties when he died from a heroin overdose at the age of 27, in August 1988.

Let us spray: king of graffiti holds court

"OH YEAH, he's cool," said the fan as she watched her hero, street artist Futura 2000, stroll across one of London's busiest roads undamaged to add a hint of mid-grey to the fuzz of blue he had sprayed on to the billboard a few minutes earlier. Pretty cool by any standards, but in the shake, squirt and scram world of aerosol artists, New York-born Futura is deep in the permafrost. He's King Nozzle.

Going ape in the gender jungle

A female hit squad stalks the streets of New York in gorilla masks looking for sexist curators. Louisa Buck tracks down the Guerilla Girls

Force of nature

Louise Bourgeois - 84, intimidating, ferocious, fragile grande dame of the surreal - talks to Louisa Buck

How We Met: Angela Flowers and Andrew Logan

Angela Flowers, 61, has two galleries in east London, one in central London and one in Ireland, in which she shows the work of more than 30 contemporary artists. Her first husband was the photographer Adrian Flowers; she now lives with the writer Robert Heller. She has five children.

Letter: Spotting the real thing in a surreal world

Sir: May I add several points to your commendable feature article about the frauds in the Dali print world ('Salvador Dali, one in a million', 19 February)?

Picasso experts' rift spills into court action: Signature on pounds 1.1m print is claimed not to be authentic

ONE OF the world's leading print experts is suing another over a Picasso that changed hands between them for dollars 1.68m (pounds 1.1m) in June 1990.

Architecture: The powerhouse for modern art?: Should a brutish industrial relic house the new extension to the Tate Gallery? Jonathan Glancey on the future of Bankside Power Station

What do we do with the massive and sometimes awe-inspiring buildings our industrial past has landed on us? Should Battersea Power Station have been demolished when it became redundant rather than being left to rot? Should Bankside Power Station become London's Museum of Modern Art?

PHOTOGRAPHY / Time to catch up on his paper work: Howard Gilman's collection of photographs is on show for the first time. Paula Weideger reports

HOWARD GILMAN is a private man, and shy. But he's not a recluse; among those who count him as a good friend are Mikail Baryshnikov and Isabella Rossellini. Yet, until now, the paper magnate and art collector has refused requests to meet the press. He's not uppish. He just seems to have no need to give the outside world any evidence that he is 'somebody'. He doesn't even have his perch in a skyscraper eyrie.

Obituary: Lucien Goldschmidt

Lucien Goldschmidt, antiquarian bookdealer, born Brussels 3 March 1912, died New York City 17 December 1992.

Obituary: Edward Warburg

Edward Mortimer Morris Warburg, philanthropist, born White Plains New York 5 June 1908, married Mary Whelan Prue Currier, died Norwalk Connecticut 21 September 1992.
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