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China has accused US media of using the opportunity to 'hype' China threat

A Brief History of the Future, By Stephen Clarke

When Stephen Clarke couldn't get his first three books into print, he self-published them under pseudonyms through a fictional publishing house, Red Garage Books. One, A Year in the Merde, became very successful, and now its stablemate, A Brief History of the Future, is published in paperback by Black Swan. It's a comic science-fiction novel involving the invention of a teleportation machine, gangsters, the Pentagon, a female ex-punk prime minster and the ancestry of Captain James Kirk. I salute Clarke's chutzpah and enterprise, but I have to say that the publishers who rejected it had some reason. It's tame and predictable, with stock characters and without any real tension, and the determinedly facetious style quickly palls.

Errors & Omissions: Who's in charge of the Pentagon? We should be told

The readers of this newspaper are, axiomatically, intelligent, well-informed people – and the thing about intelligent people is not that they know all the answers but that they ask all the questions.

Pentagon lifts military ban on gays

The Pentagon chief, Leon Panetta, has decided to end the ban on gays serving openly in the armed services, admitting that repealing the 17-year-old prohibition will not hurt the military's ability to fight.

Defence files stolen by 'foreign agents'

A foreign intelligence service stole 24,000 files from a US defence contractor in March, Deputy Defence Secretary William Lynn said.

Guru guilty of sweat-lodge deaths

US prosecutors yesterday charged a Marine Corps reservist with shootings at four military buildings around Washington, including the Pentagon, and said they found he had bomb-making materials.

Q: Is it a bird? Is it a plane? A: Neither – it's a microdrone

The enemy might look up and ask if it's a bird, a plane or Superman. Soon, however, it might be a mechanical insect with flapping wings, transmitting sound and images back to commanders in the United States. And if it's not zipping through the air it could instead be perching quietly on a window sill near you.

Pentagon sealed off after arrest

Police closed several roads around the Pentagon in Virginia yesterday after arresting a man whom they found with suspicious materials in his backpack.

Man in custody over suspicious car near Pentagon

Authorities today closed several major highways around the Pentagon while investigating a nearby vehicle, after taking a man into custody.

Pentagon Papers on Vietnam released

Forty years after the explosive leak of the Pentagon Papers, a secret government study chronicling deception and misadventure in the United States's conduct of the Vietnam War, the report was published in its entirety yesterday, including the 11 words that were not published at the time of the leak.

Leading article: Vigilance is the only realistic defence in cyber war

The Ministry of Defence is recruiting hundreds of new cyber specialists, while the Pentagon has decided that an attack on US computer networks from another country may be deemed an act of war, meriting an armed response. Both moves are merely acknowledgement that the internet, once considered a background support system, is now a front line of modern conflict, both commercial and military.

Pentagon warns that cyber-attacks will be seen as 'acts of war'

Hackers who disrupt infrastructure would be target for missiles

Claire Yorke: Cyberspace needs more politics, not less

It would be easy to view cyber attacks as a problem reserved for politicians, technocrats and IT departments. Yet with almost a third of the world's population now online, these attacks can affect national prosperity and security and undermine elements of everyday life, whether by disrupting national transport systems, stealing bank details for financial crime or accessing personal information for fraud.

Lockheed Martin hit by cyber attack

Hackers launched a "significant and tenacious" cyber attack on US defence contractor Lockheed Martin, which holds highly sensitive information, but its secrets remained safe, the company said today.

The not-so-secret operation: Gates hits out at Bin Laden leaks

Careless talk costs lives, the White House warned yesterday, saying that unauthorised leaks about the special forces raid that killed Osama bin Laden are now endangering US troops, harming diplomatic relations and jeopardising the country's ability to carry out similar operations in future.

Leading article: Battle dress

The warrior queen of the Ancient Briton, Boudicca, according to Roman authors, led her forces into battle in full armour. So did Joan of Arc in the 15th century and Isabella of Spain in the 16th century.

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