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As if the police had not already inflicted enough trouble on themselves with the plebgate saga, a Chief Constable had to ‘fess up that his force did not understand the law that protects an MP’s right to speak freely.

British newspapers are split over the Royal Charter proposals

New York Times says Royal Charter harms free speech

Small publishers and websites under threat, says paper that helped expose hacking scandal

Disgraced former cabinet minister Chris Huhne (left), and The Sunday Times political editor, Isabel Oakeshott

Chris Huhne and ex-wife Vicky Pryce face jail as journalist denies helping to entrap former Lib Dem cabinet minister over speeding offence

The journalist who helped expose former Liberal Democrat cabinet minister Chris Huhne for lying along with his ex-wife over a speeding offence insisted today she had not colluded in his entrapment.

Isabel Oakeshott was right to spell out to Pryce the impact of revealing her story

Our writer, a former political  editor of The Mirror and The Sunday Telegraph, on why she would have done the same as Oakeshott in pursuit of a story

What the Sunday papers said

The Bank of England faces a "nail-biting" decision over pumping billions more into the UK recovery this week as figures reveal the still-sluggish impact of its flagship initiative to boost lending. The central bank today unveils the latest results of its Funding for Lending scheme, which allows banks to access cash at a cost of 0.25 per cent. In exchange, the banks have to increase net lending.

Rendall in 2000: he was a gifted, even hypnotic raconteur, but definitely not a gifted gambler

Jonathan Rendall: Writer on boxing and gambling who lived life close to the edge

The theme of Jonathan Rendall's writing life was risk. He came to prominence in the late 1980s as a vital new voice covering that most literary of sports, boxing, and captured in urgent, seductive prose the risk to life and limb that assails a fighter every time he enters the ring. But the risk came closer to home too. Rendall wrote about playing the odds in a book called, ominously, Twelve Grand. The terms of the contract with his publisher were that he would take his advance – the titular £12,000 – and gamble it. It's one measure of how well the gambling paid that later in life he would joke about a sequel called Twelve Quid.

Two arrested over Naomi Oni acid attack, as police investigate claims the Victoria’s Secret shop assistant may have deliberately harmed herself

Man and woman released on bail after being arrested over the weekend on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm

Marie Colvin was among at least 11 people killed yesterday in the bombardment of Homs

The risks are huge, but freelance war correspondents shouldn't be shunned for having the courage to take them

Major broadsheets will no longer accept speculative submissions from Syria

Dame Helen Ghosh

Page 3 Profile: Dame Helen Ghosh, Director-General of the National Trust

More hot air in the wind turbine debate?

Tony Sheridan: Singer and guitarist who was a catalyst in the early career of The Beatles

Tony Sheridan: Singer and guitarist who was a catalyst in the early career of The Beatles

When he went to Hamburg he found that the wild and crazy lifestyle suited him perfectly

Vicky Pryce tells court she 'wished she could turn back clock' after Chris Huhne penalty points saga became headline news

The ex-wife of disgraced politician Chris Huhne said today that she wished she could have turned the clock back after her account of the penalty points saga became headline news.

Almost 250 claims have been settled by News International

Exclusive: Rupert Murdoch accused of targeting Labour staff in dirty tricks campaign

News International settles hacking claims with officials close to Blair government

Rupert Murdoch, News Corp chairman: The report says: “Politicians knew that the prize was personal and political support in his mass circulation newspapers. The value or effect of such support may have been exaggerated, but it has been treated as having real political value nonetheless.”

Rupert Murdoch's Twitter slap-down has big implications - and not just for News Corp editors

The Middle East is already one of the most difficult territories to cover. This well-publicised intervention won't make it any easier

Rupert Murdoch last night personally apologised for a “grotesque, offensive” cartoon in the Sunday Times by Gerald Scarfe

Was Rupert Murdoch right to apologise for Gerald Scarfe's cartoon in the Sunday Times?

The Sunday Times has received complaints of anti-Semitism after a cartoon was published appearing to depict Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu building a brick wall containing the blood and limbs of Palestinians.

Rupert Murdoch last night personally apologised for a “grotesque, offensive” cartoon in the Sunday Times by Gerald Scarfe

Murdoch apologises for 'offensive' Scarfe cartoon in Sunday Times denounced as anti-Semitic

Rupert Murdoch last night personally apologised for a “grotesque, offensive” cartoon in the Sunday Times which has provoked a wave of protest from Jewish organisations who have declared it anti-Semitic.

Frank Keating has died at the age of 75

Frank Keating: Doyen of sportswriters whose work was suffused with wit and and joy

Frank Keating, who has died at the age of 75, was a giant of sports journalism, although as a columnist and feature writer whose work habitually brought out the humanity and humour in a subject, he would have chortled self-mockingly at such a grandiose epitaph.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine