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As if the police had not already inflicted enough trouble on themselves with the plebgate saga, a Chief Constable had to ‘fess up that his force did not understand the law that protects an MP’s right to speak freely.

British newspapers are split over the Royal Charter proposals

New York Times says Royal Charter harms free speech

Small publishers and websites under threat, says paper that helped expose hacking scandal

Disgraced former cabinet minister Chris Huhne (left), and The Sunday Times political editor, Isabel Oakeshott

Chris Huhne and ex-wife Vicky Pryce face jail as journalist denies helping to entrap former Lib Dem cabinet minister over speeding offence

The journalist who helped expose former Liberal Democrat cabinet minister Chris Huhne for lying along with his ex-wife over a speeding offence insisted today she had not colluded in his entrapment.

Isabel Oakeshott was right to spell out to Pryce the impact of revealing her story

Our writer, a former political  editor of The Mirror and The Sunday Telegraph, on why she would have done the same as Oakeshott in pursuit of a story

What the Sunday papers said

The Bank of England faces a "nail-biting" decision over pumping billions more into the UK recovery this week as figures reveal the still-sluggish impact of its flagship initiative to boost lending. The central bank today unveils the latest results of its Funding for Lending scheme, which allows banks to access cash at a cost of 0.25 per cent. In exchange, the banks have to increase net lending.

Rendall in 2000: he was a gifted, even hypnotic raconteur, but definitely not a gifted gambler

Jonathan Rendall: Writer on boxing and gambling who lived life close to the edge

The theme of Jonathan Rendall's writing life was risk. He came to prominence in the late 1980s as a vital new voice covering that most literary of sports, boxing, and captured in urgent, seductive prose the risk to life and limb that assails a fighter every time he enters the ring. But the risk came closer to home too. Rendall wrote about playing the odds in a book called, ominously, Twelve Grand. The terms of the contract with his publisher were that he would take his advance – the titular £12,000 – and gamble it. It's one measure of how well the gambling paid that later in life he would joke about a sequel called Twelve Quid.

Two arrested over Naomi Oni acid attack, as police investigate claims the Victoria’s Secret shop assistant may have deliberately harmed herself

Man and woman released on bail after being arrested over the weekend on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm

Marie Colvin was among at least 11 people killed yesterday in the bombardment of Homs

The risks are huge, but freelance war correspondents shouldn't be shunned for having the courage to take them

Major broadsheets will no longer accept speculative submissions from Syria

Dame Helen Ghosh

Page 3 Profile: Dame Helen Ghosh, Director-General of the National Trust

More hot air in the wind turbine debate?

Tony Sheridan: Singer and guitarist who was a catalyst in the early career of The Beatles

Tony Sheridan: Singer and guitarist who was a catalyst in the early career of The Beatles

When he went to Hamburg he found that the wild and crazy lifestyle suited him perfectly

Vicky Pryce tells court she 'wished she could turn back clock' after Chris Huhne penalty points saga became headline news

The ex-wife of disgraced politician Chris Huhne said today that she wished she could have turned the clock back after her account of the penalty points saga became headline news.

Almost 250 claims have been settled by News International

Exclusive: Rupert Murdoch accused of targeting Labour staff in dirty tricks campaign

News International settles hacking claims with officials close to Blair government

Rupert Murdoch, News Corp chairman: The report says: “Politicians knew that the prize was personal and political support in his mass circulation newspapers. The value or effect of such support may have been exaggerated, but it has been treated as having real political value nonetheless.”

Rupert Murdoch's Twitter slap-down has big implications - and not just for News Corp editors

The Middle East is already one of the most difficult territories to cover. This well-publicised intervention won't make it any easier

Rupert Murdoch last night personally apologised for a “grotesque, offensive” cartoon in the Sunday Times by Gerald Scarfe

Was Rupert Murdoch right to apologise for Gerald Scarfe's cartoon in the Sunday Times?

The Sunday Times has received complaints of anti-Semitism after a cartoon was published appearing to depict Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu building a brick wall containing the blood and limbs of Palestinians.

Rupert Murdoch last night personally apologised for a “grotesque, offensive” cartoon in the Sunday Times by Gerald Scarfe

Murdoch apologises for 'offensive' Scarfe cartoon in Sunday Times denounced as anti-Semitic

Rupert Murdoch last night personally apologised for a “grotesque, offensive” cartoon in the Sunday Times which has provoked a wave of protest from Jewish organisations who have declared it anti-Semitic.

Frank Keating has died at the age of 75

Frank Keating: Doyen of sportswriters whose work was suffused with wit and and joy

Frank Keating, who has died at the age of 75, was a giant of sports journalism, although as a columnist and feature writer whose work habitually brought out the humanity and humour in a subject, he would have chortled self-mockingly at such a grandiose epitaph.

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Left: An illustration of the original Jim Crowe, played by TD Rice Right: A Couple dressed as Ray and Janay Rice
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By performing as African Americans or Indians, white people get to play act a kind of 'imaginary liberation', writes Michael Mark Cohen

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Hand out press photograph/film still from the movie Mad Max Fury Road (Downloaded from the Warner Bro's media site/Jasin Boland/© 2014 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.)
films'You have to try everything and it’s all a process of elimination, but ultimately you find your path'
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Imelda Staunton as Dolores Umbridge in the Harry Potter films
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New essay by JK Rowling went live on Pottermore site this morning

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Russia Today’s new UK channel began broadcasting yesterday. Discussions so far have included why Britons see Russia as ‘the bad guy’
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New UK station Russia Today gives a very bizarre view of Britain

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Top Gear presenter is no stranger to foot-in-mouth controversy

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Keira Knightley and Benedict Cumberbatch at the premiere of The Imitation Game at the BFI London Film Festival
filmsKeira Knightley tried to miss The Imitation Game premiere to watch Bake Off
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The drugs revolution starts now as MPs agree its high time for change

The drugs revolution starts now as MPs agree its high time for change

Commons debate highlights growing cross-party consensus on softening UK drugs legislation, unchanged for 43 years
The camera is turned on tabloid editors in Richard Peppiatt's 'One Rogue Reporter'

Gotcha! The camera is turned on tabloid editors

Hugh Grant says Richard Peppiatt's 'One Rogue Reporter' documentary will highlight issues raised by Leveson
Fall of the Berlin Wall: It was thanks to Mikhail Gorbachev that this symbol of division fell

Fall of the Berlin Wall

It was thanks to Gorbachev that this symbol of division fell
Halloween 2014: What makes Ouija boards, demon dolls, and evil clowns so frightening?

What makes ouija boards and demon dolls scary?

Ouija boards, demon dolls, evil children and clowns are all classic tropes of horror, and this year’s Halloween releases feature them all. What makes them so frightening, decade after decade?
A safari in modern Britain: Rose Rouse reveals how her four-year tour of Harlesden taught her as much about the UK as it did about NW10

Rose Rouse's safari in modern Britain

Rouse decided to walk and talk with as many different people as possible in her neighbourhood of Harlesden and her experiences have been published in a new book
Welcome to my world of no smell and odd tastes: How a bike accident left one woman living with unwanted food mash-ups

'My world of no smell and odd tastes'

A head injury from a bicycle accident had the surprising effect of robbing Nell Frizzell of two of her senses

Matt Parker is proud of his square roots

The "stand-up mathematician" is using comedy nights to preach maths to big audiences
Paul Scholes column: Beating Manchester City is vital part of life at Manchester United. This is first major test for Luke Shaw, Angel Di Maria and Radamel Falcao – it’s not a game to lose

Paul Scholes column

Beating City is vital part of life at United. This is first major test for Shaw, Di Maria and Falcao – it’s not a game to lose
Frank Warren: Call me an old git, but I just can't see that there's a place for women’s boxing

Frank Warren column

Call me an old git, but I just can't see that there's a place for women’s boxing
Adrian Heath interview: Former Everton striker prepares his Orlando City side for the MLS - and having Kaka in the dressing room

Adrian Heath's American dream...

Former Everton striker prepares his Orlando City side for the MLS - and having Kaka in the dressing room
Simon Hart: Manchester City will rise again but they need to change their attitude

Manchester City will rise again but they need to change their attitude

Manuel Pellegrini’s side are too good to fail and derby allows them to start again, says Simon Hart
Isis in Syria: A general reveals the lack of communication with the US - and his country's awkward relationship with their allies-by-default

A Syrian general speaks

A senior officer of Bashar al-Assad’s regime talks to Robert Fisk about his army’s brutal struggle with Isis, in a dirty war whose challenges include widespread atrocities
‘A bit of a shock...’ Cambridge economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

‘A bit of a shock...’ Economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

Guy Scott's predecessor, Michael Sata, died in a London hospital this week after a lengthy illness
Fall of the Berlin Wall: History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War

Fall of the Berlin Wall

History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War
How to turn your mobile phone into easy money

Turn your mobile phone into easy money

There are 90 million unused mobiles in the UK, which would be worth £7bn if we cashed them in, says David Crookes