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As if the police had not already inflicted enough trouble on themselves with the plebgate saga, a Chief Constable had to ‘fess up that his force did not understand the law that protects an MP’s right to speak freely.

Royal British Legion president Lieutenant General Sir John Kiszely resigns over lobbying allegations

The president of the Royal British Legion has become the first high profile casualty from allegations about former commanders offering to lobby for lucrative defence contracts on behalf of arms companies.

Owen Jones: Arms and the men from the military

Over two years ago – at the fag-end of Gordon Brown's then-collapsing administration – the unabashed greed of some of New Labour's high priests was exposed in pitiful detail. Posing as lobbyists scouting for new talent, journalists from The Sunday Times allowed former ministers to crucify themselves on camera. One was ex-cabinet minister Stephen Byers, who had made the clichéd journey from Trotskyist revolutionary to Blairite ideologue. He had claimed to have shifted government policy at the request of corporations such as Tesco; he was, in his own degrading description, "a taxi for hire".

MoD to look into lobbying by retired senior military

The Ministry of Defence last night launched an investigation into allegations that a series of former military chiefs had offered to lobby ministers and Whitehall officials for undercover reporters posing as arms manufacturers.

Usmanov rings up £4bn as mobile phone firm floats

Alisher Usmanov, Russia's richest man and an Arsenal shareholder, will add yet more to his vast wealth after his country's second largest mobile phone company is floated in London.

Rachel Beer (1858-1927), was aunt to the poet Siegfried Sassoon

The First Lady of Fleet Street, by Ellat Negeev and Yehuda Koren

The "first lady of Fleet Street" was a perfect incarnation of Empire: the great-granddaughter of a Baghdadi Jew, whose son settled in Bombay, where he made a family fortune out of trading opium, Rachel Sassoon grew up wealthy in London.

Food blogger wins coveted Michelin star in his first year

A food blogger has been awarded a Michelin star barely a year after opening his first restaurant.

Critic opens own restaurant – then wins a Michelin star

It's a perfect case of poacher turned gamekeeper. A food blogger who offered dining recommendations on his website has been awarded a coveted Michelin star barely a year after opening his first restaurant.

The positive power of the press must be recognised

As a wholesale demolition of our trade, Lord Leveson's letter takes some beating

Dominic Lawson: Camera phones changed the world

There is a Facebook site called Seeing Japanese Tourists Taking Photos of the Most Pointless Things. It has almost half a million followers. This is an ever-widening circle of voyeuristic absurdity: vast numbers of people staring at photographs taken by other people who enjoy stalking Japanese tourists fixated by the need to register their own image of something which is of no obvious interest.

The actress Sienna Miller told the Leveson Inquiry of her distress after her voicemails were hacked into

Names of up to 600 victims of phone hacking to be revealed

The new list is likely to cause fresh investor dissatisfaction with News International

Bankers should be paid less, says Barclays chairman

The new chairman of Barclays has admitted that its bankers are paid too much and that massive bonuses have undermined the bank's ethical culture.

Boris Johnson would be voters' choice to replace Cameron, poll says

Boris Johnson would be voters' choice to replace David Cameron as Conservative leader if he stood down before the next election, according to a poll released today.

Rupert Murdoch: 'I’ve never asked a Prime Minister for anything'

So who was telling the truth? Leveson's unfinished business

As the inquiry draws to a close, Martin Hickman looks back at the contradictions that remain

Rupert Murdoch titles missed a trick with lack of Bradley Wiggins coverage

Wiggomania belatedly took hold at News Corp. After minimal interest in Britain's most successful ever cyclist during the early stages of the Tour de France, Rupert Murdoch's media empire seemed slow to realise that Team Sky's Bradley Wiggins was one of them.

Murdoch 'will retain newspapers'

Rupert Murdoch's resignation from the board of his British newspapers has intensified speculation about their future.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine