News Thomas Perkins, who is thought to be worth around $8bn, made the startling comparison in a letter to The Wall Street Journal

Billionaire venture capitalist admits Kristallnacht was a "terrible word" to use but defends war on the rich remarks

NOTW boss 'who signed off Mulcaire's fees' is latest to be arrested

Public face of newspaper Stuart Kuttner, now 71, is drawn in to scandal

Bin laden's plan for 9/11 anniversary

Osama bin Laden was planning a major attack on the United States to coincide with the 10th anniversary this year of the 11 September atrocity. The planning even went as far as considering candidates for the attack, a report in The Wall Street Journal claims.

Gimme some sword – hold the sorcery

Interview: George R R Martin - The best-selling author brought grit to fantasy fiction – and he hopes the 'Game of Thrones' TV adaptation will keep it real

Rosneft may seek BP board seat, Russia's Sechin says

BP could face further controversy in the United States over its divisive alliance with Rosneft, after Russia's deputy prime minister, Igor Sechin, signalled yesterday that the state-controlled oil and gas giant may seek a seat on the British company's board.

Charlotte Harris: This affair is about more than media practices

Was Andy Coulson's resignation – as well as a failed attempt to bury bad news – the result of a lefty, media-village obsession, or does it really matter?

US reinforcements sent to hold Afghan gains

The United States plans to send 1,400 more Marines to Afghanistan to try to hold on to recent but fragile security gains, just months before a planned US drawdown, The Wall Street Journal reported yesterday.

Last Night's TV: Mad Men/BBC4<br />The North on a Plate/BBC4

Who is Don Draper?" That question – with a few supplementaries thrown in – has already sustained three fine series of Mad Men and it was the very first thing you heard in episode one of series four, as if to bring fans back to basics after the recess. The question was asked, in this instance, by a reporter for Advertising Age, prompted to do a small feature on Don and his new agency by a Glo-Coat Floor Wax commercial that has "caused a bit of a squeal". Don, though, was not in any mood to sell himself. "I'm from the Midwest," he replied. "We were taught that it's not polite to talk about ourselves." To give him his due – he has a lot on his mind right now. His new agency is up and running, but the employees of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce are having to lie about the scale of their operation, referring offhandedly to a "second floor" that doesn't actually exist. There's no guarantee that they'll get enough new accounts to keep the firm going, and some of the accounts they do have are proving tricky. With Thanksgiving looming, Sugarberry Ham has sent just one tin of the product into the office – a slight that Pete reads as a sign of imminent defection to another agency – and Don is struggling with the Jantzen account, a self-styled "family-firm", which is attempting to hold back the advancing tide of bikini miniaturisation.

Business Diary: Philippines' gain proves illusory

Stock market investors in the Philippines thought they had earned a buck or two yesterday, as their benchmark index soared by 14 per cent during the first three hours of trading. Sadly for them, the Philippine Stock Exchange then decided to suspend trading as it published a statement conceding that he gains were erroneously produced by a brand new computer system launched yesterday morning. In fact, share prices had fallen by 0.1 per cent over the three hours in question. Let's hope no one spent their winnings.

Rupert Murdoch: We're going to stop Google taking our stories for nothing

Why did I decide we would charge online? Because I listened to [my] executives, the case they made, and the revenue involved and the success of it.

John Rentoul: Gordon Brown, late again

Point two on Peter Watt's book, Inside Out, was made by Iain Martin, now a must-read blogger at The Wall Street Journal.

Knives come out for Obama's 'preening' social secretary

The President is under pressure to sack Desiree Rogers, after she was blamed for letting in White House gatecrashers

Business Diary: US expats cry foul over 'Wall Street Journal'

Much huffing and puffing amongst US expats about a coup pulled off by Patience Wheatcroft, the new editor-in-chief of the Wall Street Journal in Europe. Once Ms Wheatcroft has finished a revamp of the European edition of the paper, its owner, Dow Jones, plans to stop selling the US edition on this side of the Atlantic. Its small, but loyal, band of readers is not happy.

Thain accuses BofA of lying during bonus row

John Thain, the former chief executive of Merrill Lynch, has made a dramatic last-minute intervention in the shareholder revolt at its parent company, Bank of America, suggesting that the company had lied about his role in the controversial payment of $3.6bn (£2.5bn) in bonuses to staff.

Facebook plans to give developers more access

Internet social media company Facebook plans to allow outside developers access to core parts of the website so they can build new services, a person familiar with the situation said.

Andrew Keen: Hats off to Mr Murdoch

Much cynicism greeted the Wall Street Journal's decision last month to begin a sports section. But the cynics were wrong.

Voices
Mosul dam was retaken with the help of the US
voicesRobert Fisk: Barack Obama is following the jihadists’ script
Arts and Entertainment
Loaded weapon: drugs have surprise side effects for Scarlett Johansson in Luc Besson’s ‘Lucy’
filmReview: Lucy, Luc Besson's complex thriller
News
A cleaner prepares the red carpet for the opening night during the 59th International Cannes Film Festival May 17, 2006 in Cannes, France.
newsPowerful vacuum cleaners to be banned under EU regulations
News
people
News
A polar bear’s diet is rich in seal blubber and half of its own body weight is composed of fat
i100
News
London is the most expensive city in Europe for cultural activities such as ballet
arts
Travel
Flocking round: Beyoncé, Madame Tussauds' latest waxwork, looking fierce in the park
travelIn a digital age when we have more access than ever to the stars, why are waxworks still pulling in crowds?
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape