News Thomas Perkins, who is thought to be worth around $8bn, made the startling comparison in a letter to The Wall Street Journal

Billionaire venture capitalist admits Kristallnacht was a "terrible word" to use but defends war on the rich remarks

NOTW boss 'who signed off Mulcaire's fees' is latest to be arrested

Public face of newspaper Stuart Kuttner, now 71, is drawn in to scandal

Bin laden's plan for 9/11 anniversary

Osama bin Laden was planning a major attack on the United States to coincide with the 10th anniversary this year of the 11 September atrocity. The planning even went as far as considering candidates for the attack, a report in The Wall Street Journal claims.

Gimme some sword – hold the sorcery

Interview: George R R Martin - The best-selling author brought grit to fantasy fiction – and he hopes the 'Game of Thrones' TV adaptation will keep it real

Rosneft may seek BP board seat, Russia's Sechin says

BP could face further controversy in the United States over its divisive alliance with Rosneft, after Russia's deputy prime minister, Igor Sechin, signalled yesterday that the state-controlled oil and gas giant may seek a seat on the British company's board.

Charlotte Harris: This affair is about more than media practices

Was Andy Coulson's resignation – as well as a failed attempt to bury bad news – the result of a lefty, media-village obsession, or does it really matter?

US reinforcements sent to hold Afghan gains

The United States plans to send 1,400 more Marines to Afghanistan to try to hold on to recent but fragile security gains, just months before a planned US drawdown, The Wall Street Journal reported yesterday.

Last Night's TV: Mad Men/BBC4<br />The North on a Plate/BBC4

Who is Don Draper?" That question – with a few supplementaries thrown in – has already sustained three fine series of Mad Men and it was the very first thing you heard in episode one of series four, as if to bring fans back to basics after the recess. The question was asked, in this instance, by a reporter for Advertising Age, prompted to do a small feature on Don and his new agency by a Glo-Coat Floor Wax commercial that has "caused a bit of a squeal". Don, though, was not in any mood to sell himself. "I'm from the Midwest," he replied. "We were taught that it's not polite to talk about ourselves." To give him his due – he has a lot on his mind right now. His new agency is up and running, but the employees of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce are having to lie about the scale of their operation, referring offhandedly to a "second floor" that doesn't actually exist. There's no guarantee that they'll get enough new accounts to keep the firm going, and some of the accounts they do have are proving tricky. With Thanksgiving looming, Sugarberry Ham has sent just one tin of the product into the office – a slight that Pete reads as a sign of imminent defection to another agency – and Don is struggling with the Jantzen account, a self-styled "family-firm", which is attempting to hold back the advancing tide of bikini miniaturisation.

Business Diary: Philippines' gain proves illusory

Stock market investors in the Philippines thought they had earned a buck or two yesterday, as their benchmark index soared by 14 per cent during the first three hours of trading. Sadly for them, the Philippine Stock Exchange then decided to suspend trading as it published a statement conceding that he gains were erroneously produced by a brand new computer system launched yesterday morning. In fact, share prices had fallen by 0.1 per cent over the three hours in question. Let's hope no one spent their winnings.

Rupert Murdoch: We're going to stop Google taking our stories for nothing

Why did I decide we would charge online? Because I listened to [my] executives, the case they made, and the revenue involved and the success of it.

John Rentoul: Gordon Brown, late again

Point two on Peter Watt's book, Inside Out, was made by Iain Martin, now a must-read blogger at The Wall Street Journal.

Knives come out for Obama's 'preening' social secretary

The President is under pressure to sack Desiree Rogers, after she was blamed for letting in White House gatecrashers

Business Diary: US expats cry foul over 'Wall Street Journal'

Much huffing and puffing amongst US expats about a coup pulled off by Patience Wheatcroft, the new editor-in-chief of the Wall Street Journal in Europe. Once Ms Wheatcroft has finished a revamp of the European edition of the paper, its owner, Dow Jones, plans to stop selling the US edition on this side of the Atlantic. Its small, but loyal, band of readers is not happy.

Thain accuses BofA of lying during bonus row

John Thain, the former chief executive of Merrill Lynch, has made a dramatic last-minute intervention in the shareholder revolt at its parent company, Bank of America, suggesting that the company had lied about his role in the controversial payment of $3.6bn (£2.5bn) in bonuses to staff.

Facebook plans to give developers more access

Internet social media company Facebook plans to allow outside developers access to core parts of the website so they can build new services, a person familiar with the situation said.

Andrew Keen: Hats off to Mr Murdoch

Much cynicism greeted the Wall Street Journal's decision last month to begin a sports section. But the cynics were wrong.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine