News Daltrey: 'We should all start to be a bit more aware of our mortality'

The frontman has called for a halt to medical advances which could extend mortality well beyond the age of 100

The Last Holiday: A Memoir, By Gil Scott-Heron

The better half of a poet's life

Album: The Maccabees, Given to the Wild (Fiction)

It's hard not to feel somewhat let down by The Maccabees' follow-up to 2009's Wall of Arms.

The best of pluck: less is more for Laura Marling

Why pop stars should end on a high note

Laura Marling has dropped the obligatory encore. Other acts should too, says Elisa Bray

Roger Daltrey in the 1975 rock opera 'Lisztomania'. Ken Russell had the courage to create great art

Jessica Duchen: Russell was always at top of my Liszt

The week in culture

Pete Townshend fears innovation will be lost unless digital music providers work like record labels

Pete Townshend says iTunes is 'a digital vampire'

With his trademark windmilling strumming arm, penchant for smashing up expensive guitars live on stage and pioneering love of rock opera, Pete Townshend has had little regard for the conventions of the music industry during his 50-year career.

Terence Blacker: Come off it Paxo, you can't blame the baby-boomers

The Way We Live: The idea that billions of people were uniquely selfish is idiotic

Letter from the i editor: An odd choice

It was such an innocent letter that poor Jackie Keene had the temerity to write (5 September). Jackie dared to question the Olympic organisers’ choice of aged rockers The Who to headline next year’s closing ceremony.

A Book of Liszts, By John Spurling

With the Faustian frenzy of the first "Mephisto Waltz" and the macabre extravaganza of the Totentanz, tonight the BBC Proms winds up its celebration of the music of Franz Liszt. Born 200 years ago, the son of a farm manager on the Esterhazy estates in Hungary, the piano virtuoso and revolutionary composer debuted aged nine. At 11, he played for Beethoven, who kissed the boy's forehead and blessed him as "one of the fortunate ones" who bring "joy".

My Fantasy Band: Sea of Bees

Album: The Pirates, Shakin' with the Devil (Salvo/Fly)

Without The Pirates we wouldn't have had Dr Feelgood, let alone Johnny Kidd. Maybe not The Who. The Pirates permitted all manner of things to occur. And for a brief period in the late 1970s, they staged a comeback, sounding like the Feelgoods sans Brilleaux, sans psychosis, sans a little swing. Here are their finest moments, many of them live, all of them demonstrating why Mick Green plus Fender Tele Custom should be taken as the sound of British electric guitar. Rockin'.

Brighton pier put up for sale

One of Britain's most famous seaside attractions, Brighton Pier, has been put up for sale, its owner has disclosed.

John Lennon album sells for 23k

An album signed by John Lennon hours before he was shot dead has fetched £23,750 at auction.

Leading article: Bringing the music revolution home

The news that British artists have suffered their worst showing in the six-decade history of the UK singles chart will come as no surprise to students of post-war history. The Americans invented popular music, both as an industry and as a cultural phenomenon, but by the 1960s it had become an Anglo-American enterprise, with the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and The Who among the most popular bands on the planet.

George Davis may well be innocent, court rules

George Davis is as innocent as he will ever be. A brief court hearing yesterday ended the 27 year saga of the notorious miscarriage of justice that spawned the most famous slogan ever to have come out of the London gangland.

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Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: ‘We give them hope. They come to us when no one else can help’

Christmas Appeal

Meet the charity giving homeless veterans hope – and who they turn to when no one else can help
Should doctors and patients learn to plan humane, happier endings rather than trying to prolong life?

Is it always right to try to prolong life?

Most of us would prefer to die in our own beds, with our families beside us. But, as a GP, Margaret McCartney sees too many end their days in a medicalised battle
Thomas Cook's outgoing boss Harriet Green got by on four hours sleep a night - is that what it takes for women to get to the top?

What does it take for women to get to the top?

Thomas Cook's outgoing boss Harriet Green got by on four hours sleep a night and told women they had to do more if they wanted to get on
Radio 4 to broadcast 10-hour War and Peace on New Year's Day as Controller warns of cuts

Just what you need on a New Year hangover...

Radio 4 to broadcast 10-hour adaptation of War and Peace on first day of 2015
Christmas 2014: 10 best educational toys

Learn and play: 10 best educational toys

Of course you want them to have fun, but even better if they can learn at the same time
Cameron, Miliband and Clegg join forces for Homeless Veterans campaign

Cameron, Miliband and Clegg join forces for Homeless Veterans campaign

It's in all our interests to look after servicemen and women who fall on hard times, say party leaders
Millionaire Sol Campbell wades into wealthy backlash against Labour's mansion tax

Sol Campbell cries foul at Labour's mansion tax

The former England defender joins Myleene Klass, Griff Rhys Jones and Melvyn Bragg in criticising proposals
Nicolas Sarkozy returns: The ex-President is preparing to fight for the leadership of France's main opposition party – but will he win big enough?

Sarkozy returns

The ex-President is preparing to fight for the leadership of France's main opposition party – but will he win big enough?
Is the criticism of Ed Miliband a coded form of anti-Semitism?

Is the criticism of Miliband anti-Semitic?

Attacks on the Labour leader have coalesced around a sense that he is different, weird, a man apart. But is the criticism more sinister?
Ouija boards are the must-have gift this Christmas, fuelled by a schlock horror film

Ouija boards are the must-have festive gift

Simon Usborne explores the appeal - and mysteries - of a century-old parlour game
There's a Good Girl exhibition: How female creatives are changing the way women are portrayed in advertising

In pictures: There's a Good Girl exhibition

The new exhibition reveals how female creatives are changing the way women are portrayed in advertising
UK firm Biscuiteers is giving cookies a makeover - from advent calendars to doll's houses

UK firm Biscuiteers is giving cookies a makeover

It worked with cupcakes, doughnuts and macarons so no wonder someone decided to revamp the humble biscuit
Can SkySaga capture the Minecraft magic?

Can SkySaga capture the Minecraft magic?

It's no surprise that the building game born in Sweden in 2009 and now played by millions, has imitators keen to construct their own mega money-spinner
The King's School is way ahead of the pack when it comes to using the latest classroom technology

Staying connected: The King's School

The school in Cambridgeshire is ahead of the pack when it comes to using the latest classroom technology. Richard Garner discovers how teachers and pupils stay connected
Christmas 2014: 23 best women's perfumes

Festively fragrant: the best women's perfumes

Give a loved one a luxe fragrance this year or treat yourself to a sensual pick-me-up