Voices A US Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan

Watch out, within five years 7,500 drones may be plying American airspace

Oprah Winfrey said she was victimised at the Trois Pommes boutique in Zurich. The store's owner Trudie Goetz has apologised

So, what was it about Oprah Winfrey – black billionaire – that made Zurich store assume that she couldn’t afford a handbag?

Swiss boutique apologises after being accused of racism by the world’s most celebrated talk show host

Mort-ish: (from left) Anne Consigny as Claire Séguret, Yara Pilartz as Camille Séguret, Frédéric Pierrot as Jérôme Séguret, Jenna Thiam as Léna Séguret in ‘The Returned’

Grace Dent on TV: The Returned, Channel 4

It's the undead with subtitles. Only they don't explain why zombies like pasta so much

The winning team from University of Birmingham l-r: Jonathan Jones, Richard Tasker, Harry Proud and Harry Thorpe

The iQuiz final: '50% More Moustache' victorious by a whisker

On Tuesday night, 18 crack teams of students convened at Birmingham's Ikon Gallery for the inaugural iQuiz. Each team had battled through regional heats in November, lured by an unforgettable prize: a two-week trek across America.

FSA chief calls for central banks to finance government deficits

Central banks should be prepared to break the ultimate monetary taboo and directly finance government's deficits, the chairman of the Financial Services Authority, Lord Turner, suggested in a speech last night.

Page 3 Profile: Tina Turner, soon-to-be Swiss singer

What's her love of Switzerland got to do, got to do with it?

In an effort to keep birds away from their runway, airport bosses have taken to blasting out Turner's hits at high-volume from a van that drives around the grounds.

Not so silent wings: Tina Turner songs used to scare birds off the runway at Staverton airport

With over 50 years in the music business Anna Mae Bullock, or Tina Turner as she's known to most of us, has accolades, awards and hits aplenty; and now airport chiefs at Staverton, near Gloucester have handed her another.

Nicholas Dwyer and Christina Gill in <i>Carmen</i>

Carmen, King's Head, Islington, London
Peter and the Wolf, Royal Festival Hall, London

OperaUpClose veer towards greatest-hits territory while a lupine concert holds toddlers transfixed

'I never wanted to be famous': Craig Logan on the Bros years

He quit Bros at 19 &ndash; and transformed himself into a music-industry mogul. Ian Burrell meets Craig Logan, reformed teen idol.

Watched by millions, the final act of a courtroom tragedy

Televising the trial of a young mother accused of child murder threatens to tip the scales of justice. Guy Adams reports

I Was Douglas Adams's Flatmate, By Andrew McGibbon

Andrew McGibbon currently makes a living as a writer and producer of broadcast comedy. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, however, he played drums in Morrissey's backing band. This brush with celebrity became the basis of a radio programme, which grew into a Radio 4 series – and which has now resulted in this odd collection of interviews with people who were once on first-name terms with the famous. "One person's unique encounter with a legend, by way of factotemry [or] flatmatery," McGibbon explains, creates "an unusual and very personal insight into the famous one, highlighting the ordinary... things about them or their behaviour that demythologise them." The dozen legends are almost all from a different era of fame, when celebrities were known for something other than celebrity itself. But besides that distinction, they're a bafflingly eclectic bunch.

Lucky Peterson, Ronnie Scott's, London

Lucky Peterson sits unnoticed at the bar, fedora pulled low and dark coat draped on his shoulders. He must have gotten his name when, aged five, the legendary bluesman Willie Dixon saw him performing at his father's upstate New York roadhouse and produced his first record. He was already a stage veteran of two years. The skinny adult blues prodigy of the 1980s is a big man now, and vanished for a while with bad luck. Still only 45, he has older times in him. He devours Ronnie Scott's tonight.

Dick Griffey: Record producer and executive who spoke out against the exploitation of black musicians

With infectious, irresistible invitations to the dance-floor such as "And The Beat Goes On" by the Whispers, "A Night To Remember" by Shalamar and "Midas Touch" by Midnight Star, Sound of Los Angeles Records – commonly abbreviated to Solar – the West Coast label founded by Dick Griffey, provided the sunny, soulful soundtrack for much of the Eighties on both sides of the Atlantic.

Heaven 17, Corn Exchange, Brighton

Heaven 17 celebrate three decades of their debut album, which hasn't lost its relevance

Tony Blair's sister-in-law converts to Islam

Tony Blair's sister-in-law, Lauren Booth, has become the latest in a long line of Western Islamic converts. From Chris Eubank to Jermaine Jackson to Alexander Litvinenko, she joins an eclectic list, yet she is markedly different from most of its names, for one key reason – she is female.

Misplaced affection: The art of losing isn't hard to master

We carry more stuff with us than ever, and lost property offices are full of items that we leave behind. Is this accidental or is it a subconscious attempt to free ourselves from a life of clutter? By Michael Bywater
Arts and Entertainment
Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
art
News
Kenny Ireland, pictured in 2010.
peopleActor, from House of Cards and Benidorm, was 68
News
A scene from the video shows students mock rioting
newsEnd-of-year leaver's YouTube film features staging of a playground gun massacre
Travel
travel
Voices
A family sit and enjoy a quiet train journey
voicesForcing us to overhear dull phone conversations is an offensive act, says Simon Kelner
News
i100This Instagram photo does not prove Russian army is in Ukraine
News
Morrissey pictured in 2013
people
Sport
sportVan Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Environment
View from the Llanberis Track to the mountain lake Llyn
Du’r Arddu
environmentA large chunk of Mount Snowdon, in north Wales, is up for sale
Life and Style
Martha Stewart wrote an opinion column for Time magazine this week titled “Why I Love My Drone”
lifeLifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot... to take photos of her farm
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices