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Vernon Kay

Meet America's divorce king

As one of America's top divorce lawyers, Gerald Nissenbaum says he sees people at their very worst. Yet he has kept a sense of humour, and says parting really can be sweet sorrow. Nick Duerden reports

Hit & Run: Sexiest thing in the office

Are you sitting comfortably? I am, which is a first for a lanky loafer with a dodgy back, fidgety disposition and a posture more brute than ballerina. For a week I have been carpet-testing an office chair hailed by its makers as a revolution in workplace seating. Not very exciting, as revolutions go, but office furniture rarely is. Yet millions of us spend more time on our swivels than anywhere else bar our beds (if we're lucky).

Hit & Run: Roses are red, texts are blue

According to a survey conducted by the Ministry of Not Terribly Surprising Information, 78 per cent of women would love to receive a love letter, but only 50 per cent of men have ever sent one. The survey doesn't record how many men would love to receive a love letter; perhaps the conveners of the survey imagine most men would respond to such a missive with suspicion or puzzlement or hostility.

The Big Question: Why has Wikipedia changed editorial policy, and will

Wikipedia, the online encyclopaedia launched by American entrepreneur Jimmy Wales in 2001 with the idealistic intention of being an online repository of all human knowledge, announced this week that it would have to abandon one of its founding principles. To combat a growing amount of vandalism on the website, a two-month trial is being initiated whereby entries will be edited before they go up on the site. Previously, any user was allowed to make – almost – any change to any entry: this was hailed as part of the democratising power of the internet. But a sharp increase in false information – particularly in relation to people still alive – has forced a rethink.

Poulter twitters among the birdies

Ian Poulter was at Wimbledon yesterday, watching Andy Murray while tapping furiously into his mobile phone. But these were not the ignorant actions of a bored corporate guest, a self-obsessed sportsman even, staying in touch with his wonderful life via text. Here was a diligent twitterer keeping his 130,000 followers up to date with events on Centre Court.