Arts and Entertainment The V&A says it has discovered a previously unknown oil sketch by John Constable tucked beneath the lining of another work

Restorers uncovered the artwork while renovating a major painting

X Factor stars Tulisa Contostavlos and Nicole Scherzinger win Cosmopolitan Ultimate Women of the Year Awards and One Direction are named the Ultimate Men of the Year

X Factor rivals Tulisa Contostavlos and Nicole Scherzinger both had cause for celebration after landing gongs at the Cosmopolitan Ultimate Women of the Year Awards.

Broadcast exhibitions online to receive funding, Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt tells art world

Arts bodies will have to broadcast performances and exhibitions live on a new digital arts “channel” in return for receiving government money, under a radical funding shake-up proposed by Jeremy Hunt.

Inside the artist’s studio: Anne Hardy

British artist Anne Hardy photographs large-scale interior spaces which she carefully constructs over several months. Using complex camera techniques, reflections and painstaking positioning of objects, she conjures still life images that look as if a person has just stepped out of them and paint vivid portraits of that imaginary occupant.

Young at art? Not any more, say galleries as school visits drop

Britain's leading galleries are losing hundreds of thousands of child visitors every year, raising concerns about the artistic education of the nation's children.

Where have all the children gone, Britain's galleries wonder

The decline is exacerbated by the fact that four out of 10 secondary schools have cut key artistic subjects

Heads Up: Postmodernism

Why subverting style is more than just a knowing wink

Object lesson: How the world of decorative art is being revolutionised by 3D printing

The age of three-dimensional printing is upon us: furniture, clothing, whatever you can imagine... Holly Williams watches a table being 'born' and gets her head round a new industrial revolution

Darwin the Writer, By George Levine

To come up trumps on the evolutionary scale is a doddle compared with publishing a book - let alone one that does not slumber in the warehouse. Triumphantly, George Levine's latest Darwinian study shows why both men should be read, and enjoyed - by those who deny evolution, and those who take it for granted. Rarely is textual analysis so exhilarating.

The Secret History Of: Jacobsen Series 7 chair

There's no mistaking the voluptuous hourglass form of Arne Jacobsen's 1955 Model 3107 chair, better known as the Series 7. So the Danish designer must have seen it as a fitting tribute when the Swinging Sixties' most infamous set of curves straddled his creation for a nude photo shoot, sending sales through the roof, where they remain to this day.

Islam-inspired Jameel award announces finalists

Ten artists, chosen from over 100 nominations, will be exhibiting their work at London's Victoria and Albert Museum this month.

Horniman Museum gives a glimpse of music's past

Side by side sit two instruments once owned by Italian horn player Giovanni Puzzi. In the bell of one, lavish decoration in green lacquer has worn away exactly at the spots on which Puzzi placed his hand to shape the pitch of his notes. The musician's grandson gave it to the V&A in 1926.

Portraits of South Africa

David Goldblatt is among the photographers whose work on South Africa goes on show at the V&A tomorrow

The Cult of Beauty: the Aesthetic Movement 1860-1900, V&A Museum, London

What should make the curve of a brow, or the cherry flush of a lip, beautiful? Why are peacocks' feathers, rich in delicate texture and iridescent colour so unlikely, so pointlessly extravagant? What can we learn from contemplating such things? The Cult of Beauty at the V&A explores "the Aesthetic Movement" in Britain, an umbrella term for groups of individuals working across the various artforms at the end part of the 19th century, who believed in beauty for its own sake. As an exhibition it manages a critical recouping of rather unfashionable Victorian art, and also makes an intellectual, historical case for corralling together such figures as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, James McNeill Whistler, Oscar Wilde, Aubrey Beardsley and William Morris.

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