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Dance review: Touch Wood, The Place, London

The Place’s Touch Wood programme invites audiences to give feedback on works in progress. Audience members still weren’t expecting to find themselves on stage for Aoi Nakamura and Esteban Fourmi’s KINBAKU, edging away nervously whenever Nakamura lurched towards them, swinging a bundle of ropes. By the end, they were drawn into the piece, moving confidently along the lines of rope.

Classical review: Prom 18, Wagner, Siegfried, Daniel Barenboim, Berlin

The Proms’ Ring has reached episode three: Siegfried, the one where a fearless beefcake falls in love with his aunt. After the incestuous passions of Die Walküre it doesn’t seem so risqué. Its five-hour span moves from darkest foreboding to love music intense almost to the point of insanity, which Justin Way’s semi-staging matched by flooding the whole auditorium with pinky-gold light.

Theatre review: Harlequin Goes to the Moon - The Harlequin moonshot is

A country churchyard lush with meadow flowers, a coop of happy hens nearby …. The seductive location is typical of where The Rude Mechanical Theatre Company nightly strikes its stage. Each summer, they tow their two-storey wagon to commons and stubble fields across England’s southern counties. In style, though, they are travelling players of 16th-century Italy. It’s just a pity they can’t have Italian weather. 

Music review: Burt Bacharach, Royal Festival Hall, London

Burt Bacharach strolls onto the Festival Hall stage like he's stepping on board a yacht, the brass buttons on his blazer gleaming in the spotlight. A brief pause to acknowledge the applause, then the captain takes the helm of his Steinway to steer his crew smoothly through a half-century of hits.

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Album review: Dobrinka Tabakova, String Paths (ECM New Series)

Aptly for a Bulgarian composer educated in England, the music of Dobrinka Tabakova pivots on the cusp of East and West European, as well as sounding both ancient and modern. As with many modern composers, there are echoes here of Arvo Pärt, both in the tintinnabuli effects occasionally discernible in the turbulent first movement of her “Concerto for Cello and Strings”, and in the ascetic but radiant tone of her string trio “Insight”.