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One of that select band of British pianists to achieve international recognition, Bernard Roberts was in constant demand as a recitalist, chamber musician, accompanist, concerto soloist and teacher. He was acclaimed by audiences and critics, the remarkable breadth of his industry bringing greater recognition for the instrument itself and proving pivotal in inspiring generations of aspiring performers.

A Stradivarius violin at the restoration and research laboratory of the Musee de la Musique in Paris

Stradivarius violin worth millions stolen from musician during armed robbery

The rare violin is known as the Lipinski and was on loan to the lead violinist Frank Almond

Still with us: the peculiar embarrassment of the premature obituary

Sometimes, the media reports the death of a public figure – or even a private one – when he or she is very much alive. Obits editor Chris Maume explains how it happens

Gwilym Simcock, gig review: 'All hugely accomplished'

Kings Place, London

Ian Lake was finally convicted of sexual offences in 1995, after years of abusing students

Decades of abuse by Royal College of Music piano teacher Ian Lake boosts demands for inquiry

Victims demand to know why Ian Lake was employed by Royal College of Music for so long

The King’s Consort, Wigmore Hall, London: classical review

To hear Robert King and his Consort presenting Bach’s Christmas music directly after hearing Stephen Layton and the OAE do the same is to realise what a wealth of approaches are now on offer. King’s forces were much smaller, but they more than made up for it through the gutsiness of their vocal sound and the exoticism of their instrumentation.

Rare 1696 Stradivarius violin worth £1.2m has finally been found by police

Violin which thief tried to sell for £100 sold for £1.4m

When John Maughan stole a violin from a sandwich shop outside London's Euston station in 2010, he apparently didn't realise quite how valuable it was.

Mitsuko Uchida, Berlin Phil musicians, classical review

Wigmore Hall, London

A 'scissors' dancer grabs her shoe with her mouth while performing in a national scissors dance competition in the outskirts of Lima, Peru

In pictures: 'Scissors' Dance Competition in Peru

Peru is celebrating this week after UNESCO announced that the scissors dance, a traditional competitive dance from Quechua villages in Peru’s south-central highlands and Huaconada met the criteria for worldwide notice.The Danza de las Tijeras, or scissors dance involves dancers who hold in their right hand iron rods, which represents scissors blades.

The News Matrix: Thursday 3 October 2013

Honours for Dark Knight composer

Australian saxophonist Amy Dickson has hit the top of the UK Classical charts

Saxophone bursts into the Classic Brits with breakthrough win for Amy Dickson

Amy Dickson, the Australian musician who elevated the saxophone from the nightclub to the concert hall, has been named Breakthrough Artist of the Year at the Classic Brits, marking the first victory for the instrument.

Nicola Benedetti has criticised the state of music teaching in Britain

Nicola Benedetti: Every young person in Britain should be made to study classical music

Acclaimed violinist criticises music teaching in the UK

Alison Balsom, trumpet player

Page 3 Profile: Alison Balsom, trumpet player

What’s the fanfare all about?

Alison Balsom has been named artist of the year at the Gramophone Classical Music Awards

Trumpeter Alison Balsom named first female artist of the year at Gramophone Classical Music Awards

Classical trumpeter Alison Balsom has been named artist of the year at this year's Gramophone Classical Music Awards - becoming the first British woman to win the prize.

Classical review: quartet-lab, Wigmore Hall, London

Signifying their subversive intent with a lower-case title, quartet-lab aim to revolutionise the quartet repertoire. They are led by the charismatic Pekka Kuusisto, whose credentials as a jazz and folk violinist are as impressive as those for his classical work. Maverick Dutch cellist Pieter Wispelwey has long pioneered unusual arrangements, and with Kuusisto’s Finnish compatriot Lilli Maijala as violist, and with the Moldovan violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja - who inherited a wider musical perspective from her cimbalom-playing father – these are all seasoned innovators.

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