Arts and Entertainment

The Bloomsbury Set: literary and potato peel pie society

Ethan Hawke, left, and Julie Delpy, in a scene from the film,

Berlin Film Festival review: Before Midnight starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy

This navel gazing film from Richard Linklater is witty and well written but tries too hard to give the illusion of spontaneity

IoS paperback review: To the River, By Olivia Laing

To the River belongs to that happily renascent tradition of literary nature writing.

The Saturday Quiz answers

1. Quebec.

Umbrella, By Will Self

Moving through time from modern madness to the Great War

Haddon says: 'Being regarded as a hero by society is an unhealthy situation to be in'

One Minute With: Mark Haddon, novelist

Where are you now and what can you see?

Invisible Ink: No 120, Elizabeth Jenkins

To modern readers, many 1930s writers might as well be using Shakespearian English, such is the grace and complexity of their language. Is this why Elizabeth Jenkins has disappeared from bookshops?

The Heresy of Love, Swan Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

Eight years ago, in their excellent Spanish Golden Age season, the RSC presented the English premiere of House of Desires, a surprising event on several levels.

Orlando, St George's West, Edinburgh

Adapting Virginia Woolf's fantastical novel, which follows the title character through four centuries and a sex change, is no mean feat.

Edith Wharton: Sex, Satire and the Older Woman, By Avril Horner and Janet Beer

Wharton's late works hit the motherload

Essays, Volume 6: 1933-1941, By Virginia Woolf

Most writers are poor. Virginia Woolf, high priestess of modernism, had to earn her living like anybody else. These days, her kind of fiction, richly figurative, with her characters' narratives floating dreamily between inner and outer life, is not fashionable. During her lifetime, and until only recently, Woolf was hailed as a genius. Despite her success, however, she still had to make sure she could pay the bills. Her expenses, unlike ours perhaps, included paying for live-in domestic help (a difficult situation for both mistress and maid, brilliantly analysed by Alison Light in Mrs Woolf and the Servants).

A Delicate Balance, Almeida Theatre, London

Edward Albee's 1966 country house comedy is a still startling mix of bizarre story-telling, sozzled sarcasm, unnamed terror and ruminations on friendship and alcohol.

The Blitz: The British Under Attack, By Juliet Gardiner

London's burning: the view from Ground Zero

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Crucible Theatre, Sheffield

Lovers of TV's Mad Men will feel very much at home amid the styling and fashions of this excellent Northern Stage and Sheffield Theatres co-production of Edward Albee's early 1960s American-dream-about-to-turn-sour classic.

Literary haunts: Virginia's London walks

Virginia Woolf walked London's parks for inspiration, and to find solace from her dark moods. Seventy years after her great-aunt's death, Emma Woolf argues that you can still find her restless spirit there

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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

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The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
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Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
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Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
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Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
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Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

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From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
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Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

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Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
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We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

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Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

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The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

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