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Protesters topple Lenin statue in Kiev

Goodbye, Lenin: Protesters raise the stakes at Kiev rally as they topple statue of former Communist leader

As hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians demonstrate against plans for closer ties with Moscow, a hated symbol of Soviet rule is removed

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny takes photos on his smartphone during his court appearance in Kirov

Putin in surprise support for Cyprus bailout as Russians shop around for other options

Russia has put aside its anger over what it sees as an unfair levy on major deposits held in Cypriot banks, and agreed to support Europe’s bailout of the island by refinancing a major loan to the country. The usually hawkish President Vladimir Putin had no sharp rhetoric for the EU or Cyprus today, but instead confirmed that Russia would backstop the EU bailout by restructuring a €2.5bn loan first extended two years ago.

England fan attacked before start of Euro 2012 match

As England's opening game of Euro 2012 got under way, the travelling army of Three Lions fans were in strong voice in and around the stadium.

Kim Jong-il lying in state; his body is likely to displayed with that of his father

Preserved forever: Kim Jong-il will get the Lenin treatment

Dear Leader's body will be embalmed and put on display in tradition of communist rulers

North Korean leader tells Russia he is ready to halt nuclear tests

Pyongyang is ready to suspend its nuclear missile tests if international talks on its atomic programme resume, a spokesman for Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said after his rare meeting yesterday with North Korea's reclusive leader, Kim Jong il.

Putin kicks off campaign to lionise a ruthless predecessor

Vladimir Putin has launched a programme to lionise Pyotr Stolypin, a Tsarist-era Russian prime minister who was known for his ruthless methods. Monuments will be built to the statesman to celebrate the 150th anniversary of his birth and streets and even a university will be renamed after him.

Communist fury as Tajik Lenin statue finally toppled

Workers began pulling down the largest statue of Vladimir Lenin in ex-Soviet Central Asia yesterday, sparking outrage from die-hard Communists celebrating the Russian revolutionary's 141st birthday.

A Day That Shook The World: Tsar Nikolas abdicates

On 15 March 1917, the supreme ruler of Russia, the autocratic Tsar Nikolas II, was forced to abdicate in the face of revolution.

British warships sunk 90 years ago found

The wrecks of three British warships that were intended to forestall a Soviet and German takeover of the Baltic states after 1917's October revolution have been found off the coast of Estonia.

Kraken: An Anatomy by China Miéville

There is no place in literary fantasy as strange as the multiple layers and many cultures of a modern city, seen asquint. This is why, from Moorcock to Gaiman and Mieville, some of the best British fantasy has not dealt with the great Matter of Arthurian Britain, but the Matter of London. Such novels not concerned with heroic quests for the cure for the world's pain so much as the equally huge problem of making a place for human life amid blood, money and filth. China Miéville's first novel, and his first book for young adults, were both stabs at this subject - all his books are, if you see New Crobuzon in the three "Bas-Lag" novels, and the divided Beszel/Ul Qoma of The City and the City as versions of London, just as much as the Invisible Cities of Italo Calvino are all Venice.

Why This World, By Benjamin Moser

When, in 1990, Near to the Wild Heart was brought to us in a powerful English translation by Giovanni Pontiero, the novel was promoted as by an unknown who was also "one of the major Portuguese-language writers this century". Yet it was already 46 years since its appearance in Brazil, a near half-century in which Clarice Lispector had published five novels and five short-story collections, along with her "bread-and-butter": an impressive quantity of women's columns and literary cronicas, alternating popular and intellectual outlets.

New statue to honour memory of Brezhnev

Thirteen years after the collapse of Communism and the systematic toppling of its idols, the Russian city of Novorossiysk is to turn back the clock and erect a monument to the dour Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?
Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

'Heritage' is a loaded word in the Dixie, but the Charleston killings show how dangerous it is to cling to a deadly past, says Rupert Cornwell
What exactly does 'one' mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

What exactly does 'one' mean?

Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue
E L James's book Grey is a reminder of how the phenomenon of the best-seller works

Grey is a reminder of how the phenomenon of the best-seller works

It's hard to understand why so many are buying it – but then best-selling was ever an inexact science, says DJ Taylor
Behind the scenes of the world's most experimental science labs

World's most experimental science labs

The photographer Daniel Stier has spent four years gaining access to some of the world's most curious scientific experiments
It's the stroke of champions - so why is the single-handed backhand on the way out?

Single-handed backhand: on the way out?

If today's young guns wish to elevate themselves to the heights of Sampras, Graf and Federer, it's time to fire up the most thrilling shot in tennis
HMS Saracen: Meeting the last survivor of a submarine found 72 years after it was scuttled

HMS Saracen

Meeting the last survivor of a submarine found 72 years after it was scuttled
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Martine Wright lost both legs in the attack – she explains how her experience since shows 'anything is possible'

7/7 bombings 10 years on

Martine Wright lost both legs in the attack – she explains how her experience since shows 'anything is possible'