Susan Boyle, here performing 'I Dreamed A Dream', has revealed she has been diagnosed with Asperger syndrome

Susan Boyle 'relieved' after Asperger's Syndrome diagnosis

Scottish singing sensation hits out at claims she has ‘brain damage’, instead says she suffers from high-functioning form of autism

Huge waves pound Eyemouth harbour in Scotland during the storm surge

UK extreme weather: Government in perfect storm over climate change gaffe as floods render homes uninsurable

Ministers accused of hugely underestimating number of households rendered uninsurable by repeated flooding

Industrial action threatens supply of beer to 30,000 premises across UK

Delivery workers are unhappy about changes to employment terms and conditions and a restructuring exercise to build three giant distribution hubs

Draymen's dispute threatens beer supply to thousands of pubs and clubs

Unite union says national agreement was being changed, threatening job losses

William Gladstone in 1861

The 120-year-old dilemma that continues to haunt Westminster

It is a question that is over 120 years old but has yet to be solved. William Gladstone was the first to raise the conundrum of whether elected representatives should be able to vote on issues which would have no effect on the lives of their constituents. In 1886, the four-times Prime Minister, talking about issues raised by Irish home rule, said: “If Ireland is to have domestic legislation for Irish affairs they cannot come here for English or Scottish affairs”.

One of the rescued dwarf crocodiles

Five Sisters Zoo fire: Reptiles, insects and an otter killed in blaze at West Lothian zoo

Dozens of reptiles,  meerkats and an otter among the dead after early morning blaze

Plan for separate votes by English MPs

Laws that affect only England should normally require the support of a majority of English MPs, a government-ordered inquiry recommends today.

John Poole: chemist, scholar and librarian

Dr John Poole: Highly valued Commons librarian

I have never understood why MPs require research assistants (I never had one, nor claimed for one). The House of Commons Library has among its staff many scholars who will supply objective information, often very promptly. Working among gifted contemporaries covering other fields was Dr John Poole, who from 1966 until his retirement in 1990 was Head of the Science section of the Library. Indeed, he was the founding father of the provision of serious scientific fact to Parliament.

Cecil Creber: Such was his attention to detail in the cause of safety, he was known as 'The Ferret'

Cecil Creber: Naval officer and witness at the 'Marchioness' inquiry

Such was his attention to detail in the cause of safety, he was known as 'The Ferret'

Pender with his medals, including the four bestowed on him by the Soviets

Willie Pender: Veteran of the Arctic convoys in the Second World War

If ever there were unsung heroes, few can have been less recognised by successive British governments than the sailors of the Royal Navy and Merchant Navy who participated in the Arctic convoys, carrying desperately needed supplies to Murmansk in 1941.

Eric Joyce

Eric Joyce charged with Commons 'assault'

Labour MP Eric Joyce has been charged with assault following a late night fracas at a House of Commons bar in which a Tory rival was allegedly head-butted.

23 in hospital after chemical spill

More than 23 people have been taken to hospital following a chemical spill at a warehouse.

'I tend to get the right answers rather quicker and more often than most': Horton in 1991

Sir Robert Horton: Dynamic and combative head of BP and Railtrack

Sir Robert Horton had a forceful, dynamic management style which in 1990 propelled him to the top of British Petroleum, then the world's third-largest oil company. It was assumed he would develop into a titan of the industry. But his trademark vigour was accompanied by another trademark, that of imperious arrogance, which despite his undoubted talents led to his removal as chairman and chief executive within two years.

Sir David Jack

Further to your obituary of Sir David Jack (9 December), Fifers are famous for dogged determination, writes Tam Dalyell.

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