Arts and Entertainment

Even if the sexual activity of Gill was not widely known in 1931 when this classic work was first published, his repeated references to “love-making” might have suggested that his interests were not purely typographical. On the latter subject, he is authoritative: “Lettering is for us the Roman alphabet.”

Review: Casa Negra, 54-56 Great, Eastern Street, London

'It has a jolly, Mexican-seaside vibe, not something you often find in Shoreditch'

Album review: Sven Helbig, Pocket Symphonies (Deutsche Grammophon)

Sven Helbig is a young German composer equally drawn to classical, pop and hip-hop modes, probably most famous for his orchestrations on Pet Shop Boys' Battleship Potemkin and The Most Incredible Thing. That populist spirit informs this debut release, with emotionally expansive pieces restricted to pop-song length.

Artist Graham Ovenden, 70, arriving at Plymouth Crown Court where he received 12 months' imprisonment suspended for two years after he was found guilty of a string of sex charges.

Artist Graham Ovenden avoids jail for child sex offences

An internationally renowned artist from Cornwall who was found guilty of a string of sex charges against children has avoided prison.

Up in the air: Marc Chagall’s Paris Through the Window (1913) will be at Tate Liverpool for four months

Heads Up: Chagall, Modern Master

Things are looking up – the first Chagall UK show in 15 years

Last night's viewing - The Sound and the Fury: a Century of Music, BBC4; Death in Paradise, BBC1

In the second of his series The Sound and the Fury: a Century of Music, Ian MacMillan addressed what he described as "one of the most ruthlessly experimental periods in the whole history of music." The adverb was intriguing. From whom was pity being withheld exactly? The audience, which explicitly became an irritating inconvenience to some composers? Or the composers themselves, who emerged from the horrors of totalitarianism to find themselves wrapped in a kind of elective cultural tyranny?

Collage years: Schwitters reciting a tone poem, in 1944

Charles Darwent on Schwitters in Britain: Sweet wrappers that made fascists quail

Kurt Schwitters, the German one-man avant-garde, was neglected in his adopted Britain but did the spadework for generations of artists

Five ladies leaning ... Salvador Dalí’s Dawn, Midday, Sunset and Dusk (1979) was inspired by the female figure in Jean-François Millet’s Angelus, which has been loaned to the Pompidou for this show

IoS visual art review: Dali, Pompidou Centre, Paris

Over-familiarity with the Surrealist has bred contempt, but beyond the showmanship there was a true talent for invention

Poll: Is two years in prison the right punishment for man who defaced Rothko painting?

The 26-year-old man who defaced a Rothko painting hanging at London's Tate Modern gallery has been jailed for two years.

<p>1. Dodo Pad</p>
<p>£12.95, dodopad.com</p>
<p>The 2013 Dodo Pad pretty much ticks all the boxes. Full of doodles, jokes and slightly strange ramblings, this is one for the lighthearted planner.</p>

The 10 Best diaries

From the smart and discreet to the more eye-catching, with one of these organisers you’ll never miss an appointment again

Great Works: Maîtresse, 1996, by Mimi Parent

Collection Mony Vibescu

Syrian rebels gain ground in Aleppo on eve of truce

Anti-regime forces made major advances in Syria's largest city yesterday, claiming to have seized new areas in fighting on the eve of an internationally mandated ceasefire that will theoretically run until Monday.

Jim Armitage: Investors need not worry: Georgia's new leader is no Kremlin stooge – yet

Global Outlook The Tbilisi bar owner preferred to remain nameless. Given what he was about tell The Independent about his predictions for Georgia under its newly elected prime minister, you can understand why.

Record auction price expected for Kandinsky

A 1909 oil painting by Russian artist Wassily Kandinsky is poised to sell for as much as $30 million (£18.9 million) when it hits the auction block at Christie's this autumn, the auction house said today.

Milking the laughs: Brendan O'Carroll with his Bafta, and as his alter ego Mrs Brown

Is Saturday TV a bit of a drag?

The foul-mouthed, dysfunctional Mrs Brown is hoping to change all that with her new BBC celebrity quiz show

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General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence
Public relations as 'art'? Surely not

Confessions of a former PR man

The 'art' of public relations is being celebrated by the V&A museum, triggering some happy memories for DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef succumbs to his sugar cravings with super-luxurious sweet treats

Bill Granger's luxurious sweet treats

Our chef loves to stop for 30 minutes to catch up on the day's gossip, while nibbling on something sweet
London Marathon 2015: Paula Radcliffe and the mother of all goodbyes

The mother of all goodbyes

Paula Radcliffe's farewell to the London Marathon will be a family affair
Everton vs Manchester United: Steven Naismith demands 'better' if Toffees are to upset the odds against United

Steven Naismith: 'We know we must do better'

The Everton forward explains the reasons behind club's decline this season
Arsenal vs Chelsea: Praise to Arsene Wenger for having the courage of his convictions

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Praise to Wenger for having the courage of his convictions