Design: Dinah lights the way at the V&A

How do you take three centuries of British decorative arts out of their dusty cabinets and bring them alive? Easy, says Dinah Casson. Nonie Niesewand learns how.

Where the riverbank is wallpaper

If it's peace you're after, consider the village of Kelmscott, in the upper reaches of the Thames.

Mr 10 per cent takes his cut

British film has struck gold; Charles Finch has moved in on the action

Voyage from Dome's day to doomsday book

John Sutherland enjoys his flight in a revamped Time Machine; A Scientific Romance by Ronald Wright, Anchor, pounds 9.99

Three on view Grade II-listed cottages

North Lodge at Bramshott, near Liphook, Hampshire, is surrounded by fields and adjoining National Trust woodland. The two-bedroom cottage has mellow stone elevations with some stone mullion windows. Dating back to 1827, it has recently been modernised and has the potential to be enlarged. The sitting room has a deep open fireplace with an exposed beamed ceiling. In the dining room, an Aga is set into the chimney breast which adjoins the original bread oven. The bathroom is downstairs. The cottage, in a bit less than two acres of grounds, is three miles from Liphook on the main line to Waterloo and Portsmouth. It is for sale through Lane Fox (01438 661077) at a guide price of pounds 250,000.

COLLECTING: Throwing a pot of gold

From the depths of bankruptcy to the dizzying heights of success, Moorcroft Pottery has seen it all. Lucille Grant reports

Books: A no-place like home

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF UTOPIAN LITERATURE by Mary Ellen Snodgrass, ABD-Clio pounds 34.95

Forget Ruskin and William Morris: this woman wants to take the flat cap out of the working men's college

One of England's oldest adult education colleges, founded 150 years ago to provide a liberal education for working-class men, is being rocked by an internal dispute over claims that its governors are betraying its socialist roots and succumbing to the pressures of the marketplace.

Books: More Saxon violence on the box

As `Ivanhoe' begins its series today on BBC1, Clive Wilmer analyses the romantic derring-do in Tony Blair's favourite novel

When is a zodiac not a zodiac?

Despite the orgy of events, conferences and exhibitions earlier in the year to mark the centenary of William Morris' death, Morris actually died 100 years ago this month. One of his relatives explained her dislike of the youthful Morris with the observation that he "seems to see nothing and he observes everything". Both this comment and Alice's mystification about the raven and writing desk came to mind recently while on a pilgrimage to Waltham Abbey, where the youthful Morris rode out to escape from home in nearby Walthamstow.

There's gold in them there bowls

Sophie Walker on Moorcroft, the pottery that collectors all want

More disasters on the big screen for Sony

Sony was contemplating the wreckage yesterday from a turbulent few days at its film division which saw the ousting of Mark Canton as chairman of its Columbia TriStar pictures business, and a thoroughly public and embarrassing rejection of an offer to take the newly vacant job from Arnold Rifkin, a top Los Angeles talent agent.

Letter: Grave concern

Sir: My experience of visiting the grave of William Morris at Kelmscott contrasts hugely with that expressed by Dorothy Biltcliffe (Letters, 28 August).

Letter: William Morris's neglected grave

Sir: I would like David James (Letters, 31 August) to know that over the last two months I have been studying biographical details of William Morris, and I am fully aware of this great man's ideals. The object of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, which he founded in 1877, was to preserve historic buildings and oppose fashionable restoration of churches - in no way was it directed at gravestones in churchyards.

Letter: William Morris, rest in peace

Sir: Dorothy Biltcliffe's letter (28 August) calling for the restoration of William Morris's grave at Kelmscott displays ignorance of Morris's own strongly held views on the subject.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Vietnam & Cambodia
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Bruges
India & Nepal
Japan
Berlin, Dresden, Meissen & Colditz
Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
The drugs revolution starts now as MPs agree its high time for change

The drugs revolution starts now as MPs agree its high time for change

Commons debate highlights growing cross-party consensus on softening UK drugs legislation, unchanged for 43 years
The camera is turned on tabloid editors in Richard Peppiatt's 'One Rogue Reporter'

Gotcha! The camera is turned on tabloid editors

Hugh Grant says Richard Peppiatt's 'One Rogue Reporter' documentary will highlight issues raised by Leveson
Fall of the Berlin Wall: It was thanks to Mikhail Gorbachev that this symbol of division fell

Fall of the Berlin Wall

It was thanks to Gorbachev that this symbol of division fell
Halloween 2014: What makes Ouija boards, demon dolls, and evil clowns so frightening?

What makes ouija boards and demon dolls scary?

Ouija boards, demon dolls, evil children and clowns are all classic tropes of horror, and this year’s Halloween releases feature them all. What makes them so frightening, decade after decade?
A safari in modern Britain: Rose Rouse reveals how her four-year tour of Harlesden taught her as much about the UK as it did about NW10

Rose Rouse's safari in modern Britain

Rouse decided to walk and talk with as many different people as possible in her neighbourhood of Harlesden and her experiences have been published in a new book
Welcome to my world of no smell and odd tastes: How a bike accident left one woman living with unwanted food mash-ups

'My world of no smell and odd tastes'

A head injury from a bicycle accident had the surprising effect of robbing Nell Frizzell of two of her senses

Matt Parker is proud of his square roots

The "stand-up mathematician" is using comedy nights to preach maths to big audiences
Paul Scholes column: Beating Manchester City is vital part of life at Manchester United. This is first major test for Luke Shaw, Angel Di Maria and Radamel Falcao – it’s not a game to lose

Paul Scholes column

Beating City is vital part of life at United. This is first major test for Shaw, Di Maria and Falcao – it’s not a game to lose
Frank Warren: Call me an old git, but I just can't see that there's a place for women’s boxing

Frank Warren column

Call me an old git, but I just can't see that there's a place for women’s boxing
Adrian Heath interview: Former Everton striker prepares his Orlando City side for the MLS - and having Kaka in the dressing room

Adrian Heath's American dream...

Former Everton striker prepares his Orlando City side for the MLS - and having Kaka in the dressing room
Simon Hart: Manchester City will rise again but they need to change their attitude

Manchester City will rise again but they need to change their attitude

Manuel Pellegrini’s side are too good to fail and derby allows them to start again, says Simon Hart
Isis in Syria: A general reveals the lack of communication with the US - and his country's awkward relationship with their allies-by-default

A Syrian general speaks

A senior officer of Bashar al-Assad’s regime talks to Robert Fisk about his army’s brutal struggle with Isis, in a dirty war whose challenges include widespread atrocities
‘A bit of a shock...’ Cambridge economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

‘A bit of a shock...’ Economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

Guy Scott's predecessor, Michael Sata, died in a London hospital this week after a lengthy illness
Fall of the Berlin Wall: History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War

Fall of the Berlin Wall

History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War
How to turn your mobile phone into easy money

Turn your mobile phone into easy money

There are 90 million unused mobiles in the UK, which would be worth £7bn if we cashed them in, says David Crookes