Design: Dinah lights the way at the V&A

How do you take three centuries of British decorative arts out of their dusty cabinets and bring them alive? Easy, says Dinah Casson. Nonie Niesewand learns how.

Where the riverbank is wallpaper

If it's peace you're after, consider the village of Kelmscott, in the upper reaches of the Thames.

Mr 10 per cent takes his cut

British film has struck gold; Charles Finch has moved in on the action

Voyage from Dome's day to doomsday book

John Sutherland enjoys his flight in a revamped Time Machine; A Scientific Romance by Ronald Wright, Anchor, pounds 9.99

Three on view Grade II-listed cottages

North Lodge at Bramshott, near Liphook, Hampshire, is surrounded by fields and adjoining National Trust woodland. The two-bedroom cottage has mellow stone elevations with some stone mullion windows. Dating back to 1827, it has recently been modernised and has the potential to be enlarged. The sitting room has a deep open fireplace with an exposed beamed ceiling. In the dining room, an Aga is set into the chimney breast which adjoins the original bread oven. The bathroom is downstairs. The cottage, in a bit less than two acres of grounds, is three miles from Liphook on the main line to Waterloo and Portsmouth. It is for sale through Lane Fox (01438 661077) at a guide price of pounds 250,000.

COLLECTING: Throwing a pot of gold

From the depths of bankruptcy to the dizzying heights of success, Moorcroft Pottery has seen it all. Lucille Grant reports

Books: A no-place like home

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF UTOPIAN LITERATURE by Mary Ellen Snodgrass, ABD-Clio pounds 34.95

Forget Ruskin and William Morris: this woman wants to take the flat cap out of the working men's college

One of England's oldest adult education colleges, founded 150 years ago to provide a liberal education for working-class men, is being rocked by an internal dispute over claims that its governors are betraying its socialist roots and succumbing to the pressures of the marketplace.

Books: More Saxon violence on the box

As `Ivanhoe' begins its series today on BBC1, Clive Wilmer analyses the romantic derring-do in Tony Blair's favourite novel

When is a zodiac not a zodiac?

Despite the orgy of events, conferences and exhibitions earlier in the year to mark the centenary of William Morris' death, Morris actually died 100 years ago this month. One of his relatives explained her dislike of the youthful Morris with the observation that he "seems to see nothing and he observes everything". Both this comment and Alice's mystification about the raven and writing desk came to mind recently while on a pilgrimage to Waltham Abbey, where the youthful Morris rode out to escape from home in nearby Walthamstow.

There's gold in them there bowls

Sophie Walker on Moorcroft, the pottery that collectors all want

More disasters on the big screen for Sony

Sony was contemplating the wreckage yesterday from a turbulent few days at its film division which saw the ousting of Mark Canton as chairman of its Columbia TriStar pictures business, and a thoroughly public and embarrassing rejection of an offer to take the newly vacant job from Arnold Rifkin, a top Los Angeles talent agent.

Letter: Grave concern

Sir: My experience of visiting the grave of William Morris at Kelmscott contrasts hugely with that expressed by Dorothy Biltcliffe (Letters, 28 August).

Letter: William Morris's neglected grave

Sir: I would like David James (Letters, 31 August) to know that over the last two months I have been studying biographical details of William Morris, and I am fully aware of this great man's ideals. The object of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, which he founded in 1877, was to preserve historic buildings and oppose fashionable restoration of churches - in no way was it directed at gravestones in churchyards.

Letter: William Morris, rest in peace

Sir: Dorothy Biltcliffe's letter (28 August) calling for the restoration of William Morris's grave at Kelmscott displays ignorance of Morris's own strongly held views on the subject.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

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Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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