The allure of Provence

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

Spectacular scenery, glamour and culture are the attractions of this ancient region of southern France, says Aoife O'Riordain

Fragrant lavender fields, bustling markets and sun-drenched beaches: this alluring corner of south-eastern France is the quintessential summer holiday destination. There are the glamorous beach resorts of Saint-Tropez, Nice and Cannes; the honey-coloured hilltop villages and tranquil landscapes of the Luberon Valley depicted in Peter Mayle's novel A Year in Provence; and unspoilt islands such as the Iles d'Hyères near Toulon. Then there are the atmospheric towns and cities of Avignon, Arles, Aix-en-Provence, Saint-Rémy-de-Provence and Grasse, as well as the towering peaks of the Hautes-Alpes and the seemingly horizon-less, waterlogged plains of the Camargue. Provence's charms are rich and varied.

The name Provence derives from the first Roman province beyond the Alps, Provincia Romana, established in around 200BC. The Roman legacy can be found scattered all over the region, from the impressive second-century arena in Arles and the first-century Pont du Gard aqueduct in neighbouring Languedoc, to towns and cities such as Orange and Carpentras.

These days, Provence's modern borders correspond to the French administrative region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, a mosaic of six départements: Var, Bouches-du-Rhône, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Hautes-Alpes, Alpes-Maritimes and Vaucluse. Provence's western borders start at the River Rhône and extend as far as Italy to the east and the Southern Alps to the north.

Vestiges of Provence's rich and sometimes turbulent history can be seen throughout its landscape. Provence passed through various European royal houses in the Middle Ages, including the Catalans and the Counts of Provence, until it was incorporated into the French royal domain in 1486.

The 12th century also saw the construction of three of its most celebrated Romanesque Cistercian monasteries, known as the Three Sisters of Provence: Sénanque Abbey (www.senanque.fr) in the Vaucluse; Abbaye du Thoronet (thoronet.monuments-nationaux.fr) near Draguignan in the Var; and Abbaye du Silvacane (abbaye-silvacane.com) in Bouches-du-Rhône. In 1309, the Roman Catholic papacy also moved to Avignon where it remained until 1378 and the city's skyline is still dominated by the magnificent Unesco-listed Palais des Papes (00 33 4 32 74 32 74; www.palais-des-papes.com).

Marseille is reputedly France's oldest city, first founded by the Greeks in 600BC. This year it takes centre stage as one of two European Capitals of Culture 2013, along with Kosice in Slovakia. It is staging an ambitious programme of events throughout the year, as well as unveiling several new city landmarks, conceived by a stellar line-up of internationally renowned architects. These include the transformation of its Vieux Port by Norman Foster and new cultural institutions including the Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisation (00 33 4 96 13 80 90; mucem.org) which opens on 7 June and its neighbour, the Villa Méditerranée, a spectacular building that appears to float over the water in the renovated docks area by the Vieux Port.

Another highlight is the GR2013, a 360km-walking trail through Provence where people can discover the region's main attractions alongside some of its more off-the-beaten-track gems using traditional maps, videos and social media. For more details see mp2013.fr.

This year, seven stages of the 100th Tour de France (letour.com), which sets off from Porto-Vecchio in Corsica on 29 June, will also take place against the backdrop of Provence's stunning countryside, towns and cities. There are stages in Nice, Marseille and Aix-en-Provence and a challenging ascent of Mont-Ventoux, one of the region's most dramatic peaks in the Vaucluse.

For more information see Tourisme Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (00 33 4 91 56 47 00; tourismepaca.fr) and the French Tourist Board (rendezvousenfrance.com).

Mountain highs

Outdoor enthusiasts should make for Mercantour National Park, left. A landscape of Alpine peaks, lakes, rivers and forests, it is home to about half of the 4,200 species of flora found in France. Wildlife includes eagles, wild boar and wolves (mercantour.eu).

Alternatively, hop aboard one of France's most spectacular railways to get your mountain highs. The Chemins de Fer de Provence (00 33 4 97 03 80 80; trainprovence.com), also known as the Train des Pignes, travels between Nice and Dignes-les-Bains in Haute-Provence, passing through breathtaking mountain scenery; €23.30 one way.

French Travel Service (0844 848 8843; f-t-s.co.uk) has a six-night Provençal Adventure that takes in St-André-les-Alpes and a trip on the Train des Pignes for £685pp, with rail travel, four nights' half-board and two nights' B&B.

A movable feast

The Provençal table offers the ultimate Mediterranean diet and bountiful fresh fruit and vegetables. Regional dishes make the most of it: ratatouille, hearty stews known as daubes and tapenade, as well as more local specialities such as Nice's pissaladière, above, an onion tart topped with anchovies and black olives. One of the pleasures of a stay in Provence is a being able to buy and cook your own food from local markets. See jours-de-marche.com for locations.

Bouillabaisse is the classic seafood dish of Marseille; L'Epuisette (00 33 4 91 52 17 82; www.l-epuisette.fr) serves one of the best versions using the freshest fish (€69). Gourmets including Sir Terence Conran rave about Le Bistro du Paradou (00 33 4 90 54 32 70) in the village of Paradou near St-Rémy-de-Provence. This pretty, shuttered restaurant serves classic Provençal dishes on its €45 set menu (including wine). Booking is essential.

Riviera redux

The Côte d'Azur has enduring appeal – not to mention glamour. The coastline alternates between pretty, rocky inlets and long, sandy beaches, and Saint-Tropez is one of its most celebrated hot spots. This pastel-coloured fishing village became renowned in the 1950s and continues to thrive thanks to its buzzing social scene.

Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy has just reopened the doors of White 1921 (00 33 4 94 45 50 50; white1921.com), formerly La Maison Blanche, set in an elegant mansion. Doubles from €260, room only.

Also new for this year, Esprit (01483 791919; espritsun.com) is launching family summer holidays with a resort on the Giens peninsula near Toulon. A week at the Riviera Beach Club Family Village costs from £384pp including half-board, drinks, childcare and ferry crossing.

On 27 September, the Port of Toulon is hosting the spectacular Tall Ships Race with a host of events and entertainment over the ensuing four days. For more information see Tourisme Var (visitvar.fr).

For art's sake

Pay a visit to the spectacular renovation of the Château la Coste (00 33 4 42 61 89 98; chateau-la-coste.com), above, which combines two of Provence's pleasures – wine and art – with a more contemporary twist. The grounds, which feature the work of artists and architects from Louise Bourgeois to Jean Prouvé, can be explored via an Art and Architecture walk.

There is also a tasting tour of the winery and a café in the Tadao Ando-designed Art Centre. Admission from €12.

Where to stay

Opening next month near Tourtour, Domaine de la Baume (00 33 4 57 74 74 74; domaine-delabaume.com), above, has views over the Var countryside. Doubles from €400, half board.

The InterContinental Marseille Hotel Dieu (00 33 4 13 42 42 42; ihg.com) opened earlier this month in the city's heritage-listed former hospital; doubles from €250, room only. Mama Shelter (00 33 4 84 35 20 00; mamashelter.com) is more affordable: doubles from €49, room only.

The 14th-century village of Crillon-le-Brave has majestic views of the Vaucluse. The hotel of the same name (00 33 4 90 65 6161; crillonlebrave.com) offers doubles from €280, B&B.

For villa rentals try Villas Worldwide (world-villa.co.uk), CV Travel (cvtravel.co.uk), Wake Up in France (wakeupin france.co.uk), Provence Holiday Houses (provenceholidayhouses.com) and Lagrange Holidays (lagrange-holidays.co.uk).

Travel essentials

Provence is well served by flights from the UK. The main airport is Nice, served by British Airways (0844 493 0787; ba.com), easyJet (0843 104 5000; easyjet.com), Flybe (0871 700 2000; flybe.com), Jet2 (0871 226 1737; jet2.com), Monarch (0871 940 5040; monarch.co.uk) and Norwegian (020-8099 7254; norwegian.com) from a wide range of UK airports.

The second gateway is Marseille-Provence, served by BA, easyJet and Ryanair (0871 246 0000; ryanair.com).

By train, Eurostar (08432 186186; eurostar.com) has a single Saturday-only summer service between London St Pancras and Provence. Until 29 June, the train serves Avignon and Aix-en-Provence; from 6 July to 7 September it will run only to Avignon. At other times, you can connect with high-speed TGV services to Provence at Paris or Lille.

Within Provence, TER Regional Express trains (ter-sncf.com) provide useful services, especially along the coast. Rail is supplemented by buses. Services to isolated towns and villages are cheap but sporadic. Car rental is useful for exploring the interior, although traffic jams along the coast are common in high season.

Provence lends itself to exploration by foot or bike. Headwater (0845 154 5303; headwater.com) has various itineraries including a self-guided eight-night "Landscapes of the Luberon" walking tour from £998 per person, with transfers, accommodation with breakfast and four dinners, but not flights.

Voices
There will be a chance to bid for a rare example of the SAS Diary, collated by a former member of the regiment in the aftermath of World War II but only published – in a limited run of just 5,000 – in 2011
charity appealTime is running out to secure your favourite lot as our auction closes at 2pm tomorrow
Arts and Entertainment
Mark Wright has won The Apprentice 2014
tvThe Apprentice 2014 final
Arts and Entertainment
X Factor winner Ben Haenow has scored his first Christmas number one
music
News
i100
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
news
News
Elton John and David Furnish will marry on 21 December 2014
peopleSinger posts pictures of nuptials throughout the day
Arts and Entertainment
James May, Jeremy Clarkson and Richard Hammond in the Top Gear Patagonia Special
tv
News
File: James Woods attends the 52nd New York Film Festival at Walter Reade Theater on September 27, 2014
peopleActor was tweeting in wake of NYPD police shooting
News
Claudia Winkleman and co-host Tess Daly at the Strictly Come Dancing final
people
Extras
indybest
News
peopleLiam Williams posted photo of himself dressed as Wilfried Bony
Sport
Martin Skrtel heads in the dramatic equaliser
SPORTLiverpool vs Arsenal match report: Bandaged Martin Skrtel heads home in the 97th-minute
Travel
ebookHow to enjoy the perfect short break in 20 great cities
Independent Travel Videos
Independent Travel Videos
Simon Calder in Amsterdam
Independent Travel Videos
Simon Calder in Giverny
Independent Travel Videos
Simon Calder in St John's
Independent Travel Videos
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Travel

    Investigo: Finance Analyst

    £240 - £275 per day: Investigo: Support the global business through in-depth a...

    Ashdown Group: Data Manager - £Market Rate

    Negotiable: Ashdown Group: Data Manager - MySQL, Shell Scripts, Java, VB Scrip...

    Ashdown Group: Application Support Analyst - Bedfordshire/Cambs border - £32k

    £27000 - £32000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Application Support Analyst - near S...

    Recruitment Genius: Class 1 HGV Driver

    £23000 - £27000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This successful group of compan...

    Day In a Page

    The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

    The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

    Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
    From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

    Panto dames: before and after

    From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
    Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

    Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

    Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
    Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

    Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

    Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
    The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

    The man who hunts giants

    A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there
    The 12 ways of Christmas: Spare a thought for those who will be working to keep others safe during the festive season

    The 12 ways of Christmas

    We speak to a dozen people who will be working to keep others safe, happy and healthy over the holidays
    Birdwatching men have a lot in common with their feathered friends, new study shows

    The male exhibits strange behaviour

    A new study shows that birdwatching men have a lot in common with their feathered friends...
    Diaries of Evelyn Waugh, Virginia Woolf and Noël Coward reveal how they coped with the December blues

    Famous diaries: Christmas week in history

    Noël Coward parties into the night, Alan Clark bemoans the cost of servants, Evelyn Waugh ponders his drinking…
    From noble to narky, the fall of the open letter

    From noble to narky, the fall of the open letter

    The great tradition of St Paul and Zola reached its nadir with a hungry worker's rant to Russell Brand, says DJ Taylor
    A Christmas ghost story by Alison Moore: A prodigal daughter has a breakthrough

    A Christmas ghost story by Alison Moore

    The story was published earlier this month in 'Poor Souls' Light: Seven Curious Tales'
    Marian Keyes: The author on her pre-approved Christmas, true love's parking implications and living in the moment

    Marian Keyes

    The author on her pre-approved Christmas, true love's parking implications and living in the moment
    Bill Granger recipes: Our chef creates an Italian-inspired fish feast for Christmas Eve

    Bill Granger's Christmas Eve fish feast

    Bill's Italian friends introduced him to the Roman Catholic custom of a lavish fish supper on Christmas Eve. Here, he gives the tradition his own spin…
    Liverpool vs Arsenal: Brendan Rodgers is fighting for his reputation

    Rodgers fights for his reputation

    Liverpool manager tries to stay on his feet despite waves of criticism
    Amir Khan: 'The Taliban can threaten me but I must speak out... innocent kids, killed over nothing. It’s sick in the mind'

    Amir Khan attacks the Taliban

    'They can threaten me but I must speak out... innocent kids, killed over nothing. It’s sick in the mind'
    Michael Calvin: Sepp Blatter is my man of the year in sport. Bring on 2015, quick

    Michael Calvin's Last Word

    Sepp Blatter is my man of the year in sport. Bring on 2015, quick