Facelift for Budapest's famous baths

After years, sometimes decades of neglect, Budapest's historic thermal baths are in different stages of renovation to restore crumbling and rotting infrastructure to their heyday state.

The city's 50-odd baths are a major tourist magnet for Budapest, also known as the "world spa capital" - ranging from 500-year-old Turkish pools with intricate mozaic patterns and high domes supported by massive pillars left by the former Ottoman occupiers to more modern Art Nouveau spa complexes.

But the state of the facilities is as varied as their styles, and much of the work done so far has involved cosmetic or emergency fixes as a shortage of funds hampers the constant battle against the baths' complete disintegration.

No mason since the 1950s has set foot in the state-owned Kiraly spa - one of the oldest and grandest in Budapest, built in 1565.

The result is crumbling mortar, rusty pipes and an overspilling Turkish pool below a dome dotted with tiny circular windows each with its own trail of black rot.

"It is ripe for renovation," but work will start at the earliest in two years' time, Laszlo Miko, an architect involved in planning the reconstruction, told AFP, citing bureaucratic authorisation processes.

No funding source has yet been identified for Kiraly's facelift.

A few bus stops away at another state-owned spa - the Rudas, built between 1571 and 1572 by a local Ottoman leader, the pasha of Buda - the facade is also crumbling, revealing at least three layers of different paint.

But the interior is state-of-the-art after a massive upgrade in 2005-06, to be followed by an exterior spruce-up shortly.

Renovation is also underway at many other beautiful spas in the city, including the Ottoman-era Lukacs baths.

At the ancient Racz Turkish bath, 75-percent privately owned, a makeover was recently completed by private entrepreneurs.

Some of Budapest's baths are in private hands, some are the property of the municipality and yet others of the state.

Local government financing taps were closed five years ago by the then-leadership of Budapest, but a new municipality last year approved a one-off 710-million-forint (2.5-million-euro, $3.6-million) injection for the general management of the baths, as well as restoration work.

This represented 0.03 percent of the city's overall expenses for 2010.

With state money in short supply in tough economic times, 80 percent of the Rudas renovation, which cost nearly 500 million forints (1.8 million euros, $2.6 million), was funded by the European Union, according to Gyorgy Kozak, development director of Budapest Healing Baths and Hot Springs Ltd.

The spa company, which is municipality-owned and operates 13 baths and open-air pools in the city, including some of its more elegant ones, plans to apply for more EU funding for its other facilities as well.

Not that the baths' clientele, almost equally composed of tourists and locals, seems to care much about the dereliction.

On a recent morning, as Kiraly filled with visitors from Italy, Holland and France eager to experience Hungary's famous thermal waters, no one seemed to mind the decaying walls, the leaking windows and rattling showers.

"This is such authentic, beautiful architecture," said a student from Lausanne, Switzerland, relaxing in the 40-degree water of a small pool under the great dome.

More than simply carrying out urgently needed renovations, bath owners now also want to expand their appeal.

Indeed, with the exception of a few, the baths bleed money with running costs far exceeding ticket income.

"Stand-alone baths are generally loss-making everywhere in the world and are in many places subsidised," Kozak pointed out.

The Gellert, on the other hand, a sumptuously renovated Art Nouveau bath complex that includes a hotel - an amenity most other Budapest baths lack - is one of four spas in the city that actually make money.

By building adjacent accommodation, owners thus hope their baths can attract visitors seeking longer treatments, rather than city-hopping tourists on a short visit, said Kozak.

"If guests could walk from their rooms to the baths in slippers, they would stay for medical treatments lasting for weeks instead of the one-off visits during a long weekend," added Szilvia Czinege, BGYH's marketing chief.

Budapest boasts over a hundred thermal springs, feeding its host of spas with some 70 million litres of certified medicinal waters daily.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Travel
ebookHow to enjoy the perfect short break in 20 great cities
Independent Travel Videos
Independent Travel Videos
Simon Calder in Amsterdam
Independent Travel Videos
Simon Calder in Giverny
Independent Travel Videos
Simon Calder in St John's
Independent Travel Videos
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Travel

    Recruitment Genius: Product Advisor - Automotive

    £17000 - £23000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Due to the consistent growth of...

    Recruitment Genius: Sales Administrator - Automotive

    £18000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An opportunity exists for an ex...

    Recruitment Genius: Renewals Sales Executive - Automotive

    £20000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An opportunity exists for an ou...

    Recruitment Genius: Membership Sales Advisor

    £18000 - £26000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: The fastest growing fitness cha...

    Day In a Page

    Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

    Homeless Veterans campaign

    Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
    Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

    Lost without a trace

    But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
    Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

    Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

    Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
    International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

    Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

    Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
    Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

    Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

    Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
    Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

    Confessions of a planespotter

    With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
    Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

    Russia's gulag museum

    Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
    The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

    The big fresh food con

    Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
    Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

    Virginia Ironside was my landlady

    Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
    Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

    Paris Fashion Week 2015

    The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
    8 best workout DVDs

    8 best workout DVDs

    If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
    Paul Scholes column: I don't believe Jonny Evans was spitting at Papiss Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible

    Paul Scholes column

    I don't believe Evans was spitting at Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible
    Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

    From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

    Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
    Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

    Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

    The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
    War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

    Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

    Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable