How to pack a suitcase: The three 'Ps' of packing for a trip abroad

A print-out of your travel-insurance policy, if you have one, could also be useful

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The Independent Travel

The most draconian free cabin-baggage limits of any European airline belong to Wizz Air, the leading Eastern European no-frills carrier.

To avoid luggage charges on Wizz Air you must squeeze everything into a bag no bigger than 42x32x25cm. Which, for most travellers, should come as welcome news. You have a maximum of 33.6 litres for your most precious travelling possessions. That is more than enough space for the three "Ps" of packing for a trip abroad, They are...

Paper: starting with a passport. It should preferably be your own, and with sufficient validity – for many non-EU countries you will need six months remaining, while within the European Union documents are valid up to and including the expiry date.

Also, make sure you take some paper money. For the euro and dollar areas, buy currency in advance in the UK at the best rate you can. For most other countries (including Croatia, Turkey and Morocco), take sterling and shop around for the best rate.

A print-out of your travel-insurance policy, if you have one, could also be useful. And, even in this digital age, information on paper is the traveller's friend: a good guidebook, a map and perhaps the appropriate 48 hours downloaded free from independent.co.uk/travel/48-hours-in.

Pluggage: hotels have not kept up with our constant need to re-charge smart phones, e-readers, tablets and laptops. So, take the appropriate mains adaptor and a multi-way plug as well as the tangle of wires for each device.

Plastic bag: nine years ago, the "liquid bomb plot" led to new rules on liquids, aerosols and gels (LAGs) in cabin baggage. They must not be in containers bigger than 100ml and must be in a clear plastic resealable bag. Include some detergent, and you won't need to worry too much about the fourth P – pants.

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