Travel: What's on worldwide

Until 13 June

Salisbury, UK

The Salisbury Festival scores top points for its eclectic programme of arts events, bringing together groups as disparate as the Philharmonia Orchestra and Debbie Harry and the Jazz Passengers. Along with high quality classical concerts, the highlights include visits from the Royal National Theatre and the RSC, a performance of Sir Paul McCartney'sStanding Stone, the festival's first ever rock day, and madcap antics from The Cirque Baroque. Call the box office on 01722 320333.

27 - 30 May

Bahamas

Kick off your shoes and get ready to shuffle in the sand to the sounds of soca, reggae, rumba and zouk during the 5th annual Caribbean Muzik Festival. Sponsored partly by a Caribbean rum company, the festival promises to bring well lubricated, musical mayhem to the streets and beaches of Nassau and Freeport. There will be star performances from Arrow, Barrington Levy, and Shaggy. Events include street parties, a climactic final night concert at Fort Charlotte in Nassau, and the presentation of a Living Legend award to the artist who has contributed the

most to the growth of Caribbean music.

28 - 31 May

Portugal

Madeira's 11th International Rally of Classic Cars brings enthusiasts from across the globe to the hairpin bends of Madeira's dramatic coastline. Previous years have seen such beauties as a 1926 Bugatti 35-A, a 1935 Aston Martin Le Mans, and a 1938 Jaguar SS100 gracing the mountainous roads of Funchal Bay.

30 May

Southampton, UK

The Whitbread Round the World Yacht Race finally comes home to Southampton after nine months at sea, and covering 31,000 miles. After its setback in the southern ocean, the British Silk Cut team is currently fifth, but looks set to take second or third place. Supreme seadog is Californian Paul Cayard, already the winner on points. Celebrations at Ocean Village in Southampton on Saturday are open to the public.

30 May

China, Hong Kong, Taiwan.

Tuen Ng or the Dragon Boat Festival is celebrated in the fifth lunar month in memory of the poet Qu Yuan who committed suicide in 280 BC. Patriotic Qu Yuan, hearing that the Qin armies had invaded the former state of Chu, took a heavy stone and drowned himself in a nearby river. However, this is a festive rather than mournful occasion, and the highly competitive dragon boat races which take place between local teams attract huge cheering crowds.

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