The Independent | Archive
Home 1995 November

Sunday, 26 November 1995

  • chess
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    In this game, Kramnik shows the imaginative style that has marked him out as one of the men most likely to succeed Kasparov and Karpov at the top of world chess. His play in the opening was quite astounding. Moving his queen four times and his queen'...

  • Letter: Immigration Bill is 'firm' but not 'fair'
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: As an Eastern European exile to this shores, I read with interest Nirj Deva's article (Another View: "Fair and firm on immigration", 22 November) on the new Asylum and Immigration Bill. My disappointment with his article comes from the fact that...

  • Leading Article: Mr Murdoch's taxing times
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    The legality of News International's behaviour is not in question, but the morality is. It is a common and legitimate practice for companies to offset profits made in one area against losses made in another, before paying tax on the net profits that ...

  • Letter: Waiters do not get the service charge
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Hermione Ainley's letter (24 November) that tips are accepted with gratitude is fair comment, particularly when the quality of the service merits such award. However, an invidious practice has grown up in many restaurants where a "service charge...

  • Leading blights of Burma
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    The reason they had approached me rather than someone else was not hard to guess. In 1987, I had gone to Burma with a BBC film crew to make a programme called The Burma Road in the "Great Journeys" series. I had fallen in love with the country. I had...

  • Letter: Time-consuming exercise
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: You argue in your business comment column (25 November) that synchronising time with the Continent would "cut pounds 250m off electricity bills". But how is that compatible with your concluding advice to Scots concerned about longer, darker morn...

  • Letter: Wind turbines will save our planet
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: So, John Edwards (letter, 24 November) does not believe that "the public" will ever accept thousands of wind turbines. I personally regard wind turbines as machines of great beauty, just like a tall sailing ship, and will be delighted to see the...

  • Leading Article: A division that won't go away
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Until a month ago, the picture might have looked different. The French government was pursuing half-hearted economic policies that appeared to suggest it was looking for an excuse not to enter monetary union. In Germany, polls consistently showed pub...

  • Royalty and the Commoners
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Inside Parliament, MPs are forbidden by convention, not law, from debating the monarchy. Outside the Commons, we regain our privileges. Nicholas Soames got shot down for excessive loyalty to his Prince, while in yesterday's Sunday Telegraph, Douglas ...

  • Letter: Mandela's links with Indonesia
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: The equivocations and compromises of South African foreign policy are indeed disheartening ("When Mandela went missing", 21 November), especially when set beside the huge sacrifices made to establish black majority rule. But they are not totally...

  • Letter: Immigration Bill is 'firm' but not 'fair'
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Nirj Deva, MP, is quite wrong to describe the current Asylum and Immigration Bill as "fair and firm". The Bill is undoubtedly firm but is not fair, for it is likely to have adverse implications for refugees from Third World countries. Notwithsta...

  • When church and state divorce
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    In the decades that followed 1937, lay politicians might have seemed to be driving this new vehicle of state in accordance with the democratic wishes of all its passengers, but this was only because the church was choosing their route. This entirely ...

  • Letter: Help the elderly care for themselves
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir; In his article on paying for care of the elderly (Money: 25 November), Clifford German mentions a number of ways in which the Chancellor could ease the problem through tax concessions and by upping the pounds 8,000 asset threshold. Surely one of...

  • Letter: We blame the social workers
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Your front-page headline on the West case today (23 November) "Failures that put social services in the dock" signals by implication that social services were to blame in some way. You chose not to use a headline more consistent with the report,...

  • Cheap beer and tax cuts for UK plc
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    It is not difficult to imagine Kenneth Clarke circa 1750. He already has the claret-filled shape of an 18th century political hack; and, with the simplest addition of a lop-sided wig, could easily be painted into Hogarth's hustings - leering down fro...

  • Letter: Less litigation
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Kindly ask Polly Toynbee ("Watch out! There's a victim about", 24 November) to read the 1994 judicial statistics. They show that the litigation in English civil courts has dropped over the past few years, taking her argument with it. Yours faith...

  • Letter: Tables turned
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Any one block of the schools results tables falls clearly into three general categories: selective entry, non-selective comprehensive and specials for Special Educational Needs. No one would make comparison of results between the last two. Your ...

  • creativity a bad case of semi-colonic irritation
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    "With a semi-colon," says Alan Joel, "you can digest half your lunch", while according to Mollie Caird: "An infestation of these tiresome little pests can be dispersed by semi-colonic irrigation." "A semi-colon," writes Geraldine McKay, "would come i...

  • Letter: We blame the social workers
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: If the Prince of Wales had openly expressed the belief that certain elements at a certain palace were conspiring against his well-being, would Nicholas Soames have stated that the Prince was in an advanced state of paranoia - or would he have sa...

  • Letter: Time-consuming exercise
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Peter Popham seems intent on propagating the misconception that changing the time on our clocks can give us more hours of daylight ("Time for a little daylight - and sanity" 25 November), He quotes Dr Mayer Hillman's calculations that putting th...

  • this is the week that was
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    1868: General George Custer kills Chief Black Kettle of the Cheyenne. 1893: Women vote for the first time in a general election - in New Zealand. 28 November 1837: Birth of John Wesley Hyatt, inventor of the modern billiard ball. 1916: Four are injur...

  • yesterday was...
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Maria Naumovna, a retired Russian librarian who announced that she is close to her ambition of earning $100,000. Ms Naumovna works as a "human safe", hiding things in a complex network of secret places for clients who fear thieves and do not trust ba...

  • Letter: It's time to rid ourselves of this royal embarrassment
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    It is true that of the range of constitutional issues, the monarchy presents special difficulties - the personal position of the Royal Family, the power vested in the Establishment and an unfortunate history relating to the control of monarchs - whic...

  • Letter: Wrong county
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    T Burns Baulking, Oxfordshire

  • I awoke, and the world was a different place
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    "Did you see it?" people asked excitedly on Tuesday morning, obviously forgetting that I don't have the necessary equipment. A friend went on another programme while the broadcast was happening to give the feminist reaction; psychologists and therapi...

  • A constitution that could make a monarchist paranoid
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Certainly what the Princess wants - or, rather does not want - is very strange. She does not wish either to be divorced or to become Queen. It is what she told us last Monday. But in law this is impossible. One can only suppose that the Princess, in ...

  • Letter: Guildford not bad for women
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    First, it is not accurate to say that there are "very few congregations" in the Diocese of Guildford willing to accept women priests. In fact, at this time the employment prospects for women priests in this diocese are as good as in most other dioces...

  • Letter: A man who's after one thing
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    If she really wants to find someone who only wants her for one thing, she should choose a man (men?) unencumbered with emotions (residual/potential/his or even hers) - there are millions of them out there of all shapes, classes, colours, creeds etc. ...

  • Letter: Beatle basher
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    John Gibbs Bath, Avon

  • The last refuge for the left?
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    The idea of deserting Labour just as it is about to win power may seembizarre. But some radicals are doing just that. Michael Mansfield, the radical QC, said last week he was so revolted by Labour's failure to defend civil liberties that he had given...

  • Letter: Hunters are not Vandals
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    What is the NHS but a system of compulsory insurance? Who pays for it except the individual? The only real change which his system implies is that everyone would pay the same, thus transferring the burden from the rich to the poor: this thinking is t...

  • Letter: Wrong county
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    I Morgan Lincoln

  • Letter: Hunch backed
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Yes they did. Mayfair Entertainment International Ltd is the largest investor in the film. As chairman, I am happy to report that everyone there is delighted with that decision and its result. Roger Wingate London WC2

  • Letter: It's time to rid ourselves of this royal embarrassment
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    One was born into the landed gentry, went to private schools, was married - as a virgin - to the heir to the throne, who also happens to be one of the richest men in the world, has two children in private education, and seems to spend her time travel...

  • Britannia rules the lanes ... storm over old port ... water shame
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Oh, yes. Photograph: PA BONG! Yes, it's time once again for a Captain Moonlight Special In-depth Investigation, in which my investigators turn their beam upon a topic of pressing current interest. Today: bicycling monarchies. Yes, we know that many p...

  • Letter: Health care should go Dutch
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    What is the NHS but a system of compulsory insurance? Who pays for it except the individual? The only real change which his system implies is that everyone would pay the same, thus transferring the burden from the rich to the poor: this thinking is t...

  • Most of Britain could devise a better recipe for their happiness
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    When I was young, the prostitutes used to stand round Victoria's plinth under their umbrellas. They were big women, and not young. They did not bother with subtleties, like asking men if they were lonely or fancied company. Stamping a cigarette out i...

  • Oh, for Germany's 'deep flaws'
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Turning to other pages in the paper, FT readers would have seen that there is nothing wrong with the British takeover code. Northumbrian Water has accepted a bid from a French company, Forte is trying to fight off Granada, a Norwegian group is "threa...

  • Serious columnists don't bother with royal to-dos
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    He explains that those among my colleagues whom he terms (somewhat irreverently!) "the lightweights" - Ascherson, Watkins, et al - are determined to offer their "sideways looks" at the Princess. But there are more important events going on, our edito...

  • Emotion without tears
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Poised and, to use one of her own favourite words, strong, Diana looked a good advertisement for psychotherapy. Here was a woman who formerly had so few words for her emotions that she had been driven to express them through bulimia and self-mutilati...

  • Leading Article: Questions for ourselves, too
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Is it so surprising, then, that police, social workers and teachers failed for so long to detect what was happening? If friends, neighbours and relatives failed to notice anything untoward - the authorities received a few tips but not, in all truth, ...

  • Letter: Pony Club players are eccentric, not sexually deviant
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    In presenting The Other Pony Club as a squalid hive of sexual deviance and insecurity, justice has not been done to what is essentially a lighthearted and harmless erotic pastime. In comparison, the piece that Rapido TV did for their Eurotrash progra...

  • Letter: Castrati dads
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Regretfully, Alessandro Moreschi, the "last" castrato and the only one to leave recordings, about 12 in number, was never asked that question. He, too, claimed to have a numerous family, as Fred Gaisberg discovered when he made the recordings at the ...

  • Words
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    AFTER the Princess of Wales had used the word daunting or daunted about six times during the first 15 minutes of her television interview with Martin Bashir ("I was not daunted, and am not daunted, by the responsibilities" etc), a strange image began...

  • Letter: Health care should go Dutch
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    I lived in Holland for more than 20 years and found that the insurance schemes there resulted in efficiency and fairness. There is not the gulf between public and private medicine that exists here and private insurance does not buy the ability to jum...

  • Briefly
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Charles Murray, London N17 l YOUR leading article on the monarchy, "It's just showbiz" (19 November), ends by saying that it is "the show of the century" and that "we want it to run and run". Not all of us, we don't. More and more of us would like it...

  • Quotes of the week
    Sunday, 26 November 1995

    Radovan Karadzic, leader of the Bosnian Serbs, on the peace deal Hello Divorce. Bye Bye Daddy. Slogan for anti-divorce campaigners during the Irish referendum Stressed-out workers are no good to their families and no good to British business ... it i...

Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

VB.Net Developer - £40k - Surrey - WANTED ASAP

£35000 - £40000 per annum + competitive: Progressive Recruitment: .Mid Level V...

Digitakl Business Analyst, Slough

£40000 - £45000 per annum + Competitive Benefits: Progressive Recruitment: Dig...

Mechanical Estimator: Nuclear Energy - Sellafield

£40000 - £50000 per annum + Car, Medical, Fuel + More!: Progressive Recruitmen...

Dynamics NAV Techno-Functional Consultant

£50000 - £60000 per annum + benefits: Progressive Recruitment: An absolutely o...

Day In a Page

Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices