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Home 1995 November

Monday, 27 November 1995

  • LEADING ARTICLE: Taxing questions for Mr Clarke
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    For make no mistake about it, this will be a political performance. Mr Clarke has a complicated balancing act in front of him. The Conservative Party craves tax cuts in any form to bribe a hostile electorate and wrongfoot Labour. Meanwhile, he may ha...

  • LEADING ARTICLE: Don't lock up your daughters
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    It isn't hard to see why some parents might be concerned. The offending article certainly doesn't beat about the bush. To a 16-year-old girl asking about performing oral sex, the agony aunt (after urging the teenager not to be pressured into the act)...

  • ANOTHER VIEW: Shell must heed the danger
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Right now, Shell Oil is proving just how powerful modern business is, but in a very negative way. The revenue from its oil production is the lifeblood of the Nigerian dictatorship that murdered the writer, environmentalist and peaceful campaigner Ken...

  • LETTER: A world with the will to make peace
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: Now that the war in Bosnia is over and a peace deal has been agreed, it is important that the Western powers do not make the same mistakes that they have done in the past, namely doing too little, too late. There is still some probability that t...

  • LETTER: Is Howard right to resist EU anti-racism legislation?
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: Michael Howard is trying to make out that his resistance to an EU resolution on racism and xenophobia is a stand against unnecessary Eurocentralism. In reality, it is resistance to democracy and the rule of law in European decision-making. It is...

  • site unseen: The Council Chamber, Lowestoft Town Hall
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    In his early days, Peto helped construct several famous public structures, such as Nelson's Column, the Houses of Parliament and numerous theatres and gentlemen's clubs. He also helped finance the Great Exhibition of 1851, and was rewarded with a bar...

  • LETTER: Starved of sense
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: It may be that being so caught up with the philosophical niceties of whether Phraedrus is an early or late work of Plato, Julius Tomin has overlooked a less abstract problem regarding the dimension of time ("Pub philosopher on hunger strike over...

  • LETTER: Student loans are uncivilised
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    and others Sir: We are writing in response to your leading article "Let students pay - its only fair" (24 November). The article claims that the principle of making students pay is "sensible". Well, the only sensible option or principle is one which ...

  • LETTER: Press coverage in the dock
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    others Sir: More than two months ago, the Port of Liverpool employers tried to make most of their dockers do more overtime work by dismissing the rest. If the dockers' union had called a strike, its funds would have been seized by the courts, so the ...

  • LETTER: Restaurants make diners tip twice
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: Fed up with the apparent scorn with which my 15 per cent tip at the hairdresser's was received, I once asked an academic colleague how much he gave. "Nothing", he replied, "no one tips me." I have since wondered whether he ever went to the same ...

  • So farewell then, John Lennon
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    It seems a shocking reaction now and I was vaguely shocked by myself at the time, which is why I don't mention it often, but although I liked all the books he wrote and some of the songs he wrote, I always thought John Lennon was also a traitor to mu...

  • A church in psychedelic chaos
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Some might think this is little more than a slightly younger, weirder version of the standard naughty vicar tale. The wild, rave context of Brain's exploitation of his lovelies made it unusual in giving it an apparent cultural significance that prope...

  • In Ireland, no war is still good news
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    So the message being sent to the politicians could hardly be clearer. But this is a message that changes in mid-air and arrives giving the opposite impression to the one intended. The more that resting terrorists warn London to give up the idea of de...

  • chess
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Meanwhile, in Belgrade, Michael Adams has spent most of the Investbanka tournament in the bottom half of a very powerful field. His game against Vladimir Kramnik shows the sort of imaginative play he has been up against when meeting the new generatio...

  • LETTER: Is Howard right to resist EU anti-racism legislation?
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: For once the Home Secretary, Michael Howard, should be commended for resisting European pressure to make "denial" of the Holocaust illegal ("Howard opposed racism law 'to protect Rushdie' ", 25 November). To criminalise those suffering historica...

  • LETTER: Restaurants make diners tip twice
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: Your article "Restaurants should abolish tipping" (22 November) and subsequent letter (24 November) gloss over the most important point: many restaurateurs deliberately set out to cheat that majority of their customers who pay by credit card. Th...

  • LETTER: Restaurants make diners tip twice
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: I admire the honesty of Hermione Ainley (letters, 24 November) in admitting that her restaurant pays only a pittance to her part-time student workers. I am puzzled that she appears to be proud of this fact. A living wage for all her staff would ...

  • LETTER: Is Howard right to resist EU anti-racism legislation?
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: Sarah Helm (25 November) is apparently unaware that there does exist "British" legislation against religious discriminationbut it only applies to Northern Ireland. The Home Secretary's position on this matter emphasises the increasing ignorance ...

  • LETTER: A world with the will to make peace
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: It is difficult to disagree with your analysis (leading article, 25 November) that "the Europeans ... were not up to the task of settling the [Bosnian] conflict" and that "we are not yet ready to shake off 50 years of dependence on Washington". ...

  • LETTER: A world with the will to make peace
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Sir: Both Adrian Hastings and Hugh Murnaghan (letters, 24 November) criticise the Dayton plan for Bosnia because it accepts a form of partition. They may care to reflect upon President Alija Izetbegovic's reaction to the murderous expulsion of the Kr...

  • backgammon
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    Secondly, there is a world wide web backgammon page. Its Internet address is: www.statslab.cam.ac.uk/sret1/backgammon/main.html#books. It is constantly updated by Stephen Turner of Cambridge. This includes a section for beginners, book reviews, annot...

  • yesterday was...
    Tuesday, 28 November 1995

    marabouts and feticheurs, - the soothsayers and witchdoctors of the Ivory Coast, who are being increasingly consulted by election candidates. One said that he didn't believe it himself, but had been obliged to sacrifice five sheep last week to please...

  • Letter: Tables turned
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Any one block of the schools results tables falls clearly into three general categories: selective entry, non-selective comprehensive and specials for Special Educational Needs. No one would make comparison of results between the last two. Your ...

  • Leading Article: Mr Murdoch's taxing times
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    The legality of News International's behaviour is not in question, but the morality is. It is a common and legitimate practice for companies to offset profits made in one area against losses made in another, before paying tax on the net profits that ...

  • Leading Article: A division that won't go away
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Until a month ago, the picture might have looked different. The French government was pursuing half-hearted economic policies that appeared to suggest it was looking for an excuse not to enter monetary union. In Germany, polls consistently showed pub...

  • Letter: Waiters do not get the service charge
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Hermione Ainley's letter (24 November) that tips are accepted with gratitude is fair comment, particularly when the quality of the service merits such award. However, an invidious practice has grown up in many restaurants where a "service charge...

  • Royalty and the Commoners
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Inside Parliament, MPs are forbidden by convention, not law, from debating the monarchy. Outside the Commons, we regain our privileges. Nicholas Soames got shot down for excessive loyalty to his Prince, while in yesterday's Sunday Telegraph, Douglas ...

  • Leading blights of Burma
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    The reason they had approached me rather than someone else was not hard to guess. In 1987, I had gone to Burma with a BBC film crew to make a programme called The Burma Road in the "Great Journeys" series. I had fallen in love with the country. I had...

  • Letter: Mandela's links with Indonesia
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: The equivocations and compromises of South African foreign policy are indeed disheartening ("When Mandela went missing", 21 November), especially when set beside the huge sacrifices made to establish black majority rule. But they are not totally...

  • Letter: Time-consuming exercise
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: You argue in your business comment column (25 November) that synchronising time with the Continent would "cut pounds 250m off electricity bills". But how is that compatible with your concluding advice to Scots concerned about longer, darker morn...

  • Letter: Immigration Bill is 'firm' but not 'fair'
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Nirj Deva, MP, is quite wrong to describe the current Asylum and Immigration Bill as "fair and firm". The Bill is undoubtedly firm but is not fair, for it is likely to have adverse implications for refugees from Third World countries. Notwithsta...

  • When church and state divorce
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    In the decades that followed 1937, lay politicians might have seemed to be driving this new vehicle of state in accordance with the democratic wishes of all its passengers, but this was only because the church was choosing their route. This entirely ...

  • Letter: Wind turbines will save our planet
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: So, John Edwards (letter, 24 November) does not believe that "the public" will ever accept thousands of wind turbines. I personally regard wind turbines as machines of great beauty, just like a tall sailing ship, and will be delighted to see the...

  • Letter: Help the elderly care for themselves
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir; In his article on paying for care of the elderly (Money: 25 November), Clifford German mentions a number of ways in which the Chancellor could ease the problem through tax concessions and by upping the pounds 8,000 asset threshold. Surely one of...

  • Letter: We blame the social workers
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Your front-page headline on the West case today (23 November) "Failures that put social services in the dock" signals by implication that social services were to blame in some way. You chose not to use a headline more consistent with the report,...

  • Cheap beer and tax cuts for UK plc
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    It is not difficult to imagine Kenneth Clarke circa 1750. He already has the claret-filled shape of an 18th century political hack; and, with the simplest addition of a lop-sided wig, could easily be painted into Hogarth's hustings - leering down fro...

  • Letter: Less litigation
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Kindly ask Polly Toynbee ("Watch out! There's a victim about", 24 November) to read the 1994 judicial statistics. They show that the litigation in English civil courts has dropped over the past few years, taking her argument with it. Yours faith...

  • creativity a bad case of semi-colonic irritation
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    "With a semi-colon," says Alan Joel, "you can digest half your lunch", while according to Mollie Caird: "An infestation of these tiresome little pests can be dispersed by semi-colonic irrigation." "A semi-colon," writes Geraldine McKay, "would come i...

  • this is the week that was
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    1868: General George Custer kills Chief Black Kettle of the Cheyenne. 1893: Women vote for the first time in a general election - in New Zealand. 28 November 1837: Birth of John Wesley Hyatt, inventor of the modern billiard ball. 1916: Four are injur...

  • chess
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    In this game, Kramnik shows the imaginative style that has marked him out as one of the men most likely to succeed Kasparov and Karpov at the top of world chess. His play in the opening was quite astounding. Moving his queen four times and his queen'...

  • yesterday was...
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Maria Naumovna, a retired Russian librarian who announced that she is close to her ambition of earning $100,000. Ms Naumovna works as a "human safe", hiding things in a complex network of secret places for clients who fear thieves and do not trust ba...

  • Letter: We blame the social workers
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: If the Prince of Wales had openly expressed the belief that certain elements at a certain palace were conspiring against his well-being, would Nicholas Soames have stated that the Prince was in an advanced state of paranoia - or would he have sa...

  • Letter: Time-consuming exercise
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: Peter Popham seems intent on propagating the misconception that changing the time on our clocks can give us more hours of daylight ("Time for a little daylight - and sanity" 25 November), He quotes Dr Mayer Hillman's calculations that putting th...

  • Letter: Immigration Bill is 'firm' but not 'fair'
    Monday, 27 November 1995

    Sir: As an Eastern European exile to this shores, I read with interest Nirj Deva's article (Another View: "Fair and firm on immigration", 22 November) on the new Asylum and Immigration Bill. My disappointment with his article comes from the fact that...

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