The Independent | Archive
Home 1995 February

Monday, 20 February 1995

  • Another View : Too awful to be true?
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Your leader writers allege that my intention, in revealing certain KGB connections, was to make money. Undoubtedly their judgement is based on what they would do themselves. They seem to have forgotten that I worked secretly for the British for 11 ye...

  • Letter : Race relations: EU border controls, Clause IV, `honorary' citizen
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: What is it that causes any member of the House of Lords to believe that making Raoul Wallenberg an honorary citizen ("Posthumous acclaim for a hero of the age", 16 February) is to confer on Wallenberg something of value when there is a member of...

  • There's no news like old news
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Well, why was everyone talking about female clergy one day as if nothing else in the world mattered and the next they were forgotten? J Seedy-Rom writes: Because Dawn French made a sitcom about them. Statistics show that when a sitcom is made about a...

  • Leading Article : Natural born hypocrisy
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    The media reaction to Stone's violent condemnation of violence proves the point, he insists in an interview in this newspaper today. Journalists who habitually turn horrible murders into entertainment have been happy to report the copy-cat killings t...

  • EVIDENCE : Urban stress, creative tension
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    But too many European cities are losing people and jobs, too many city centres are losing life to out-of-town centres, and too many public housing estates are becoming islands of multiple social problems and exclusion. Yet throughout history, cities ...

  • Letter : Bill for war widows
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: On 21 February, Lord Freyberg will move amendments to the Pensions Bill highlighting the plight of our war and service widows. As the 50th anniversary of VE Day approaches, we wish to add our collective voice to his efforts on behalf of this mos...

  • Leading Article : Electric storm in the city
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    In the old days of nationalised corporations, the public figures were men like Alf Robens and Sir Peter Parker, who became household names. They were the figureheads of organisations like the National Coal Board and British Rail, appearing regularly ...

  • Sins of the father - or the press?
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    However, the ethical Karma Sutraflaps open to reveal new contortions of morality in the form of two unorthodox political sex stories: this week's extensive revelations from Mrs Jean Keirans, once the lover of the young John Major, and this week's cov...

  • Letter : Gene article had inherent fault
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: I was saddened that such a distinguished scientist as Patrick Bateson should write a misleading article on "The perils of genetic determinism" (18 February). The account of development that he provided, in terms of an interplay between individua...

  • Letter : Orange and purple poetry
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: How about: The delectable Lydia Gorringe, Sported hair of a rich russet orange. But although all the men are Convinced she used henna, She said "No - it's rust from a door hinge. Yours sincerely, TIM OWEN London, SW19

  • Don't relinquish your seats too easily
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    What, though, if the Euro-scepticism and the hyper-Thatcherism they detect in the party is not peaking, but is only starting now to gather momentum? That would have jaw-dropping implications for the current political order. But this is not implausibl...

  • Letter : Footnote
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: James Fenton's attempt to belittle the Sunday Times' report about KGB contacts with Michael Foot was a piece of polemic that would not have disgraced the Disinformation Department of the First Chief Directorate at the height of its powers ("Spy ...

  • Letter : Unionists' fears are justified
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: Your report "Unionists stand alone in anger" (17 February) describes how Unionists now feel isolated. Even the moderate Jim Nicholson (chairman of the Ulster Unionist Party) says: "We have no true friends in either government. We expect no quart...

  • Letter : Orange and purple poetry
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: Michael Fishberg (letter, 20 February) suggests "door-hinge" as a rhyme for "orange", but he does not see how the two words could be used in the same context. There is no difficulty about this, as the following clerihew shows: Said the Doctor, "...

  • Letter : Orange and purple poetry
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: H. Patroons (letter, 18 February) has shown a brave attempt to provide a rhyme for "orange", but I don't think "lozenge" really foots the bill. As anyone living in the Abergavenny area knows, there is only one true rhyme for "orange", and that i...

  • Letter : Orange and purple poetry
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: Surely "lozenge" no more rhymes with "orange" than "doubloons" with your correspondent's name "Patroons" (letter, 18 February). It is said that Robert Browning, when challenged to find rhymes for "orange" and that other unrhymable word, "month",...

  • Letter : Race relations: EU border controls, Clause IV, `honorary' citizen
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: We are writing to ensure that your readers are given an opportunity to hear the full range of views surrounding the current debate on Labour's object and values. The world is no longer divided into subject peoples of different colonial empires, ...

  • Letter : Race relations: EU border controls, Clause IV, `honorary' citizen
    Tuesday, 21 February 1995

    Sir: You recognise that the debate on border controls is dominated not by fear of immigration but of black immigration ("The race card is still in the pack", 14 February). It is disappointing, therefore, that you conclude, albeit reluctantly, that th...

  • No. 4: Schismism
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Actually, of course, Mr Clarke and Mr Portillo loathe one another. Clarke likes cigars, jazz and brothel creepers. He is rumpled, cheerful and bluff. The Chancellor is an extrovert. Portillo is Jesuitical and committed. His hairstyle is a narcissisti...

  • It will erode sovereignty, but it's inevitable
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Kenneth Clarke argued the other day, in a speech that still loudly reverberates, that it was possible for Britain to join a European currency without sacrificing much sovereignty, and without taking a "huge step on the path to a federal Europe". He i...

  • LETTER : Asylum seekers need legal help
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: The Home Secretary's decision to spend £37m on additional staff for the Home Office's Asylum Division and extra appeals adjudicators ("Howard cuts refugees' right of appeal", 16 February) is all very well, but it will not remove the current bott...

  • LETTER : The BBC's fight to retain its edge in a competitive market
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: The objectives outlined in the BBC's "promise to the public" are welcome, but some aspects do need questioning. First, why did the BBC axe Radio 5 and its children's programmes if it feels that the young are not being properly served? What are t...

  • LETTER : Haphazard aid
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: Douglas Hurd's speech on the future of aid (16 February) accuses the EU aid programme of being "diffuse" and "haphazard". In fact, "haphazard" could be the very word used to describe the Government's current aid policy. First, the Government rea...

  • LETTER : The BBC's fight to retain its edge in a competitive market
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir:Your leader on the future of the BBC (16 February) suggests that, "the summer's end will come when commercial broadcasters conclude that the BBC's freedom to move between the commercial and the publicly funded represents unfair competition". ITV ...

  • LEADING ARTICLE : Waging war on the UN
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    This conflict is as much about domestic politics as foreign involvement. It stems from the victory of Republicans in the congressional elections last November. Their triumph ensured that the Clinton presidency - already scarred by epic congressional ...

  • LEADING ARTICLE : Michael Foot's tainted accuser
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Mr Gordievsky has gone back to what he knows best: telling stories. He has realised that the press and public are interested in just the same material as his former bosses in Moscow, who once craved gossip about establishment figures sympathetic to t...

  • Thrusting and urgent. Oh, yes
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    As you know, the Cabinet has been divided for many years between those who believe in a united Europe and those who believe that any move towards union will betray our nationhood. Those who believe our destiny lies at the heart of Europe, and those w...

  • LETTER : It's time for a new entente cordiale
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: You recently carried two reports on Franco-British relations on European issues. Andrew Marr (20 January) commented on a discussion in Paris on 18 January and Mary Dejevsky (8 February) reports the article in Le Monde of 7 February by Jean-Pierr...

  • LETTER : There is a rhyme, but no reason
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: Concerning a rhyme for the word "orange" (Letters, 18 February). This little problem emerges every few years. My old English teacher at school gave us the solution easily enough: "door-hinge." However, it would be difficult to see in just what c...

  • PROPOSITIONS : Retiring at an age of equality
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    The change is to be phased in and does not start until 2010. No one born before 1950 will be affected. It is the long-term implications that matter. Ministers imply that the various alternatives can be simply costed. The truth is the figures are open...

  • LETTER : Liberal Democrats welcome activists
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: Beatrix Campbell, in her thought-provoking article "How active citizens become activists" (10 February), takes all the main parties to task for "contempt for the activist". She castigates Labour's "dread of autonomous activism" and then reproach...

  • Spy story that fails the credibility test
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Last time around, there was Neil Kinnock's Kremlin connection - a Sunday Times story which, when closely examined, turned out to be based on the fact that Kinnock had the kind of contact with Soviet diplomats you would expect a potential prime minist...

  • Can they cross the Rubicon?
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    The Unionist representatives are already pledged to oppose plans for innovations, such as crossborder bodies. The British and Irish governments argue that such institutions are necessary to give tangible expression to the Irishness of a large section...

  • LETTER : City of Liverpool is not a lost cause
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: Tony Bell criticises Liverpool but is quite happy, it seems, to frequent its pubs. It appears to be quite a common trait of people who live outside the city to, on the one hand, come into Liverpool to shop, to be entertained or, more importantly...

  • LETTER : City of Liverpool is not a lost cause
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: Tony Bell, "Speaker's Corner: the misery of Mersey" (15 February) gave some interesting home truths about Liverpool. No doubt you will receive correspondence from supporters of many of the fine initiatives in the city, but my concern is to take ...

  • DIARY
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    In Puerto Rico, the neighbours of my octogenarian host, John, are mostly pleasingly elderly. For while I would find it challenging to expose much body in the company of the young and perfect of limb and tan, among my swimsuited seniors there is no ne...

  • LETTER : The BBC's fight to retain its edge in a competitive market
    Monday, 20 February 1995

    Sir: John Birt last week called for "reflection in equal measure with disputation" from journalists and politicians. It is, therefore, a pity that you felt ("Summer cannot last for the BBC", 16 February) that "Labour has yet to construct an original ...

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