The Independent | Archive
Home 1995 March

Friday, 31 March 1995

  • Letter: British democracy inspires the world
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: Andrew Marr is right to say that everything is not hunky-dory in Britain today ("The end of our decline? We shall see", 30 March). But Britain's grey, dismal political climate should not be allowed to cloud our more positive achievements in cent...

  • A `good' cause to end good causes?
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    As the National Lottery Charities Board has not started giving out grants, it is difficult to say how far it will offset these huge losses. Camelot's latest estimates, based on the first four months' sales, are that charities will benefit from the lo...

  • Letter: Who said it first?
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: Brian Wilson (letter, 29 March) need not have gone to Nepal to find the "meaning of life". The slogan that impressed him is nothing less than a cheap paraphrase of Othello's words: Who steals my purse steals trash ... But he that filches from me...

  • Leading Article:Schooling becomes a lottery
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Many people might regard this event as harmless enough, even as an encouraging sign. Schools are poorly funded, taxpayers are unwilling to pay more, so why not tap the goodwill of local people? Surely, one might argue, this Northampton school provide...

  • Letter: Reduction of greenhouse gases
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: Frances Cairncross ("Global warming won't cost the earth", 28 March) is right in stating that Britain will restore its output of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels "thanks largely to electricity privatisation". Success in reducing carbon dioxide em...

  • Letter: Environmental vandalism
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: Am I alone in finding the words of Jose Manuel Muiz, president of the Spanish Association of Trawlermen (29 March) utterly hollow? He claims that for him and his cohorts, "Newfoundland is like a second home" and that some of them have "family ti...

  • Letter: You can't buy off painful memories
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: While I have every sympathy with the bereaved relatives of victims of any disaster, I think the idea of being compensated for seeing the incident on TV is ludicrous. I lost my mother in a tragic road accident, which people often refer to; and ye...

  • Letter: Riding the Fort William railway
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: When the dismantling of British Rail was first mooted, the Government scoffed at suggestions that this was leading to the erosion of train services north of Glasgow and Edinburgh. It now appears to be honouring its pledge that privatisation will...

  • A glass ceiling slides above Aitken
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Indeed, Aitken is nothing if not cool under fire. In the several scrapes of his surprisingly long career (he grew up politically, after the presidency of the Oxford University Conservative Association, by spending two years as private secretary to Se...

  • Letter:Aitken's double failure
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: Whether Jonathan Aitken knew about the sale of arms to Iran via Singapore is surely irrelevant to his fitness for high office. If he did not know then he failed to know crucial things that he was paid to know; if he did know then he failed to re...

  • Between a prop and a hard place
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Stuff that. I have discovered that Matthew thinks I'm not respectable and wishes to have nothing more to do with me. And here's a mystery, since, if I'm not respectable, how come Michelle, who grows more respectable every day, hasn't noticed? Or has ...

  • The Oxbridge art of rowing as you row
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    It all began with a small ad in the Times and ended yesterday - in so far as it can be said to have ended - with the president of the Oxford University boat crew threatening that today's 141st Boat Race might be the last unless Cambridge abandons the...

  • Letter: British democracy inspires the world
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: It is clear that Andrew Marr got pretty fed up at the "Britain in the World" conference. For good reason it seems, reading Michael Sheridan's sketch report ("Foreign Office makes sure it has the last word", 30 March). Accepting that the conferen...

  • Letter: A messy game of "human pinball"
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: Lest it be thought that Russia and the Baltic states have a monopoly on the shameful policy of shunting asylum-seekers across their borders ("Bitter odyssey of human cargo no one wants", 30 March), it should be pointed out that our very own Home...

  • QUOTE UNQUOTE
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    I did a picture in England one winter, and it was so cold I almost got married - Shelley Winters When seagulls follow a trawler, it is because they think sardines will be thrown into the sea - Eric Cantona, at a press conference following his success...

  • Letter: Riding the Fort William railway
    Saturday, 1 April 1995

    Sir: Congratulations to Jonathan Glancey on giving the real flavour of the Fort William sleeper "experience" ("A great train robbery", 27 March). This train is not only a vital economic and psychological link between the Western Highlands and the res...

  • Letter: Barbarism in the USA
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: While abhorring capital punishment, I had no idea how frightful the electric chair was until I read the description of the ordeal that Nick Ingram will undergo unless reprieved. By the Georgia prison service's own confession and nightmare descri...

  • Letter:Beveridge cure for "benefit tourism"
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: Peter Lilley's new habitual residency test, designed, he boasts, to eradicate "benefit tourists", is flawed in its conception and patently unjust in its application ("Thousands of Britons are failing benefit test", 23 March). A person returning ...

  • Letter: Barbarism in the USA
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: I have always considered our US "cousins" to be balancing on the edge of barbarism, but having just read your account of the fate probably awaiting Nick Ingram, I am persuaded to ask why they do not simply burn their murderers at the stake in th...

  • Letter: Charity losses due to lottery
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: Your news item "Lottery `hits charities hard' " (30 March) illustrates yet again that the National Lottery is having a major impact on the voluntary sector's other fundraising sources. The experience of Tenovus, and even the effect of the Nation...

  • Leading Article:Mr Aitken: a failing minister
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    For the second time in a week, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury has attempted to shoot the messenger. We are not going away, Mr Aitken, any more than John Humphrys is going to stop asking politicians hard questions. Now that is cleared up, let's g...

  • Letter: To be interviewed on "Panorama"
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: These are the facts behind Donald Macintyre's article "BBC is accused of giving in to Tories" (30 March). Both [Panorama deputy editor] Nick Robinson's memo and John Major's acceptance of our bid [to interview him] predated Jonathan Aitken's spe...

  • ANOTHER VIEW: I'm on Aitken's side
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    It is a moot point, but there is a moral difference between offensive and defensive weaponry. The lathes that BSA sold to Iran (the case against us for doing so was dropped in November 1992) can obviously be used to build almost anything, but not ser...

  • Why doesn't ET visit Ambridge?
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    "... have a cooked breakfast every morning?" "... allow people to smoke in your house?" "... take sugar in your tea?" "... smoke that stuff?" "... have your old Status Quo records?" "... listen to The Archers?" "... get a Sunday paper?" "... find The...

  • Letter: Post-traumatic stress: dubious diagnosis, bad law
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: Between 1955 and 1957, I did my National Service like thousands of others. I did not volunteer for the service, neither did I choose the particular branch of the service that I found myself in, namely the RAF Medical Branch. One of my duties was...

  • Letter: Nessie's diet
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: Martyn Kelly ("Fishy business in Loch Ness", 28 March) reports Dr Ian Winfield as saying that the fish stocks in Loch Ness are not big enough to feed a monster, therefore a monster does not exist. He confuses cause and effect. It is perfectly ob...

  • Letter: Counting youth unemployment
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: I have never, as Ken Coates claims (Letters, 28 March), denied that unemployment among young people is a problem. Rather, I was questioning his extraordinary claim that the unemployment figures were "polluted" because they contained fewer young ...

  • Ministers should know the price of lunch
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    All of which said, it is an odd business, isn't it? Either he knew about these armaments contracts or, as he assures us, he did not. If he did know, then he is chin-deep in liquid unpleasantness, and sinking. If he did not, then his former business a...

  • Leading Article:Of blood ties and turbot
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    The Mail devoted a page to a "cut-out- and-keep guide" to the forthcoming Spanish-Canadian war. Under a token ("I back Canada's fishermen") to be sent to Agriculture Minister William Waldegrave, a headline invited readers to spot the difference betwe...

  • Standing firm in his time warp
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Humanae Vitae was the 1968 encyclical by Pope Paul VI which surprised the world by proscribing contraception, overturning the recommendation of a painstaking pontifical commission of theologians and scientists which had concluded that the Church's tr...

  • Letter: Post-traumatic stress: dubious diagnosis, bad law
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: Although the Law Commission's proposals about compensation for post- traumatic stress disorder ("Families who see death on TV `deserve damages' ", 29 March) are no doubt based on a humane desire to help people who suffer, let me advise the utmos...

  • Letter: Barbarism in the USA
    Friday, 31 March 1995

    Sir: The execution of Nick Ingram, scheduled for next Thursday, is a brutal and horrific prospect for another reason that is mentioned neither in your report "Major warned against trying to stop execution" nor in your leader "The Prime Minister and c...

Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

SQL Report Analyst (SSRS, CA, SQL 2012)

£30000 - £38500 Per Annum + 25 days holiday, pension, subsidised restaurant: C...

Cost Reporting-MI Packs-Edinburgh-Bank-£350/day

£300 - £350 per day + competitive: Orgtel: Cost Reporting Manager - MI Packs -...

KS1 Teacher Plymouth

£23500 - £45000 per annum: Randstad Education Plymouth: Randstad Education Ltd...

PE Assistant Secondary School

£12000 - £13200 per annum: Randstad Education Manchester Secondary: PE assista...

Day In a Page

Ukraine crisis: The phoney war is over as Russian troops and armour pour across the border

The phoney war is over

Russian troops and armour pour into Ukraine
Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

The world’s entire food system is under attack - and Britain is most at risk, according to a new study
Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Seoul's plastic surgery industry is booming thanks to the popularity of the K-Pop look
From Mozart to Orson Welles: Creative geniuses who peaked too soon

Creative geniuses who peaked too soon

After the death of Sandy Wilson, 90, who wrote his only hit musical in his twenties, John Walsh wonders what it's like to peak too soon and go on to live a life more ordinary
Caught in the crossfire of a cyber Cold War

Caught in the crossfire of a cyber Cold War

Fears are mounting that Vladimir Putin has instructed hackers to target banks like JP Morgan
Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years

Salomé: A head for seduction

Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years. Now audiences can meet the Biblical femme fatale in two new stage and screen projects
From Bram Stoker to Stanley Kubrick, the British Library's latest exhibition celebrates all things Gothic

British Library celebrates all things Gothic

Forthcoming exhibition Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination will be the UK's largest ever celebration of Gothic literature
The Hard Rock Café's owners are embroiled in a bitter legal dispute - but is the restaurant chain worth fighting for?

Is the Hard Rock Café worth fighting for?

The restaurant chain's owners are currently embroiled in a bitter legal dispute
Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival

In search of Caribbean soul food

Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival
11 best face powders

11 best face powders

Sweep away shiny skin with our pick of the best pressed and loose powder bases
England vs Norway: Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Lack of Englishmen at leading Premier League clubs leaves manager hamstrung
Angel Di Maria and Cristiano Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

Di Maria and Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

They both inherited the iconic shirt at Old Trafford, but the £59.7m new boy is joining a club in a very different state
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone