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Sunday, 11 June 1995

  • LETTER:Individual's Islam
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: Frances D'Souza misses the point in her letter (8 June). In Islam, there is no priestly hierarchy, and despotic monarchy is alien to Islamic thinking. In the final analysis, it is the responsibility of the individual to decide and act on matters...

  • LETTER:Sepia shopping
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: Neither Peter Popham in his original article (Magazine, "Doomsday for rural England", 27 May), nor Tesco's corporate affairs director, Frances Elliott, in her letter published on 9 June, has mentioned the irony that the Dorchester Tesco is decor...

  • LEADING ARTICLE:Broken bargains in Bradford
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    It is all the more shocking that they should be doing so in Bradford, which is regarded as the city where accommodation with Muslim values had gone as far as anywhere in Britain. The city has had a Muslim mayor; its schools serve Halal meat and obser...

  • LETTER:Continuing importance of the ILO as upholder of rights
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: Alan Duncan, MP, asserts that the ideals of the International Labour Organisation "have turned to dust" (Another View, 8 June). This tripartite agency of the United Nations, he concludes, "has outlived its usefulness" and the UK could better ach...

  • LETTER:Continuing importance of the ILO as upholder of rights
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: The attack on the International Labour Organisation by Alan Duncan, MP, needs an answer. The ILO remains a vital body for establishing minimum standards at work and upholding basic human rights. The CBI, TUC and British government are all key pl...

  • This is the week that was
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    1667: Jean Baptiste Denys, personal physician to Louis XIV, carries out a successful transfusion of sheep's blood to a 15-year-old boy. 1839: In Cooperstown NY, Abner Doubleday introduces baseball to America. 1920: Charles Stephens, a British barber ...

  • Chess
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    When Artur Yusupov played 3.Bg5, avoiding all the sharp lines of the King's Indian or Grunfeld Defences that Kasparov loves so much, then followed it with 6.Qb3 and 8.Qxb6, a draw looked heavily odds-on as the likely result. The queens have gone, the...

  • LETTER:We must not neglect Nigeria
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: Monday 12 June marks the second anniversary of the annulled presidential elections in Nigeria. Since then, many opponents of the military regime have been arrested, including the elected President, Chief Abiola. A constitutional conference, supp...

  • One way to fill the sports slot
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    I tend to turn it off when a cabinet minister is sitting in the radio car, answering questions which he hasn't been asked, and my wife turns it off whenever the sports news arrives. ''Why is there a regular five-minute slot for news about sport every...

  • LETTER:Fitting memories
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: On 6 June you printed a short item (In brief: "Dying confession") saying that Sean Mayes, 49, had died of Aids and why his passing was newsworthy. Sean had revealed that his mother murdered his brother in 1972. He then led police to the body. Fo...

  • An ugly aesthetic alive and thriving
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    It's not yet too late to see what East Germany once looked like, but you will have to move fast if you are keen to catch it before it disappears. Stralsund, for instance, is much like the other Hanseatic ports of Lebeck and Gdansk, with red-brick, ga...

  • ISMISM New concepts for the Nineties; No. 19: Armanism
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Armani, Emporio n, less astronomically expensive end of the clothing empire, patronised by those intimidated by the staff at the check-out of the main Armani stores. Emporio Armani clobber is frequently to be found on the sort of football hooligans w...

  • letter:Historical relief
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: The scrabble for justice by Michael Goldman in the case of the great pee ("A pee spells trouble for Scrabble champion", 6 June) ought not to be allowed to disappear without reminding your readers of a piece of history worth retelling. I refer to...

  • LETTER:Customer choice in paying gas bills
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: On Friday (9 June) you published a letter from Bamber Gascoigne on the subject of estimated gas bills. We will shortly be contacting him with regard to his recent bill, but I would like to take this opportunity to address the issues raised and c...

  • Creativity: 2.8bn ways to spend your money
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Tom Gaunt points out that pounds 2.8bn could buy the archives of 225 famous families, or have a night out at his local pub. He also mentions in passing that "The Lloyds Names are offered two point eight billion repayment" is an anagram of "Deepen dos...

  • LEADING ARTICLE:The Scouts tied in knots
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    At first glance, the idea of the Scout movement choking on the prospect of vowing allegiance to an adulterous monarch seems sensationally absurd. The average Cub is likely to have more insight into divorce and its consequences than is implied in the ...

  • LETTER:Lib Dems wait for Labour
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: John Major ("Major seeks to win over anti-Ashdown 'Liberals' ", 10 June) has contrived, with his usual monotony, to get the wrong end of every stick in sight. Liberal Democrats have decided that this Tory government (not all Tory governments) ca...

  • LETTER:Continuing importance of the ILO as upholder of rights
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Sir: Alan Duncan seems to have overlooked some details in his rush to attack ILO "waste". Details such as the fact that the Government is spending the same amount on sending the CBI to this year's conference as the TUC, and that both organisations re...

  • J'accuse Malcolm Rifkind
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    We heard on the grapevine that we rather spoilt your trip to Florida last year. You were on your new nuclear submarine to watch the first test firing of your Trident missiles. But Greenpeace had a ship, inflatables and a helicopter a few fathoms abov...

  • Bridge
    Monday, 12 June 1995

    Playing a variable no-trump, East opened One Heart. South bid One Spade, West passed and North bid Two Hearts (an unassuming cue-bid, suggesting a raise to at least Two Spades based on high cards rather than distribution). With a six card suit and a ...

  • letter:Going for a tenor
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Michael Varcoe-Cocks London W6

  • letter:Fragile sort of nest-egg
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Ted Stroud London W12

  • letter:Sign of New Man: knot
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    In the age of Tony Blair all genuine new men are, of course, to be found wearing red ties. Charles Murray London N17

  • LETTER:A serious contender
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Several years ago I invited Prince Albrecht to open an exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum of paintings and drawings connected with Ludwig II of Bavaria. I was told by the then director of the museum, Sir Roy Strong, that Buckingham Palace...

  • Briefly
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Mervyn Jones London SW1

  • LETTER:While scientists look for proof, people are being poisoned
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Or, as in the case of the 600 deaths as a result of the Thorp radioactive discharges, we will be told these are theoretical not real deaths. (The calculation was never challenged, just the interpretation.) Crying "more research" creates the expectati...

  • LETTER:Bosnia: we cannot stand by
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    "A strong Serbia is the best guarantor of lasting peace in the Balkans", is it? Haven't we heard that somewhere before? Wasn't "a strong Germany the best guarantor of lasting peace in Europe" in the 1930s? And wasn't "a strong Iraq the best guarantor...

  • letter:A serious contender
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    However, although the 18th-century earls of Traquair may have supported Charles Edward Stuart, the 17th-century earl was "not at home" when the Royalist General Montrose, who fought so bravely for Charles I, requested shelter after his defeat by Parl...

  • letter:Pass the jam
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    The same could not be said of the supporting photographs, in particular the one bottom right on page 13 captioned "Traffic jam at Winnats Pass". On closer inspection I note that the jam is made up of parked cars leading to a dead-end. In fact, the ap...

  • Going for a tenor
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    The cognoscenti of Covent Garden (whose loud Bertie Wooster bleatings mar one's entertainment) simply cannot bear the idea that the lower orders should have the opportunity to hear and appreciate a great operatic tenor. Wheatcroft's allusion to "aren...

  • letter:Modern rot
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Until its termination, I would be prepared to wager that few readers knew what the Modern Review was and even fewer cared. Yet when we are being told of the increasing cost of newsprint and the resultant pressure on space, the qualities seem prepared...

  • LETTER:New thinking on crime
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Three key points are relevant. First, the rise in psychosocial disorders was marked during the "golden era" between 1950 and 1970 when there was low unemployment, improved living standards and a reduction in the gap between the rich and poor. Crime r...

  • Briefly
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Trevor Coultart Stevenage, Hertfordshire

  • LEADING ARTICLE:An inquiry, or a requiem?
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    This is the common thread that links the scandals of the past three years and it applies particularly to reactions to the Scott inquiry. On Monday night, a leak to the BBC revealed that William Waldegrave had been criticised by the inquiry for writin...

  • When to arm and when to call for peace has always divided Labour
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Most of the UN hostages have been released, and more has emerged about how President Slobodan Milosevic was induced to squeeze those releases out of the Bosnian Serbs. And it has become a little easier to explain what British troops are supposed to b...

  • Behind the screens
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    But for the most powerful man in commercial television - he controls what 20 million people watch when they press the ITV button in London and the Midlands - Green remains remarkably successful in evading public scrutiny. He rarely gives interviews a...

  • THE LIST
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    TODAY is the feast day of Saint Barnabus, first century apostle, born in Cyprus. Though not one of the original 12, he was an early convert to the teachings of Jesus and enlisted Saul of Tarsus (newly converted on the road to Damascus) to the task of...

  • Emma is hardly a dignified Lord Carrington
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    I am pleased to count Lord Carrington amongst my most devoted friends and admirers, and I have long felt that a film (never that dread word "movie", if you please!) concentrating on all Peter's most notable achievements from those early, devil-may-ca...

  • What's the point of religion if you can't be bigoted?
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    I ALSO hated school assembly. Different teachers took assembly each day. There was one woman who was Plymouth Brethren, and would jabber on about meeting a chap who was selfish and unkind, so she'd dunked him in the sea and he'd come out lovely and k...

  • An unhealthy intimacy with violence
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    It has already happened - in the video trade, release dates are not to be taken literally. At your local video shop, the posters are in the window, the cardboard cut-out is just inside the door (man holding machine- gun), and the tape is on its way t...

  • CAPTAIN MOONLIGHT:Trappin', beatin', poisonin'... letters bray ... hot dinner
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    n YOU have seen the picture below. And the question you want answering will be: is this really the end of the Captain? Sadly, no; but I have hopes. My eye was taken, you see, by the photograph and the accompanying legend in an advert for a book entit...

  • An attempt to discredit the man who kept us all awake
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Previously the attack on Sir Richard Scott's inquiry had been led by the Foreign Office. The department's chief warrior was Lord Howe, who has no great love for the present administration but was once Foreign Secretary until he was rudely interrupted...

  • words:Liberal
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    Liberal began nobly enough, meaning no more, in its happy dawn, than "to do with freedom". Free men pursued the liberal arts while others not so free slaved at the sciences, or "useful arts", which kept the free men alive. Then 19th-century liberals ...

  • Uncle Sam turns his back
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    The image helps give some meaning to the Babel of uncertainty that has characterised Washington's response to the latest crisis in Bosnia. A report in Wednesday's Washington Post, quoting "sources who asked not to be identified", portrayed a bewilder...

  • quotes of the week
    Sunday, 11 June 1995

    John Major on the constitution For the Tories to become believers in intervention for industry, skills, training and education will make them look like tourists in a foreign country with a phrase-book they don't understand. Gordon Brown, Shadow Chanc...

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